MICHAEL S. CARTWRIGHT, MD, MS AWARDED THE JUN KIMURA OUTSTANDING EDUCATOR AWARD FROM AANEM

AANEM is pleased to announce Michael S. Cartwright, MD, MS is the winner of the 2021 Jun Kimura Outstanding Educator Award. This award is characterized by a member’s significant contributions relating to neuromuscular and electrodiagnostic medicine education.

UCI receives 5-year, $5 million CIRM award for training of diverse researchers

The University of California, Irvine has received a five-year, $5 million award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to support a comprehensive doctoral, postdoctoral and clinical researcher training program to prepare the current and next generation of leaders in stem cell biology, gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

New research “sniffs out” how associative memories are formed

Has the scent of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies ever taken you back to afternoons at your grandmother’s house? Has an old song ever brought back memories of a first date? The ability to remember relationships between unrelated items (an odor and a location, a song and an event) is known as associative memory.

Three PPPL scientists win competitive awards to conduct frontier plasma science work

World-class expertise in the study of plasma — the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei, or ions, that makes up 99 percent of the visible universe — has won frontier science projects for three physicists at PPPL.

NREF and AANS/CNS Tumor Section Announce StacheStrong and NREF Research Grant Recipients

The Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation (NREF) and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) Section on Tumors are pleased to announce Jacob Young, MD, and Daniel Green Eichberg, MD, as the recipients of the StacheStrong and NREF Research Grants on behalf of the AANS/CNS Section on Tumors. These grants were funded by the NREF through a partnership with StacheStrong, a 501(c)3 not-for-profit charity focused on raising funds and awareness for brain cancer research.

Researchers Show Novel Device Improves Blood Sugar Control in Hyperinsulinism Patients Whose Pancreas Has Been Removed

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have demonstrated that an experimental device can improve blood sugar control in patients who developed diabetes after their pancreas was removed to treat their hyperinsulinism, a genetic disease in which the pancreas produces too much insulin. Using a combination of continuous glucose monitoring, two hormone pumps, and an algorithm, the device, known as the bihormonal bionic pancreas (BHBP) and developed by researchers at Boston University, helped HI patients with diabetes maintain stable glucose levels over the study period.

Jacobs Foundation awards UCI $11 million to improve digital technologies for children

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 7, 2021 – In its latest commitment to advancing learning, the Jacobs Foundation has awarded a five-year, nearly $11 million grant to the University of California, Irvine for the creation of a collaborative network to help tailor digital technologies for children. Connecting the EdTech Research EcoSystem will bring together global leaders in computer science, psychology, neuroscience, education and educational technology in pursuit of this goal.

FAU Kicks Off Fall 2021 Virtual ‘Research in Action’ Series

“Research in Action” is a virtual weekly talk series on Zoom. Each week, participants can listen to experts in their fields as they present their latest research and participate in question-and-answer sessions.

$1.9M NSF-funded initiative to transform UIC undergraduate chemistry offerings

Supported by a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of Illinois Chicago department of chemistry will launch a project consisting of evidence-based research of teaching and learning practices, course and curriculum revisions and faculty development, all with the intention of enhancing STEM education for undergraduate students.

Experts caution: vaping prevention critical as teens head back to school during ongoing pandemic

The global COVID-19 pandemic has forced many people to live in relative isolation for more than a year. As adolescents return to school, public health experts caution parents to pay close attention to signs of tobacco use among teens. While there has been a decline in smoking traditional cigarettes among youth as well as adults, e-cigarette use continues to increase.
Experts express concern about rising rates of dual- and poly-tobacco product use, particularly among adolescents and young adults. A new evidence-based research centerThe evidence-based tobacco research program is conducting collaborative research aimed at increasing scientific knowledge to help regulate tobacco products effectively in a way that best serves individual and public health interests.

Rutgers to Expand Entrepreneurship Training Programs for Researchers as Partner in New NSF I-Corps™ Hub: Northeast Region

As a key player in developing and transforming innovators into entrepreneurs that improve people’s lives, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey will expand its entrepreneurship training programming and further equip faculty and student researchers with the skills and strategy needed to transition their discoveries into technologies and products, as a partner in the newly created NSF I-Corps™ Hub: Northeast Region.

Do Passengers Want Self-driving Cars to Behave More or Less Like Them?

Researchers asked participants about their personal driving behaviors such as speed, changing lanes, accelerating and decelerating and passing other vehicles. They also asked them the same questions about their expectations of a self-driving car performing these very same tasks. The objective of the study was to examine trust and distrust to see if there is a relationship between an individual’s driving behaviors and how they expect a self-driving car to behave.

What you need to know about the delta variant

For more than 40 years, UCI infectious disease researcher Michael Buchmeier has studied coronaviruses, and he’s one of the leading experts on SARS-CoV-2, the version of the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. As a more lethal mutation of the virus, called the delta variant, sparks another wave of cases, he offers his expertise about this threat.

UCI Center for Critical Korean Studies receives two international grants

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 23, 2021 — The Center for Critical Korean Studies at the University of California, Irvine has received two prestigious grants – one from the Academy of Korean Studies, the other from the Korea Foundation. They provide the UCI unit with more than $1 million for academic and programmatic developments, including a new faculty position.

