Shrinking Waveforms on Electrocardiograms Predict Worsening Health and Death of Hospitalized COVID-19 and Influenza Patients

Spotting changes in the heart’s electrical activity may prompt more-aggressive treatment and monitoring.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

– COVID-19 NEWS: Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Shows Vaccine Likely Protects People with HIV
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Documents Stroke Risk in Cardiac Assist Device
– CBD Products May Help People with Epilepsy Better Tolerate Anti-Seizure Medications

Batteryless Pacemaker Could Use Heart’s Energy for Power

The cardiac pacemaker of the future could be powered by the heart itself, according to researchers in China. Current cardiac pacemakers use a battery power supply and leads to keep hearts beating regularly. Yi Zhiran and his group are investing batteryless powering and leadless pacing, harvesting kinetic energy from the heart to power the lifesaving device. The energy is harvested by the buckling of the encapsulated structure of the pacemaker, creating buckled piezoelectric energy.

20-year Mayo Clinic study suggests return to play is manageable for athletes with most genetic heart diseases

Receiving the diagnosis of a genetic heart disease such as long QT syndrome, which can cause sudden cardiac death, has long been a game-ender for young athletes. But a 20-year study at Mayo Clinic following such athletes who were allowed to return to play suggests that the risks can be managed through a shared decision-making process. The retrospective study findings will be presented at the annual meeting of the Heart Rhythm Society on Tuesday, July 27, and simultaneously published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Electric Signals Between Individual Cardiac Cells Regulate Heartbeat

In Biophysics Reviews, researchers provide an update on how electrical impulses in the heart travel from cell to cell. The connections between cells forming the low resistance pathway and facilitating the current flow are called gap junctions. Each consists of many channels, which are formed when specific proteins from one cell dock and fuse to the proteins from another cell. The scientists delve into the properties of gap junctions and their constituent proteins.

Cardiologists at Henry Ford Are First in U.S. to Implant New Device to Treat Heart Failure, Improve Kidney Function

Cardiologists at Henry Ford Hospital are first in the U.S. and second in the world to implant a circulatory support device that is being investigated in a clinical trial for patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and worsening kidney function, a condition known as cardiorenal syndrome.

Henry Ford Hospital Cardiologist to Perform Procedure During Worldwide Live Aid Event

A world-renowned interventional cardiologist at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit who specializes in catheter-based treatments for heart blockages will perform a live procedure during a 16-hour marathon of cases taking place around the world on May 6.

Genetic testing proves beneficial in prescribing effective blood thinners

A new research paper funded in part by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) shows a clear advantage of genetic testing in helping health care providers choose the appropriate anti-platelet drug. Testing helps determine if a patient carries genetic variants in CYP2C19 that cause loss of its function. These variants interfere with the body’s ability to metabolize and activate clopidogrel, an anti-platelet medication.

Using Stimuli-Responsive Biomaterials to Understand Heart Development, Disease

The heart cannot regenerate new tissue, because cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells, do not divide after birth. However, researchers have now developed a shape memory polymer to grow cardiomyocytes. Raising the material’s temperature turned the polymer’s flat surface into nanowrinkles, which promoted cardiomyocyte alignment. The research is part of the growing field of mechanobiology, which investigates how physical forces between cells and changes in their mechanical properties contribute to development, cell differentiation, physiology, and disease.

American Heart Month: FSU experts available to comment on heart disease topics

By: Kelsey Klopfenstein | Published: February 3, 2021 | 1:14 pm | SHARE: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Someone has a heart attack every 39 seconds, and cardiovascular disease claims more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined, according to the American Heart Association’s 2021 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

Media Advisory: Register for STS Annual Meeting and Press Briefings

Credentialed press representatives are invited to attend The Society of Thoracic Surgeons VIRTUAL 57th Annual Meeting. This interactive, fully digital experience—expected to be unlike anything that cardiothoracic surgery has experienced to date—will feature thought-provoking lectures, practice-changing science, and cutting-edge techniques and technologies.

Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

One-size-fits-all is no fit for heart health

From Weight Watchers to wearable tech – wherever we look, there are messages encouraging us to stay fit and healthy. But diets and training methods aside, when it comes to heart health, research from the University of South Australia shows that a far more personalised approach is needed…and it all starts with your genes.

Hopelessness in heart patients study to factor in COVID-19

A University of Illinois Chicago research study on how to improve care for heart disease patients struggling with hopelessness has been supplemented by the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, to determine whether the study intervention called “Heart Up!” limits the negative impact of COVID-19 shelter-in-place and physical distancing measures on health outcomes.

Largest pharmacogenetic clinical trial in cardiology shows potential benefit in individualized approach to anti-platelet therapy

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Heart patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or stent placement― nonsurgical procedures to improve blood flow to the heart ― are typically prescribed anti-platelet therapy to avoid blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. New research from the international TAILOR-PCI trial, the largest pharmacogenetics clinical trial in cardiology, suggests that genetic testing could potentially be a useful tool to help select antiplatelet medication. Pharmacogenetics is the use of a patient’s genetic makeup in prescribing treatments that are likely to be most successful.

Study Shows Socioeconomic Status Linked to Heart Failure Mortality in United States

A variety of treatments exist to address heart disease, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis. A new study from University Hospitals showed that a person’s address can help predict their chance of mortality from heart disease.

Baylor Scott & White Health Again Recognized as Most Awarded Not-for-profit Health System in Texas by U.S. News & World Report

In the midst of the extraordinary health challenge presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, Baylor Scott & White Health remains committed to quality, safe care and helping Texas communities navigate the uncertainty of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Today, this commitment to safety and quality is recognized as U.S. News & World Report releases its 2020-2021 Best Hospitals list.

University of Miami Launches COVID-19 Heart Program

A new COVID-19 Heart Program developed by cardiologists with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is addressing the varied heart issues stemming from the pandemic with comprehensive screenings and evaluations in a safe clinical setting. It also incorporates the latest findings from UM cardiology researchers studying how the coronavirus can affect the heart and its surrounding tissues.

MacNeal Hospital Launches First Clinical Trial in Illinois of Novel Monitoring Device for Congestive Heart Failure Patients

MacNeal Hospital is the first hospital in Illinois to participate in a national, randomized clinical trial using daily vital signs and lung pressure measurement to manage patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). The PROACTIVE-HF trial utilizes a new monitoring system, coupled with a pressure sensor, implanted directly into a blood vessel in the lung. This system provides information that is recorded and transmitted over a cellular or Wi-Fi connection to a patient’s provider, allowing for medication changes, if necessary, to prevent further health deterioration or hospitalization.

Foxglove plants produce heart medicine. Can science do it better?

Biologist Zhen Wang’s team recently published a pair of papers detailing characteristics of cardiac glycosides in two foxglove species. “This kind of study is important because we first have to know the accurate structure of natural compounds before we can explore their medicinal effects,” she says.

Mayo researchers create, test AI to improve EKG testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

An approach based on artificial intelligence (AI) may allow EKGs to be used to screen for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the future. With hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart walls become thick and may interfere with the heart’s ability to function properly. The disease also predisposes some patients to potentially fatal abnormal rhythms. Current EKG technology has limited diagnostic yield for this disease.

Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in patient characteristics, outcomes for coronary revascularization over 14-year period

The most common type of heart disease ― coronary artery disease ― affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart’s arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack.