Media Advisory: Register for STS Annual Meeting and Press Briefings

Credentialed press representatives are invited to attend The Society of Thoracic Surgeons VIRTUAL 57th Annual Meeting. This interactive, fully digital experience—expected to be unlike anything that cardiothoracic surgery has experienced to date—will feature thought-provoking lectures, practice-changing science, and cutting-edge techniques and technologies.

Read more

Researchers Uncover A Potential Treatment For an Aggressive Form of Lung Cancer

DALLAS – Jan. 5, 2021 – Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in a highly aggressive form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These findings could pave the way for new treatments for patients with mutations in two key genes – KRAS and LKB1. Patients whose tumors contain both of these mutations, known as KL tumors, have poor outcomes and usually do not respond to immunotherapy.

Read more

Yale study leads to FDA approval of drug to treat non-small cell lung cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Yale Cancer Center researchers, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved osimertinib for the treatment of adults with early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR gene mutations, which occurs in about 10 percent of patients.

Read more

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Receives 2020 ACCC Clinical Research Award

Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology and Associate Cancer Center Director for Translational Research at Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital, has been selected as the 2020 Clinical Research Award recipient by the Association of Community Cancer Centers for significantly and positively impacting oncology patients, their families, and the broader oncology community.

Read more

Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy rates during spring COVID-19 surge

Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers from the University of Cincinnati explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge. The study has been selected for the 2020 Southern Surgical Association Program and published as an “article in press” on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print.

Read more

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations

UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1.

Read more

NYU Langone Health Expands Comprehensive Lung Cancer Care in Brooklyn

NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center, a National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, in partnership with NYU Langone Hospital–Brooklyn is growing its state-of-the-art lung cancer care in New York City’s largest borough with a new expansion of treatment and screening services.

Read more

MD Anderson researchers present immunotherapy advances at Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting

Promising clinical results with combination treatments for patients with melanoma and lung cancer highlight immunotherapy advances being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 35th Anniversary Annual Meeting & Pre-Conference Programs (SITC 2020) .

Read more

Compounds in Active Muscles May Help Slow Lung Cancer Growth

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the U.S. and accounts for roughly 25% of all cancer deaths. Patrick Ryan, MS, from Texas A&M University, and his research team found that treating cultured lung cancer cells with blood collected from contracting muscles—muscles that were exercised—did not grow as much as untreated cells.

Read more