Lower- and higher-dose aspirin achieve similar protection and safety for people with cardiovascular disease

People with cardiovascular disease (CVD) taking aspirin to lower their chances of suffering a heart attack or stroke experienced similar health benefits, including reduced death and hospitalization for heart attack and stroke, whether they took a high or low dose of aspirin, according to a study presented today at ACC.21, the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Results from the National Cardiogenic Shock Initiative Demonstrate Significant Increase in Heart Attack Survival

The results of a large, national heart attack study show that patients with a deadly complication known as cardiogenic shock survived at a significantly higher rate when treated with a protocol developed by cardiologists at Henry Ford Hospital in collaboration with four metro Detroit hospitals.

Surprise Discovery Shows Chronic Heart Dysfunction Protects against Acute Kidney Injury

Article title: Activation of hypoxia-sensing pathways promotes renal ischemic preconditioning following myocardial infarction Authors: Andrew S. Terker, Kensuke Sasaki, Juan Pablo Arroyo, Aolei Niu, Suwan Wang, Xiaofeng Fan, Yahua Zhang, Sochinwechi Nwosisi, Ming-Zhi Zhang, Raymond C. Harris From the authors:…

New treatment shows promise in preventing heart failure after heart attack

A study in mice finds treatment with a molecule called MCB-613 repairs heart tissue after a severe heart attack, preventing damage that can lead to heart failure. The findings are being presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Cardiac Calcium Scoring Saves One Man’s Life

The imaging procedure (called a CT Calcium Scoring scan) a CT or CAT scan, is a preventive cardiovascular screening test that is painless and noninvasive and takes only 10 minutes. Electron Beam Computed Tomography (EVCT) beam detects and measures the amount of calcium in the heart’s arteries. The more calcium that is present, the greater the likelihood of developing heart disease or having a heart attack or stroke. The test provides patients and their health care providers with the most accurate available “picture” of their current risk of developing heart disease or experiencing a heart attack.

Heart Disease and COVID-19: Focusing on Exercise, Mental Health, and Nutrition are Critical for High-Risk Groups

February is American Heart Month and cardiologists from the Mount Sinai Health System are sharing tips on heart disease prevention to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and COVID-19.

Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Ultrasounds Show Impact of COVID-19 on the Heart

International study may guide therapeutic strategies in patients with and without underlying heart conditions

Fractional Flow Reserve Derived from Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography Did Not Significantly Reduce Costs But Reduced Rates of Invasive Coronary Angiography

In the FORECAST randomized clinical trial, the use of fractional flow reserve management derived from computed tomography (FFRCT) did not significantly reduce costs but did reduce the use of invasive coronary angiography (ICA).

Combined FFR and OCT Imaging Can Improve Accuracy of High-Risk Lesion Identification in Patients with Diabetes

Data from COMBINE (OCT-FFR) found that the use of FFR combined with OCT imaging can help improve the accuracy of high-risk lesion identification in patients with diabetes. Findings were reported today at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Pilot Randomized Trial Demonstrates that PCI of Non-Flow-Limiting Vulnerable Plaques May be Safe with Favorable Long-Term Clinical Outcomes

New data from PROSPECT ABSORB, a pilot randomized trial of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in native coronary arteries, found that PCI was safe, substantially enlarged follow-up lumen areas, and was associated with favorable long-term clinical outcomes.

Clear Link Between Heart Disease and COVID-19, But Long-Term Implications Unknown, Researchers Find in Review of Published Studies

In a prospectus review published this week in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Kirk U. Knowlton MD, from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, examined more than 100 published studies related to COVID-19 and its effects on the heart.

Scientists proposed a new approach to assessing platelet activation risk

Russian researchers have developed a new method for assessing individual risks of intravascular platelet activation. The latter plays a crucial role in the development of various serious clinical situations such as heart attacks and strokes. The range of circumstances that may be associated with the development of intravascular coagulation is currently actively investigated worldwide. In particular, the onset of intravascular coagulation may be triggered by temporary spikes in blood pressure.

CRF Will Hold Free Online Seminar on Heart Disease Warning Signs

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, “Get Heart Smart,” on August 24 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Ajay Kirtane, renowned academic cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar, part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on common heart disease symptoms, when to talk to your doctor, and when to seek emergency care.

Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed “good cholesterol” because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack

Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models.

Better Measure of ‘Good Cholesterol’ Can Gauge Heart Attack And Stroke Risk in Some Populations

DALLAS – June 22, 2020 – For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed “good cholesterol” because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls. People with higher HDL cholesterol levels tend to have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, studies have shown.

First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

Study Explores Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Tissue Repair after Heart Attack

Article title: CDC-derived extracellular vesicles reprogram inflammatory macrophages to an arginase 1-dependent pro-angiogenic phenotype Authors: Kyle I. Mentkowski, Asma Mursleen, Jonathan D. Snitzer, Lindsey M. Euscher, Jennifer K. Lang From the authors: “Our study was designed to gain mechanistic insight into the…

Precision medicine guides choice of better drug therapy in severe heart disease

Is personalized medicine cost-effective? Researchers have answered that question for one medical treatment, genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndrome patients with PCI. Their study uses pharmacogenomics and economic analysis of real-world clinical data.

Heart attack, stroke risk declines among people with diabetes

The rate of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications has improved among people with diabetes over the past 20 years, narrowing the gap in cardiovascular mortality rates between individuals with and without diabetes, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

UC San Diego Health Emergency Departments Equipped to Safely Treat all Patients During Global Pandemic

With increased awareness and fear of COVID-19, some patients have refrained from going to the Emergency Department, even when most needed. Doctors at UC San Diego Health wish to reassure the public that fear of coronavirus should not deter patients…

Could This Plaque Identifying Toothpaste Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body – in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.

Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in patient characteristics, outcomes for coronary revascularization over 14-year period

The most common type of heart disease ― coronary artery disease ― affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart’s arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack.