ASTRO 2021: New Study from Memorial Sloan Kettering Finds Targeted Radiation Beneficial in Cases of Advanced Lung Cancer

A new study from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center found that high-dose radiation therapy administered alongside systemic therapy in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer can help extend progression free survival. This is the first and largest randomized clinical trial ever to study the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in treating oligoprogressive metastatic lung and breast cancers. These findings will be presented during this year’s American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) meeting in Chicago.

Intervention eliminates Black-white gaps in survival from early-stage breast and lung cancer

A new study shows that system-level changes to the way cancer care is delivered can also eliminate Black-white disparities in survival from early-stage lung and breast cancer. By identifying and addressing obstacles that kept patients from finishing radiation treatments for cancer, the intervention improved five-year survival rates for all patients and erased the survival gap between Black and white patients. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

High-dose radiation thwarts tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer

High-dose radiation therapy can be used to lengthen progression-free survival for people with advanced lung cancer when systemic therapy has not fully halted the growth or spread of metastases, according to a new study. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

NCCN Publishes New Guide to Improving Knowledge and Quality of Life for Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

NCCN announces the publication of new NCCN Guidelines for Patients®: Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC), which is a neuroendocrine tumor type of lung cancer that is linked to smoking and tends to be aggressive. This guide is free to view or download at NCCN.org/patientguidelines and is funded by NCCN Foundation®.

Antibody-drug conjugate shows impressive activity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with mutation in HER2 gene

More than half of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) bearing a mutation in the HER2 gene had their tumors stop growing or shrink for an extended time after treatment with a drug that hitches a chemotherapy agent to a highly targeted antibody, an international clinical trial led by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has found.

Right Program Could Turn Immune Cells into Cancer Killers

Cancer-fighting immune cells in patients with lung cancer whose tumors do not respond to immunotherapies appear to be running on a different “program” that makes them less effective than immune cells in patients whose cancers respond to these immune treatments, suggests a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

New Chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology Named to New Jersey’s Only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Expanding its multidisciplinary teams of highly specialized experts uniquely focused on the management of head and neck cancers and cancer of the lung, pleura and mediastinum, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and RWJBarnabas Health have welcomed Missak Haigentz, Jr., MD, as chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology and clinical director for Oncology Integration.

Adoptive Cell Therapy Plus Checkpoint Inhibitors Show Promise in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Researchers in Moffitt Cancer Center’s Lung Cancer Center of Excellence believe a combination of checkpoint inhibitors with adoptive cell therapy could be the answer for non-small cell lung cancer patients. Results of their investigator-initiated phase 1 clinical trial evaluating the checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab in combination with tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy was published today in Nature Medicine.

Yale Cancer Center Perspective Highlights New Advances for NSCLC

A new publication by Yale Cancer Center highlights recent breakthrough therapies developed to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The goal of the study is to provide views on how basic science advances will impact clinical research areas to help influence how NSCLC will be managed over the coming decade.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for August 11, 2021

Current advances include insights into anti-tumor responses, a targeted therapy combination for biliary tract cancers, biomarkers that may predict response to DNA damage repair inhibitors, a “virtual biopsy” using artificial intelligence to characterize tumors, new targeted and immunotherapy approaches for pancreatic cancer, understanding the impact of TP53 mutations on acute myeloid leukemia treatments, as well as a new strategy to overcome treatment-resistant KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

New research uncovers how cancers with common gene mutation develop resistance to targeted drugs

A new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers has given scientists their first look at the genomic landscape of tumors that have grown resistant to drugs targeting the abnormal KRASG12C protein. Their work shows that, far from adopting a common route to becoming resistant, the cells take a strikingly diverse set of avenues, often several at a time. The findings, reported online today in the New England Journal of Medicine, underscore the need for new drugs that inhibit KRAS differently than current agents do.

Targeted Therapy Pralsetinib Safely and Effectively Treats Lung and Thyroid Cancers with RET Alterations

Results from the multi-cohort Phase I/II ARROW clinical trial, conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers, showed that a once-daily dose of pralsetinib, a highly selective RET inhibitor, was safe and effective in treating patients with advanced RET fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and RET-altered thyroid cancer.

NUS researchers develop world’s first blood test for real-time monitoring of cancer treatment success

A team of researchers from the NUS Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Health Innovation & Technology has developed a novel blood test called ExoSCOPE that could tell doctors whether cancer treatment is working for a patient, within 24 hours after the treatment. This will enable doctors to customise the treatment plan to improve patients’ chances of recovery.

