Genetic Ancestry Versus Race Can Provide Specific, Targeted Insights to Predict and Treat Many Diseases

The complex patterns of genetic ancestry uncovered from genomic data in health care systems can provide valuable insights into both genetic and environmental factors underlying many common and rare diseases, according to a team of Mount Sinai researchers.

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Liver Cancer Tumors Appear to Be Resistant to Immunotherapy in Patients With Underlying Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

Immunotherapy is not only significantly less effective in liver cancer patients who previously had a liver disease called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but actually appears to fuel tumor growth, according to a Mount Sinai study published in Nature in March. NASH affects as many as 40 million people worldwide and is associated with obesity and diabetes.

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Mount Sinai Scientists Discover an Epigenetic Mechanism Contributing to Lifelong Stress Susceptibility

An epigenetic modification that occurs in a major cell type in the brain’s reward circuitry controls how stress early in life increases susceptibility to additional stress in adulthood, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have learned.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Find that a Second Shot of COVID-19 Vaccine May Not be Necessary in Previously Infected Individuals

A single shot of one of the currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines may be sufficient to provide immunity to individuals who have previously been infected by the virus, thus eliminating the need for a second dose and helping to stretch severely limited vaccine supplies, a study from Mount Sinai has found

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Mount Sinai Venture Named to Fast Company’s Annual List of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021

Mount Sinai Health System announced today that Kantaro Biosciences, LLC, a joint venture with RenalytixAI, has been named to Fast Company’s prestigious annual list of the “World’s Most Innovative Companies” for 2021 and ranked first in the Joint Ventures category.

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Current Liver Cancer Screenings May Leave African Americans at Greater Risk

Early detection could reduce the number of African Americans dying from liver cancer, but current screening guidelines may not find cancer soon enough in this community, according to a study published in Cancer in February.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Identify Mechanisms That Are Essential for Proper Skin Development

Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that Polycomb complexes, groups of proteins that maintain gene expression patterns, are essential for proper skin development, according to a paper published in Genes & Development on February 18.

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Mount Sinai Experts Address the Biological Causes of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer

African Americans have higher rates of prostate cancer and are more likely to die from the disease than other groups in the United States, likely due to socioeconomic factors, healthcare access problems, and tumor biology.

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Mount Sinai Joins Challenge Encouraging Public to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19

The Mount Sinai Health System is joining medical centers across the United States in a grassroots effort to encourage public participation in vaccinations against COVID-19.

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Leesa M. Galatz, MD, Receives Honor from Prestigious Society for Contributions to Orthopedic Research

The Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) has named Leesa M. Galatz, MD, Professor and Chair of the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System, the recipient of the 2021 Women’s Leadership Forum Award.

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Mount Sinai-Led Team Builds First Model of the Progression of Acute Myeloid Leukemia using CRISPR

A research team led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Icahn Mount Sinai) has built the first cellular model to depict the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), from its early to late stages. By using gene editing technologies to alter genes that make cells malignant, the team was able to identify potential therapeutic targets for early disease stages. The study was reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell in February.

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Mount Sinai Health System Launches Center for Light and Health Research

The clinical research conducted through the Center will investigate how to use light to improve people’s lives by stabilizing their circadian rhythms, the natural internal clock that regulates the body’s sleep-wake cycle. Researchers will study how light, either from daylight or electric indoor light, affects circadian rhythms in various populations, from the very young to the very old, including patients with COVID-19, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and other illnesses. The goal is to help abate symptoms and improve their sleep, mental health, and cognition.

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Mount Sinai Study Finds Wearable Devices Can Detect COVID-19 Symptoms and Predict Diagnosis

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a Mount Sinai study.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Build Models Using Machine Learning Technique to Enhance Predictions of COVID-19 Outcomes

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using a machine learning technique called “federated learning” to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

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Heart Disease and COVID-19: Focusing on Exercise, Mental Health, and Nutrition are Critical for High-Risk Groups

February is American Heart Month and cardiologists from the Mount Sinai Health System are sharing tips on heart disease prevention to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and COVID-19.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Build Models Using Machine Learning Technique to Enhance Predictions of COVID-19 Outcomes

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

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Girls Who Are Emotionally Neglected or Severely Sexually Abused When Young Report Riskier Sexual Behaviors in Adolescence

Girls who are emotionally neglected or severely sexually abused early in their lives report riskier sexual behaviors during adolescence, Mount Sinai researchers report. The findings highlight the need—and suggest the potential for tailored approaches—to promote healthy sexual development in vulnerable populations.

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Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

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Mount Sinai Health System Launches Center for Psychedelic Research

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has launched a new center for psychedelics research. The Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research pursues a multipronged clinical and research approach to discovering novel and more efficacious therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and other stress-related conditions in the veteran and civilian population.

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Multi-Population Risk Scores Could Improve Risk Prediction for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Study Finds

New study illustrates how studying diverse populations can help predict patient outcomes and reduce health disparities

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Royalty Pharma Donates $1,000,000 To Support Mount Sinai’s COVID-19 Patient Care and Clinical Research

Royalty Pharma today announced a charitable contribution by Royalty Pharma in the amount of $1,000,000 to Mount Sinai Health System.

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Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of the Dubin Breast Center Raises $2.3 Million

The Dubin Breast Center of The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Mount Sinai Health System celebrated its 10th anniversary during its annual gala on Monday, December 7, 2020. The evening honored Eva Andersson-Dubin, MD, founder of the Center and a Mount Sinai trustee, and Elisa Port, MD, FACS, the Center’s Director and Chief of Breast Surgery for the Mount Sinai Health System, and raised more than $2.3 million to benefit the Dubin Breast Center. The center is part of The Tisch Cancer Institute, a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center.

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Majority of Pregnant Women Who Tested Positive for COVID-19 Were Asymptomatic, Study Finds

The majority of pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19 on arrival to the delivery room were asymptomatic, according to a new paper by Mount Sinai researchers.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Advance a Universal Influenza Virus Vaccine

A vaccine that induces immune responses to a wide spectrum of influenza virus strains and subtypes has produced strong and durable results in early-stage clinical trials in humans, Mount Sinai researchers have found.

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Go Inside the Most Innovative Minds in Science and Medicine on “Real, Smart People,” a New Podcast

Podcast from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai offers a glimpse into the real story of how science and medicine moves forward, one smart person at a time.

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Mount Sinai Doctors Opens New Location in Yonkers, New York

Mount Sinai Doctors has opened a new location in Yonkers, New York, with services that include primary care, cardiology, neurology, and gastroenterology. The new, state-of-the-art facility is 6,000 square feet and located on the ground floor of the historic Boyce Thompson Center at 1086 North Broadway.

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Potential New Therapies for Alzheimer’s Disease are Revealed through Network Modeling of Its Complex Molecular Interactions

Researchers from Mount Sinai and the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan have identified new molecular mechanisms driving late-onset Alzheimer’s Disease.

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A Novel Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Cuts LDL Cholesterol by Half in a High-Risk Patient Population, Study Shows

The investigational drug evinacumab reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol—the so-called “bad” cholesterol—by 50 percent in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia whose condition is resistant to standard treatments, a phase 2 study from the Icahn School of Medicine of Mount Sinai and other global academic sites has found.

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