Gut Bacteria May be One Culprit for Increase of Colorectal Cancer in Younger People

A bacteria typically linked to periodontal disease, Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nuc), could play an important role in the rising incidence of colorectal cancer in people under the age of 45. Another type of bacteria, Moraxella osloensis, has been found in colorectal cancer tumors at a nearly four-fold higher rate in people over 75 than in those under 45 years of age, pointing out how differences in the bacteria that comprise what is known as the body’s microbiome could affect cancer outcomes to varying degrees.
These are the preliminary findings of an ongoing study that will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco from January 23-25, 2020.

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‘Are Noncommunicable Diseases Communicable?’ Rutgers Experts Available to Discuss Paper in Science Today

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A MOTHER’S BUGS

-Newborn mice derive protective antibodies from their mothers’ microbiota
-Antibodies derived from mothers’ microbiota ward off both localized and widespread systemic infections by the bacterium E. coli
-Study points to the role of maternal microbes in offspring protection and neonatal immunity
-Findings can inform development of microbe-based therapies against infectious diarrhea in infants

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UCI biologists spearhead creation of Microbiome Centers Consortium

Irvine, Calif., Dec. 23, 2019 — From probing the ocean depths to deciphering human health mysteries, researchers across scientific disciplines are increasingly including microbiomes in their work. The Microbiome Centers Consortium has been launched by two University of California, Irvine School of Bioscience faculty members to advance growth in this life science field, increasingly recognized as relevant to many other disciplines and industrial applications.

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Articles on Chronic Hexavalent Chromium Exposure, Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles, and Bisphenol A Featured in December 2019 Toxicological Sciences

The December 2019 issue of Toxicological Sciences features research on the leading edge of toxicology, including in the areas of carcinogenesis, developmental and reproductive toxicology, and more.

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Model probes possible treatments for neonatal infection, a common cause of infant death

In a new model for neonatal late-onset sepsis, or LOS, researchers show that disrupting the normal maturation of gut microbes can make newborn mouse pups highly susceptible to LOS. Giving the pups specific protective bacteria before a challenge with invasive bacteria prevented the deadly infection.

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