BIDMC opens first-of-its-kind Spatial Technologies Unit to Massachusetts’ precision medicine research community

With the goal of dramatically accelerating discoveries in health and disease, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has opened a Spatial Technologies Unit, the first center in Massachusetts and one of the first of its kind worldwide. The new space will provide access to ground-breaking technologies that allow scientists to examine cells as they function within intact tissues. Made possible by a grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the BIDMC unit will be a nexus of the state’s precision medicine community, empowering researchers across healthcare, academia, research and industry.

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Researchers Awarded Major Multi-Center Grant to Study Uveal Melanoma

Researchers at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center and the University of Florida Health Cancer Center received a five-year, $3.95 million NIH grant to study how uveal melanoma spreads to the liver. This work was previously supported by two Florida State Team Science Awards, which provided early-stage funding to help the team progress to the larger NIH grant.

Research to Prevent Blindness and Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology Announce 2022 Recipient of RPB David F. Weeks Award for Outstanding Vision Research

Donald Zack, MD, PhD, is recognized for ground-breaking contributions to the field of vision research, funded by Research to Prevent Blindness, an anonymous donor, and the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology.

@UCIrvine, @UCIESS researcher Michael Prather serves as a review editor on @IPCC_CH reports. He is available for media interviews on the latest document’s pronouncements.

Michael Prather, Distinguished Professor of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine, is a review editor with the IPCC and has intimate knowledge of the process for preparing IPCC reports. He is available for media interviews. Please contact…

For Older LGBTQ+ Adults, Entering a Nursing Home Can Feel Like Coming out All Over Again

A research team at Rush University Medical Center set out to find out how older LGBTQ+ adults felt in long-term care facilities and what guidelines were in place in these facilities to protect its residents.

CHOP Researchers Develop Coating for Endotracheal Tubes that Releases Antimicrobial Peptides

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have created a coating that can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity. The innovation could reduce upper-airway bacterial inflammation during intubation, a situation that can lead to chronic inflammation and a condition called subglottic stenosis, the narrowing of the airway by an accumulation of scar tissue. The findings were published recently in the journal The Laryngoscope.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Identify Approach for Potential Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae Vaccine

Scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified two proteins that could be used for a potential vaccine against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Working in a mouse model, the investigators found that administering two bacterial adhesive proteins that play a key role in helping the bacteria to latch on to respiratory cells and initiate respiratory tract infection stimulated protective immunity against diverse NTHi strains, highlighting the vaccine potential.

UCI receives record $592 million in research funding for fiscal 2020-21

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 2, 2021 — From cutting-edge research for advancing precision medicine to an innovative new effort for improving public water infrastructure to increase conservation, University of California, Irvine scholars, scientists and physicians are blazing new paths to help change the world. And their impact keeps growing.

UW to lead new NSF institute for using artificial intelligence to understand dynamic systems

The University of Washington will lead a new artificial intelligence research institute that will focus on fundamental AI and machine learning theory, algorithms and applications for real-time learning and control of complex dynamic systems, which describe chaotic situations where conditions are constantly shifting and hard to predict.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Develop “Dimmer Switch” to Help Control Gene Therapy

In a major advancement in the field of gene therapy for rare and devastating diseases, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a “dimmer switch” system that can control levels of proteins expressed from gene therapy vectors. The system is based on alternative RNA splicing using an orally available small molecule and works effectively in tissues throughout the body, including the brain. The first research regarding this innovation was published today in the journal Nature.

Patients Report Long-Term Favorable Effects of Weight Loss Surgery in Their Daily Lives

A new analysis from the STAMPEDE trial shows that over the course of five years, patients who had bariatric and metabolic surgery to treat uncontrolled type 2 diabetes reported greater physical health, more energy, less body pain, and less negative effects of diabetes in their daily lives, compared with patients who had medical therapy alone for their diabetes.

Long-term changes in psychosocial and emotional quality of life measures were not significantly different between the surgical and medical groups. The research was published in the Annals of Surgery.

California’s carbon mitigation efforts may be thwarted by climate change itself

Irvine, Calif., July 22, 2021 – To meet an ambitious goal of carbon neutrality by 2045, California’s policymakers are relying in part on forests and shrublands to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, but researchers at the University of California, Irvine warn that future climate change may limit the ecosystem’s ability to perform this service.

FAU Nursing Faculty Member Receives NIH K01 Grant for Breast Cancer Research

Tarsha Jones, Ph.D., principal investigator and an assistant professor of nursing at FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, has received the National Institute of Health (NIH) K01 Career Development Award, a five-year, $772,525 award for a project titled, “Decision Support for Multigene Panel Testing and Family Risk Communication among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Young Breast Cancer Survivors.”

UCI scientists make X-ray vision-like camera to rapidly retrieve 3D images

Irvine, Calif., July 21, 2021 — It’s not exactly X-ray vision, but it’s close. In research published in the journal Optica, University of California, Irvine researchers describe a new type of camera technology that, when aimed at an object, can rapidly retrieve 3D images, displaying its chemical content down to the micrometer scale.