Study shows family medicine physicians face many barriers to providing medical abortions

A study by UC Davis and UC San Francisco identified multiple barriers that family physicians navigate to provide abortion services to their patients. The barriers include lack of physician training and federal, state and institutional restrictions on providing medication abortion.

Without Roe v. Wade, millions will travel farther for abortion care

The median distance to a clinic would increase from 40 miles to 113.5 miles. State-level legislation “abortion care deserts” that will disproportionally effect women of color and the impoverished. Large swathes of the country would experience a 100-fold increase in distance to care, particularly in the South, Midwest and Intermountain West.

WVU law professor says leak of draft opinion from U.S. Supreme Court on abortion rights will have ‘significant impact’ on people’s trust in High Court

“Shocking” is how a law professor at West Virginia University describes the alleged leak of a draft majority opinion from the U.S. Supreme Court, first reported by Politico, which appears to strike down the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision…

Experts Provide Hope and Treatment Options during Infertility Awareness Week

Infertility is a common problem affecting millions of Americans. The National Center of Health Statistics estimates 1 in 8 couples of reproductive age has problems conceiving. Infertility refers to the inability to produce a pregnancy after 12 months of unprotected…

Exercise Improves Health Markers in Young Female Survivors of Childhood Trauma

New research shows a progressive exercise training program mitigates some physiological and psychological effects of adverse childhood experiences in otherwise healthy young women. The study will be presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

A Prune—Or Six—a Day May Keep Inflammation at Bay

A study in postmenopausal people suggests eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health, reducing inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

The power of vitamin D: What experts already know (and are still learning) about the ‘sunshine vitamin’

It’s no secret that vitamin D is critical to balancing many areas of health. But from pediatric broken bones to cluster headaches, physicians and scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) are still learning just how powerful the so-called “sunshine vitamin” is.

Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Position Statement Recommends Addressing Palliative Care Early in Patient Journey

New Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) position statement advises that pulmonologists who treat patients with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) explore palliative care resources available in their communities to facilitate early referral and better quality of life.

New study suggests that breastfeeding may help prevent cognitive decline

A new study led by researchers at UCLA Health has found that women over the age of 50 who had breastfed their babies performed better on cognitive tests compared to women who had never breastfed. The findings, published in Evolution, Medicine and Public Health, suggest that breastfeeding may have a positive impact on postmenopausal women’s cognitive performance and could have long-term benefits for the mother’s brain.

Do a Mom’s Medications Affect Her Breast Milk and Baby? New Center Investigates

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $6.1M to launch a new research center studying the effects of maternal antibiotic use on breast milk and infant health. The center is funded by National Institutes of Health, as part of their new Maternal and Pediatric Precision in Therapeutics (MPRINT) Hub.

Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Researchers found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.

Vaccine Hesitancy and Pregnancy: @UCSDHealth expert on why you should get the COVID-19 shot

With recent statewide vaccination mandates, members of the public may have questions or concerns about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination, especially in pregnant mothers. Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, professor and chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UC…

From birth control to mammograms, many women missed out on preventive care for all of 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic knocked many women off schedule for important health appointments, a new study finds, and many didn’t get back on schedule even after clinics reopened. The effect may have been greatest in areas where such care is already likely falling behind experts’ recommendations.

New Chair Named for Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences

After a nationwide search, Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, has been named chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Health.

Center Brings Doctors, Scientists Together to Improve Health of Mother and Child

The Center for Perinatal Discovery at UC San Diego brings doctors and researchers together for clinical, translational and basic research to better understand maternal health, environmental exposures, fertility, pregnancy and the health of children.

ACSM Annual Meeting Research Highlights for June 3

ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference takes place virtually from June 1 to 5 with programming covering the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity.

Women: Lower-fat Diet Key to Liver Health Following Weight-loss Surgery

Research suggests that women who have weight loss surgery need to reduce the amount of fat they eat after surgery to reap the full benefit of the procedure and protect their liver function. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Weight cycling linked to increased sleep problems in women

Women with a history of weight cycling – losing and regaining 10 pounds or more, even once – have increased rates of insomnia and other sleep problems, reports a study in The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, official journal of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

ASU expert says mindfulness can be a “driving force and tool for advocacy” after year of political and social turmoil

This week, Nika Gueci, executive director at the Center for Mindfulness, Compassion and Resilience at Arizona State University, is speaking at the Mindful.org “Mindfulness for Healthcare” virtual summit. The conference brings together academics, health care professionals, scientists and experts in a virtual setting to…

A Crisis of Comfort

In “The Comfort Crisis,” UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Women had “alarmingly high rates” of mental health problems during start of the pandemic

A study at the University of Chicago Medicine found U.S. women experienced increased incidence of health-related socioeconomic risks (HRSRs), such as food insecurity and interpersonal violence, early in the COVID-19 pandemic. This was associated with “alarmingly high rates” of mental health problems, including depression and anxiety.

March Special Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Focuses on Women’s Health in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

The March issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology features new clinical research involving sex and gender, including effects of GI and liver conditions on pregnancy, gender disparities in diet and nutrition, Barrett’s esophagus incidence in women with scleroderma, factors influencing whether women pursue advanced endoscopy careers, endoscopy-related musculoskeletal injuries, sex hormone association with increased prevalence of certain types of cancer, and more.

COVID-19 pandemic has increased loneliness and other social issues, especially for women, Mayo research finds

Social distancing guidelines have reduced the spread of COVID-19, but lockdowns and isolation also have created or aggravated other well-being concerns, reports new research. Mayo Clinic investigators found a significant increase in loneliness and a decrease in feelings of friendship during the pandemic.

Resolve to talk to your doctor in the New Year

Due to COVID-19, it’s important to talk to your doctor right away if you’re experiencing symptoms such as shortness of breath or cough. Take notes about your symptoms, so your doctor can pinpoint if they are early warning signs of another respiratory disease such as pulmonary fibrosis (PF).

Hackensack Meridian Health Receives Grant from TD Charitable Foundation to Provide Mammograms to Women in Need

Hackensack Meridian – Meridian Health Foundation received a grant for $25,000 from the TD Charitable Foundation to support the Reducing Barriers to Mammograms at the Shore program, which provides free mammograms, diagnostic screenings and procedures to women in Monmouth and Ocean County who are low-income, have no available financial resources, are experiencing financial hardship, or are uninsured or underinsured.

New Grant Seeks to Fill Knowledge Gaps Regarding Spina Bifida

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine have been awarded a five-year, $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the causes of spina bifida, the most common structural defect of the central nervous system.

More Women Diagnosed with HCV During Pregnancy, but Many Infants Still Not Tested Despite Recommendations from Leading Health Organizations

Data from a new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience® – held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)– found that among pregnant women with hepatitis C virus (HCV), more than 25 percent were initially diagnosed during pregnancy screenings, which supports prenatal care as an important opportunity to screen for HCV in women. However, the study also found that less than one third of infants receive appropriate HCV testing, a significant care gap.

Sleep Apnea Does Not Raise Blood Pressure in Young Women

Article title: Sex differences in integrated neuro-cardiovascular control of blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic-hypoxia Authors:Dain W. Jacob, Elizabeth P. Ott, Sarah E. Baker, Zachariah M. Scruggs, Clayton L. Ivie, Jennifer L. Harper, Camila M. Manrique-Acevedo, Jaqueline K. Limberg From…

Healthy Lung Month: Know these pulmonary fibrosis risk factors

October is Healthy Lung Month, an apt time to educate the public about the importance of protecting our lungs against mold, airborne pollutants and smoking – which put hundreds of thousands of Americans at higher risk for pulmonary fibrosis (PF).