Phase II clinical trial suggests treatment pre-surgery safe and effective option for localized non-small cell lung cancer

New study data shows that the immuno-oncology drug, atezolizumab is a safe and effective treatment for stage IB-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer patients prior to lung cancer surgery, according to a new study led by researchers with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute as part of the national Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium 3 study.

Researchers found that the survival of patients in this new study was far better – about 80% at three years post treatment and approximately twice as good as that which would be expected with surgery and chemotherapy alone. Study investigators also report data showing that the presence of high numbers of natural killer (NK) cells – a type of immune cell found in the blood before treatment – were associated with poor immunotherapy treatment effectiveness in this study. Patients with high levels of these cells might benefit from the addition of NK-specific therapy.

Mount Sinai Awarded Three-Year Grant to Explore Therapeutic Approaches to KRAS Mutant Lung Tumors

Mount Sinai is leading a team of lung cancer researchers that has been awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from Stand Up To Cancer® (SU2C) to explore therapeutic approaches to lung tumors with mutations in the KRAS gene, an undertaking that could have a significant impact for a large population of cancer patients who currently lack effective treatment options.

Sexual dysfunction high among women with lung cancer

Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent in women with lung cancer with most survey participants reporting little to no interest in sexual activity, according to research led by Narjust Florez (Duma), MD, associate director for the Cancer Care Equity Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The research was presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) World Conference on Lung Cancer 2022.

NUS study: Black cardamom effective against lung cancer cells

In Indian Ayurvedic medicine, black cardamom has been used in formulations to treat cancer and lung conditions. A team of NUS researchers studied the scientific basis behind this traditional medicinal practice and provided evidence of the cytotoxic effect of black cardamom on lung cancer cells. The findings could potentially lead to the discovery of safe and effective new bioactives which can prevent or cure cancer formation.

$5.3 million grant supports research into lung cancer recurrence

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are leading a national study aimed at identifying patients with early-stage lung cancer who are at high risk of having the cancer return, even after surgery and chemotherapy appear to have eliminated their tumors. The research is supported by a $5.3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Penn Medicine Awarded $9 Million to Advance Study of Technology that Lights Up Lung Cancer Tumors

Building on Penn Medicine’s years of research and use of imaging technology that illuminates tumor tissue—helping clinicians more easily detect and remove it—the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has received a five-year, $9 million research grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to push the field forward, particularly for lung cancer patients.

Targeted Drug Achieves 43% Response Rate in KRAS-mutated Lung Cancer

Nearly 43% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose lung cancers harbored a specific KRAS mutation responded to the experimental drug adagrasib, and the targeted agent also showed activity against lesions in the brain that metastasized from the lung tumors, according to results of a study led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators.

Henry Ford Health is First in the World to Offer Latest Advancement in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

Henry Ford Health is the first in the world to complete a full course of patient treatments using the latest advancement in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiation therapy, which integrates real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and linear acceleration to deliver precise and accurate radiation treatment more rapidly than ever before.

Biomarker in Liquid Biopsy for Lung Cancer Appears More Accurate in Predicting Immunotherapy Response Than Tumor Biopsy

Mount Sinai researchers have validated for the first time that a simple blood test called a liquid biopsy could be a better predictor of whether cancer immunotherapy will be successful for a patient with lung cancer than an invasive tumor biopsy procedure. Their study was published in the Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research in June.

Penn Medicine Study Reveals Imaging Approach with Potential to Detect Lung Cancer Earlier, at the Cellular Level

Researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to identify lung cancer at the cellular level in real time during a biopsy, offering promise in the ability to detect the disease earlier and with more confidence. The research is published this week in Nature Communications.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for May 4, 2022

Featured studies include clinical advances with a new combination therapy targeting angiogenesis in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer and a promising immunotherapy combination for kidney cancer, plus laboratory studies that focus on targeting ferroptosis in specific lung cancers, developing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms, and characterizing racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer early detection.

Moffitt Researchers Develop Model to Predict Patients with Poor Lung Cancer Outcomes

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are working to improve the ability to identify patients who are at a higher risk of poor survival through radiomics, an area of science that uses imaging, such as CT scans and MRIs, to uncover tumoral patterns and characteristics that may not be easy to spot by the naked eye. Results of their newest study was published today in Cancer Biomarkers.

Simple changes in care reduced heart exposure during lung cancer radiation treatment

A team at the University of Michigan Health Rogel Cancer Center, in partnership with the statewide Michigan Radiation Oncology Quality Consortium (MROQC) lung cancer collaborative, found that raising awareness about the risk of radiation exposure to the heart and standardizing cardiac exposure limits reduced the average dose to the heart by 15% and reduced the number of patients receiving the highest heart doses by half without minimizing tumor treatment or increasing dosage to other at-risk organs in the chest

NCCN Announces Funding for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Projects, in Collaboration with AstraZeneca

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s Oncology Research Program to oversee projects focused on improving patient care and outcomes in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer in collaboration with AstraZeneca.

