Plan estructurado para remuneración de los médicos mediante salario solamente sirve como modelo de pago igualitario, descubre estudio de Mayo Clinic

En el campo de la medicina, el pago igualitario entre hombres y mujeres continúa siendo inestable, pues se ha demostrado que persisten las diferencias entre los sexos en cuanto a remuneración, incluso al considerar la experiencia, la productividad clínica, el rango académico y otros factores. Estas inequidades llevan a remuneraciones considerablemente menores durante toda la vida laboral, desgaste profesional y actitud negativa hacia el trabajo, aparte de efectos adversos para la profesión y la sociedad.

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Trial Suggests Babies in Intensive Care Can be Better Protected From Parental Bacteria

For sick or prematurely born babies spending their first days of life in a hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the soothing voice and gentle touch of a loving parent can have a tremendous impact toward a positive outcome — that is, unless mom or dad’s visit leaves the infant with something extra: a dangerous bacterial infection.

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Why It Matters: Prescription for Disaster

Bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. A major cause is their overuse in both humans and animals. At the same time, a lack of financial incentives is setting back efforts to discover new classes of antibiotics. The problem is both global and local, and without new initiatives, many common medical conditions could become deadly once again.

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Objective Subtle Cognitive Difficulties Predict Amyloid Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

Researchers report that accumulating amyloid protein occurred faster among persons deemed to have “objectively-defined subtle cognitive difficulties” (Obj-SCD) than among persons considered to be “cognitively normal,” offering a potential new early biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease.

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Expert Alert: Keep exercising: New study finds it’s good for your brain’s gray matter

A study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases provides new evidence of an association between cardiorespiratory fitness and brain health, particularly in gray matter and total brain volume — regions of the brain involved with cognitive decline and aging.

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What Comes First, Beta-Amyloid Plaques or Thinking and Memory Problems?

The scientific community has long believed that beta-amyloid, a protein that can clump together and form sticky plaques in the brain, is the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Beta-amyloid then leads to other brain changes including neurodegeneration and eventually to thinking and memory problems. But a new study challenges that theory. The study suggests that subtle thinking and memory differences may come before, or happen alongside, the development of amyloid plaques that can be detected in the brain. The study is published in the December 30, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Direct-to-Consumer Fertility Tests Confuse and Mislead Consumers, Penn Study Shows

Direct-to-consumer hormone-based “fertility testing” for women is viewed by consumers as both an alternative, empowering tool for family planning, and a confusing and misleading one, according to the results of a new study from Penn Medicine. Findings from the small, first-of-its-kind ethnographic study reinforce the need for consumer education around the purpose and accuracy of the tests, which have seen increasing interest in recent years due to the low cost and widespread availability. The study was published in the journal of Social Science and Medicine.

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Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus

Life as we know it requires phosphorus, which is scarce. How did the early Earth supply this key ingredient? A University of Washington study, published Dec. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds answers in certain types of carbonate-rich lakes.

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