Heart Attack

Cardiac Calcium Scoring Saves One Man’s Life

The imaging procedure (called a CT Calcium Scoring scan) a CT or CAT scan, is a preventive cardiovascular screening test that is painless and noninvasive and takes only 10 minutes. Electron Beam Computed Tomography (EVCT) beam detects and measures the amount of calcium in the heart’s arteries. The more calcium that is present, the greater the likelihood of developing heart disease or having a heart attack or stroke. The test provides patients and their health care providers with the most accurate available “picture” of their current risk of developing heart disease or experiencing a heart attack.

Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Election stress can hurt your heart

Election stress is in full effect and it can take a heavy toll on our heart health. Like the death of a loved one or a natural disaster, the election is on par with other traumatic episodes that can trigger heart stress and exacerbate pre-existing heart conditions.

Combined FFR and OCT Imaging Can Improve Accuracy of High-Risk Lesion Identification in Patients with Diabetes

Data from COMBINE (OCT-FFR) found that the use of FFR combined with OCT imaging can help improve the accuracy of high-risk lesion identification in patients with diabetes. Findings were reported today at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Scientists proposed a new approach to assessing platelet activation risk

Russian researchers have developed a new method for assessing individual risks of intravascular platelet activation. The latter plays a crucial role in the development of various serious clinical situations such as heart attacks and strokes. The range of circumstances that may be associated with the development of intravascular coagulation is currently actively investigated worldwide. In particular, the onset of intravascular coagulation may be triggered by temporary spikes in blood pressure.

CRF Will Hold Free Online Seminar on Heart Disease Warning Signs

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, “Get Heart Smart,” on August 24 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Ajay Kirtane, renowned academic cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar, part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on common heart disease symptoms, when to talk to your doctor, and when to seek emergency care.

New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack

Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models.

First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

Could This Plaque Identifying Toothpaste Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body – in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.

Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in patient characteristics, outcomes for coronary revascularization over 14-year period

The most common type of heart disease ― coronary artery disease ― affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart’s arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack.

New Research Supports Initial Conservative Management of Stable Coronary Artery Disease

New study results confirm that guideline-directed medical therapy is as effective as more invasive procedures at preventing death, stroke, and heart attack in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).

The study results suggest that guideline-directed medical therapy should be the initial treatment strategy for patients with stable CAD.

The study results validate the evidence-based, guideline-directed, conservative treatment approach that the cardiovascular specialists at Nuvance Health have always used to treat CAD.

Cleveland Clinic Survey: Most Americans Don’t know Heart Disease Is Leading Cause of Death in Women

A Cleveland Clinic survey finds that although heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, 68% of Americans do not know it’s the foremost killer of women.

According to the survey, many Americans incorrectly thought breast cancer was the leading cause of death in women, with men especially likely to think this (44% vs. 33%). Among Millennials, 80% could not identify heart disease as the leading cause of death in women. Heart disease accounts for one in every four deaths in the U.S.