Four Rutgers Professors Named AAAS Fellows

Four Rutgers professors have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an honor given to AAAS members by their peers. They join 485 other new AAAS fellows as a result of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. A virtual induction ceremony is scheduled for Feb. 13, 2021.

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Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Science and Benefits of Handwashing in COVID-19 Era

New Brunswick, N.J. (Nov. 23, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Donald W. Schaffner, a food microbiologist who has also studied handwashing for more

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U.S. Seafood Industry Flounders Due to COVID-19

The pandemic is putting a hurt on the seafood industry, finds the largest study of COVID on U.S. fisheries, which suggests that American fishmongers may flounder – or go belly up – without more government aid.

-Monthly fresh seafood exports declined up to 43%
-Monthly imports fell up to 37%
-Catches dropped 40% some months.

Over the first six months of 2020:
-Total U.S. seafood exports are down 20%
-Imports are down 6%
-Further losses are likely as restrictions increase to address COVID-19.

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Testing Wastewater for COVID-19

UNLV researcher Edwin Oh and colleagues have implemented wastewater surveillance programs to screen samples for the presence of COVID-19 and to extract the RNA from the SARS-COV-2 virus to find targets that make vaccines more effective.

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Data access restrictions reduce diversity in scientific research, study finds

New technologies have allowed governments and other organizations to collect large, high-quality datasets that can be used in a variety of scientific research, from economics to biology to astronomy. Yet high costs and restrictions can limit both the diversity of researchers who have access and the range of research undertaken with this valuable data.

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Gut Microbiome Manipulation Could Result from Virus Discovery

Scientists have discovered how a common virus in the human gut infects and takes over bacterial cells – a finding that could be used to control the composition of the gut microbiome, which is important for human health. The Rutgers co-authored research, which could aid efforts to engineer beneficial bacteria that produce medicines and fuels and clean up pollutants, is published in the journal Nature.

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Baylor Scott & White Health announces new affiliations with Baylor College of Medicine and Texas A&M University to further expand the pipeline of exceptional clinical talent for Texas

Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit health system in the state of Texas, today announces two separate academic affiliations: a new affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine and an expanded affiliation with their long-time partner Texas A&M University. Both alliances are aimed at training future clinicians and developing programs that advance high-quality care and healthcare innovation.

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