Newly approved targeted therapy sotorasib prolongs survival in KRAS G12C-mutated lung cancer

Results from the Phase II cohort of the CodeBreaK 100 study showed that treatment with the KRAS G12C inhibitor sotorasib achieved 12.5 months median overall survival in previously treated patients with KRAS G12C-mutated non-small cell lung cancer, according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Newly approved drug effective against lung cancer caused by genetic mutation

The new drug sotorasib reduces tumor size and shows promise in improving survival among patients with lung tumors caused by a specific DNA mutation, according to results of a global phase 2 clinical trial led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The drug is designed to shut down the effects of the mutation, which is found in about 13% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a common type of non-small-cell lung cancer.

Cleveland Clinic experts available to comment on cancer research presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers are involved with more than 50 studies that’ll be presented at the virtual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, June 4—8, 2021. Key research from Cleveland Clinic focuses on advancements in the prevention and…

Bringing medical AI closer to reality

For AI to continue to transform cancer diagnoses, researchers will have to prove that the success of their machine-learning tools can be reproduced from site to site and among different patient populations. Biomedical engineering researchers at Case Western Reserve University say they doing just that. They say they have demonstrated that their novel algorithms for distinguishing between benign and malignant lung cancer nodules on CT scan images from one site can now be successfully reproduced with patients from other sites and locations.

Case Western Reserve awarded $3 million National Cancer Institute grant to apply AI to immunotherapy in lung cancer patients

Medical researchers from Case Western Reserve University, New York University (NYU), and University Hospitals have been awarded a five-year, $3 million National Cancer Institute grant to develop and apply artificial intelligence (AI) tools for predicting which lung cancer patients will respond to immunotherapy.

CAP Opens PD-L1 Lung Tumor Testing Guideline for Public Comment

The College of American Pathologists (CAP), in collaboration with five other societies, developed a draft evidence-based clinical practice guideline that aims to optimize PD-L1 testing for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are being considered for immunooncology therapy.

Starting Smoking Cessation in Hospitalized Patients Would Reduce Many Premature Deaths

Each year in the U.S., about 30 million hospitalizations occur in individuals 18 and older. Of these, more than 7 million are current cigarette smokers whose average hospital stay is several days. Researchers say that starting smoking cessation therapy during hospitalization and maintaining high adherence post-discharge can markedly improve permanent quit rates in these patients with minimal to no side effects. Cessation therapy also should include long-term counseling and at least 90 days of a prescription drug, specifically, varenicline.

Study finds high tumor mutation burden predicts immunotherapy response in some, but not all, cancers

A high rate of genetic mutations within a tumor, known as high tumor mutation burden, was only useful for predicting immunotherapy responses in a subset of cancer types, suggesting that this may not reliably be used as a universal biomarker.

Cancer physician-scientist offers expertise on new lung cancer CT screening recommendations

Nasser Hanna, M.D., can provide expertise on the new guidelines for lung cancer screening recently issued by the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force. The USPSTF recommends yearly low-dose CT screening for those who are at high risk of developing lung…

Lung Cancer Cells Have Differential Signaling Responses to KRAS Inhibitor Treatment with Important Implications for Emerging Clinical Trials

In a new article published in Clinical Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers show that various subtypes of lung cancer cells activate different signaling pathways in response to KRASG12C inhibitor treatment. These results may help identify potential combination therapy approaches and guide treatment decisions for lung cancer patients in the future.

MD Anderson and Mirati Therapeutics announce KRAS strategic research and development collaboration in solid tumors

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced a strategic research and development collaboration to expand the evaluation of Mirati’s two investigational small molecule, potent and selective KRAS inhibitors – adagrasib (MRTX849), a G12C inhibitor in clinical development, and MRTX1133, a G12D inhibitor in preclinical development, as monotherapy and in combination with other agents – which target two of the most frequent KRAS mutations in cancer.

Missing Protein Helps Small Cell Lung Cancer Evade Immune Defenses

DALLAS – Jan. 25, 2021 – Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are missing a surface protein that triggers an immune response, allowing them to hide from one of the body’s key cancer defenses, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, reported online today in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, could lead to new treatments for SCLC, which has no effective therapies.

Media Advisory: Register for STS Annual Meeting and Press Briefings

Credentialed press representatives are invited to attend The Society of Thoracic Surgeons VIRTUAL 57th Annual Meeting. This interactive, fully digital experience—expected to be unlike anything that cardiothoracic surgery has experienced to date—will feature thought-provoking lectures, practice-changing science, and cutting-edge techniques and technologies.

Researchers Uncover A Potential Treatment For an Aggressive Form of Lung Cancer

DALLAS – Jan. 5, 2021 – Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in a highly aggressive form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These findings could pave the way for new treatments for patients with mutations in two key genes – KRAS and LKB1. Patients whose tumors contain both of these mutations, known as KL tumors, have poor outcomes and usually do not respond to immunotherapy.