New Research Reveals How the Heart Repairs After a Heart Attack

Immune response and the lymphatic system are central to cardiac repair after a heart attack, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute. These insights into the basic mechanisms of cardiac repair are the first step towards developing novel therapeutic approaches to preserve heart function. Findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Study points to need for substantial improvement in heart attack outcomes across high-income nations

Analysis shows substantial differences in treatment, outcomes, and efficiency in heart attack care across six high-income countries despite well-established international guidelines

U.S. heart attack death rate was among the highest, even with adherence to recommended treatments and faring well on other measures

All countries excelled in some measures, but none excelled in all, even though well-established international guidelines are readily available

Severe Heart Attack Mortality Dropped in Second Year of COVID-19 Pandemic, But Still High in Unvaccinated, New Data Shows

A newly published analysis in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology of hospitalized patients with both a severe type of heart attack called STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) and coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) infection compares clinical outcomes for these patients during the first and second years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

New Treatment Approach for Advanced Coronary Artery Disease Leads to Improved Outcomes

Study outlines better way to identify where stents are necessary

Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

Study Shows Use of Smartphone App Associated with Lower Hospital Readmission Rates for Heart Attack Survivors

Data collected from a group of 200 heart attack survivors using a smartphone app designed to navigate the recovery process, such as medication management and lifestyle changes, showed that app users experienced hospital readmission within the first 30 days of discharge at half the rate of a comparable group given standard aftercare without the app.

Bioprinted 3D Cardiac Patches Could Reverse Scar Formation, Promote Myocardial Regeneration After Heart Attacks

Myocardial infarction, or heart attacks, play a large part in heart diseases and the necrosis of cardiac tissue. In APL Bioengineering, researchers take stock of stem cell-laden 3D-bioprinted cardiac patch technologies and their efficacy as a therapeutic and regenerative approach for ischemic cardiomyopathy in reversing scar formation and promoting myocardial regeneration. They explore types of candidate stem cells that possess cardiac regenerative potential and share updates on the challenging implementation of the state-of-the-art 3D-bioprinting approach.

Lower- and higher-dose aspirin achieve similar protection and safety for people with cardiovascular disease

People with cardiovascular disease (CVD) taking aspirin to lower their chances of suffering a heart attack or stroke experienced similar health benefits, including reduced death and hospitalization for heart attack and stroke, whether they took a high or low dose of aspirin, according to a study presented today at ACC.21, the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Results from the National Cardiogenic Shock Initiative Demonstrate Significant Increase in Heart Attack Survival

The results of a large, national heart attack study show that patients with a deadly complication known as cardiogenic shock survived at a significantly higher rate when treated with a protocol developed by cardiologists at Henry Ford Hospital in collaboration with four metro Detroit hospitals.

Surprise Discovery Shows Chronic Heart Dysfunction Protects against Acute Kidney Injury

Article title: Activation of hypoxia-sensing pathways promotes renal ischemic preconditioning following myocardial infarction Authors: Andrew S. Terker, Kensuke Sasaki, Juan Pablo Arroyo, Aolei Niu, Suwan Wang, Xiaofeng Fan, Yahua Zhang, Sochinwechi Nwosisi, Ming-Zhi Zhang, Raymond C. Harris From the authors:…

New treatment shows promise in preventing heart failure after heart attack

A study in mice finds treatment with a molecule called MCB-613 repairs heart tissue after a severe heart attack, preventing damage that can lead to heart failure. The findings are being presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Cardiac Calcium Scoring Saves One Man’s Life

The imaging procedure (called a CT Calcium Scoring scan) a CT or CAT scan, is a preventive cardiovascular screening test that is painless and noninvasive and takes only 10 minutes. Electron Beam Computed Tomography (EVCT) beam detects and measures the amount of calcium in the heart’s arteries. The more calcium that is present, the greater the likelihood of developing heart disease or having a heart attack or stroke. The test provides patients and their health care providers with the most accurate available “picture” of their current risk of developing heart disease or experiencing a heart attack.

Heart Disease and COVID-19: Focusing on Exercise, Mental Health, and Nutrition are Critical for High-Risk Groups

February is American Heart Month and cardiologists from the Mount Sinai Health System are sharing tips on heart disease prevention to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and COVID-19.

Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Ultrasounds Show Impact of COVID-19 on the Heart

International study may guide therapeutic strategies in patients with and without underlying heart conditions

Fractional Flow Reserve Derived from Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography Did Not Significantly Reduce Costs But Reduced Rates of Invasive Coronary Angiography

In the FORECAST randomized clinical trial, the use of fractional flow reserve management derived from computed tomography (FFRCT) did not significantly reduce costs but did reduce the use of invasive coronary angiography (ICA).

Combined FFR and OCT Imaging Can Improve Accuracy of High-Risk Lesion Identification in Patients with Diabetes

Data from COMBINE (OCT-FFR) found that the use of FFR combined with OCT imaging can help improve the accuracy of high-risk lesion identification in patients with diabetes. Findings were reported today at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Pilot Randomized Trial Demonstrates that PCI of Non-Flow-Limiting Vulnerable Plaques May be Safe with Favorable Long-Term Clinical Outcomes

New data from PROSPECT ABSORB, a pilot randomized trial of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in native coronary arteries, found that PCI was safe, substantially enlarged follow-up lumen areas, and was associated with favorable long-term clinical outcomes.

Clear Link Between Heart Disease and COVID-19, But Long-Term Implications Unknown, Researchers Find in Review of Published Studies

In a prospectus review published this week in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Kirk U. Knowlton MD, from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, examined more than 100 published studies related to COVID-19 and its effects on the heart.

Scientists proposed a new approach to assessing platelet activation risk

Russian researchers have developed a new method for assessing individual risks of intravascular platelet activation. The latter plays a crucial role in the development of various serious clinical situations such as heart attacks and strokes. The range of circumstances that may be associated with the development of intravascular coagulation is currently actively investigated worldwide. In particular, the onset of intravascular coagulation may be triggered by temporary spikes in blood pressure.

CRF Will Hold Free Online Seminar on Heart Disease Warning Signs

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, “Get Heart Smart,” on August 24 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Ajay Kirtane, renowned academic cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar, part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on common heart disease symptoms, when to talk to your doctor, and when to seek emergency care.

Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed “good cholesterol” because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack

Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models.

Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed “good cholesterol” because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.