Confronting Disparities in Lung Cancer

Compared with all other racial and ethnic groups in the United States, Black people are disproportionally more affected by lung cancer. Sharon R. Pine, PhD, a resident member of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, associate professor of Pharmacology and Medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and member of the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence e, discusses the barriers that Black people face, the research being done on racial health disparities and how action can be taken now.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for November 3, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include the cost-effectiveness of expanded lung cancer screening criteria, a novel biomarker for predicting immunotherapy responses, development of a technique for multiplex single-cell chromatin profiling, combination immunotherapy for bone metastatic prostate cancer, understanding drivers of lung cancer metastasis, and enabling new T cell therapies for treating COVID-19.

ASTRO 2021: New Study from Memorial Sloan Kettering Finds Targeted Radiation Beneficial in Cases of Advanced Lung Cancer

A new study from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center found that high-dose radiation therapy administered alongside systemic therapy in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer can help extend progression free survival. This is the first and largest randomized clinical trial ever to study the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in treating oligoprogressive metastatic lung and breast cancers. These findings will be presented during this year’s American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) meeting in Chicago.

Intervention eliminates Black-white gaps in survival from early-stage breast and lung cancer

A new study shows that system-level changes to the way cancer care is delivered can also eliminate Black-white disparities in survival from early-stage lung and breast cancer. By identifying and addressing obstacles that kept patients from finishing radiation treatments for cancer, the intervention improved five-year survival rates for all patients and erased the survival gap between Black and white patients. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

High-dose radiation thwarts tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer

High-dose radiation therapy can be used to lengthen progression-free survival for people with advanced lung cancer when systemic therapy has not fully halted the growth or spread of metastases, according to a new study. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

NCCN Publishes New Guide to Improving Knowledge and Quality of Life for Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

NCCN announces the publication of new NCCN Guidelines for Patients®: Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC), which is a neuroendocrine tumor type of lung cancer that is linked to smoking and tends to be aggressive. This guide is free to view or download at NCCN.org/patientguidelines and is funded by NCCN Foundation®.

Antibody-drug conjugate shows impressive activity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with mutation in HER2 gene

More than half of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) bearing a mutation in the HER2 gene had their tumors stop growing or shrink for an extended time after treatment with a drug that hitches a chemotherapy agent to a highly targeted antibody, an international clinical trial led by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has found.

Right Program Could Turn Immune Cells into Cancer Killers

Cancer-fighting immune cells in patients with lung cancer whose tumors do not respond to immunotherapies appear to be running on a different “program” that makes them less effective than immune cells in patients whose cancers respond to these immune treatments, suggests a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

New Chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology Named to New Jersey’s Only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Expanding its multidisciplinary teams of highly specialized experts uniquely focused on the management of head and neck cancers and cancer of the lung, pleura and mediastinum, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and RWJBarnabas Health have welcomed Missak Haigentz, Jr., MD, as chief of Thoracic and Head and Neck Medical Oncology and clinical director for Oncology Integration.

Adoptive Cell Therapy Plus Checkpoint Inhibitors Show Promise in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Researchers in Moffitt Cancer Center’s Lung Cancer Center of Excellence believe a combination of checkpoint inhibitors with adoptive cell therapy could be the answer for non-small cell lung cancer patients. Results of their investigator-initiated phase 1 clinical trial evaluating the checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab in combination with tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy was published today in Nature Medicine.

Yale Cancer Center Perspective Highlights New Advances for NSCLC

A new publication by Yale Cancer Center highlights recent breakthrough therapies developed to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The goal of the study is to provide views on how basic science advances will impact clinical research areas to help influence how NSCLC will be managed over the coming decade.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for August 11, 2021

Current advances include insights into anti-tumor responses, a targeted therapy combination for biliary tract cancers, biomarkers that may predict response to DNA damage repair inhibitors, a “virtual biopsy” using artificial intelligence to characterize tumors, new targeted and immunotherapy approaches for pancreatic cancer, understanding the impact of TP53 mutations on acute myeloid leukemia treatments, as well as a new strategy to overcome treatment-resistant KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

New research uncovers how cancers with common gene mutation develop resistance to targeted drugs

A new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers has given scientists their first look at the genomic landscape of tumors that have grown resistant to drugs targeting the abnormal KRASG12C protein. Their work shows that, far from adopting a common route to becoming resistant, the cells take a strikingly diverse set of avenues, often several at a time. The findings, reported online today in the New England Journal of Medicine, underscore the need for new drugs that inhibit KRAS differently than current agents do.

Targeted Therapy Pralsetinib Safely and Effectively Treats Lung and Thyroid Cancers with RET Alterations

Results from the multi-cohort Phase I/II ARROW clinical trial, conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center researchers, showed that a once-daily dose of pralsetinib, a highly selective RET inhibitor, was safe and effective in treating patients with advanced RET fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and RET-altered thyroid cancer.