High fat diet activates early inflammation in mouse brains, supports link to neurologic disease

Researchers at Michigan Medicine have discovered that a high-fat diet promotes an early inflammatory response in the brains of mice through an immune pathway linked to diabetes and neurologic diseases, suggesting a possible bridge between metabolic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

Chula Medicine Determines “Cytokines” as Indicator of “Degenerative Joints” Giving Hopes for Better Disease Mitigation

Chula Medicine announced the discovery of “cytokines” in the body’s immune system that can determine the severity of osteoarthritis in elderly adults, hoping to facilitate the planning of follow-up and treatment of the disease, and reduction of its severity, while also recommending vitamin D and vitamin E supplements, body weight control, and proper exercise.

Research Identifies Potential Genetic Cause for MIS-C Complication Following COVID-19 Infection

New research findings have revealed an underlying genetic cause for why some children who have had COVID-19 infection develop Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a rare but potentially life-threatening disease.

The findings, published in Science, are the first potential genetic cause identified for MIS-C, a disease that typically occurs about four weeks after COVID-19 infection and has broad symptoms such as fever, vomiting and inflammation of the heart muscle that can lead to hospitalization. States have reported about 9,000 MIS-C cases, with 71 deaths, according to most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention numbers.

Mount Sinai Study Uncovers Mechanisms of Reactive Oxygen Species in Stem Cell Function and Inflammation Prevention

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies to demonstrate the importance of reactive oxygen species in maintaining stem cell function and preventing inflammation during wound repair, which could provide greater insights into the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to findings published in the journal Gut on October 3.

Ochsner and Tulane collaboration uncovers what happens to genes inside artery plaques to trigger strokes

Researchers at Ochsner Health and Tulane University School of Medicine have identified the genes that become active in carotid arteries when plaque rupture causes a stroke. The work, published in Scientific Reports, was made possible by acquiring samples closer to the time of the stroke than previously possible. The results provide a picture of what the cells in the plaque are doing near the moment they induce a stroke.

Down on Vitamin D? It could be the cause of chronic inflammation

World-first genetic research from the University of South Australia shows a direct link between low levels of vitamin D and high levels of inflammation, providing an important biomarker to identify people at higher risk of or severity of chronic illnesses with an inflammatory component.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for July 13, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include new targets involved in protecting DNA replication forks and preventing inflammatory responses, a new treatment option for elderly patients with late-stage acute myeloid leukemia, insights into the breast cancer tumor microenvironment, biomarkers of response to targeted and immune therapies, a novel cellular therapy option for osteosarcoma and a new target for inducing ferroptosis in cancer cells.

A dynamic duo of cells identified in lung blood vessels

Scientists have identified two subtypes of lung blood vessel cells. One subtype expresses more genes involved in inflammation and the regulation of the immune response; the other expresses more genes involved in cell regeneration and proliferation. The findings could lead to better treatments for lung infections.

Researchers Identify Potential Target for Treating Autoimmune Diseases

New research using a mouse model for multiple sclerosis has uncovered a potential new area to explore for possible treatments for autoimmune disorders.

A Prune—Or Six—a Day May Keep Inflammation at Bay

A study in postmenopausal people suggests eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health, reducing inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Study: Obesity raises the risk of gum disease by inflating growth of bone-destroying cells

Chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells that break down bone tissue, including the bone that holds teeth in place, according to new University at Buffalo research that sought to improve understanding of the connection between obesity and gum disease.

Blocking Cell Death Protein Reduces COPD-associated Inflammation, Lung Damage

Article title: Blockade of PD-1 decreases neutrophilic inflammation and lung damage in experimental COPD Authors Felix Ritzmann, Kai Borchardt, Giovanna Vella, Praneeth Chitirala, Adrian Angenendt, Christian Herr, Michael D. Menger, Markus Hoth, Annette Lis, Rainer M Bohle, Robert Bals, Christoph…

Study says inflammation seen in earliest stages of Parkinson’s disease, and it is different between men and women

New research shows evidence of inflammation in the blood of Parkinson’s disease patients during the earliest stages of the disease, lending support to theories that inflammation is a major driver of PD. The study also points out differences between the sexes in the symptoms and course of the disease.

Inflammatory diet linked to testosterone deficiency in men

Consuming a diet high in pro-inflammatory foods – including foods that contain refined carbohydrates and sugar as well as polyunsaturated fats – may be associated with increased odds of developing testosterone deficiency among men, suggests a study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Quit the Hookah! Lung Damage, Inflammation Is Reversible with Smoking Cessation

New research finds that quitting smoking is an effective way to resolve impaired lung function and airway inflammation associated with waterpipe smoking. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.