What if some stress actually protects your body?

Stress has been linked to all sorts of serious health issues, from insomnia to high blood pressure, obesity and even heart disease. But it’s generally acknowledged that some stress can also be helpful, like when someone’s chasing a work deadline. But what if some level of stress can actually protect the body? A new study by researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, with findings published Sept. 26 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests the immune system may benefit from a measure of stress.

Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation for IBS-C, Infliximab Retreatment for Crohn’s Disease Featured in September Issue of AJG

The September issue of AJG highlights new clinical science, including a potential therapy to improve IBS-C symptoms, reintroduction of infliximab for Crohn’s disease, and population-based data to examine incidence and mortality of certain GI and hepatology diseases.

Smartphone App to Assess Stool Form, Rural-Urban Disparities in Cirrhosis Mortality, Lung Infection Risk in Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis in July Issue of AJG

The July issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology highlights new clinical science including using a smartphone app to assess stool form, rural-urban disparities in cirrhosis mortality, and lung infection risk in severe alcohol-related hepatitis. This issue also includes articles on pediatric IBD, therapy options for Crohn’s disease, a novel endoscopic suturing device, proton pump inhibitors, and more.

Foodborne fungus impairs intestinal wound healing in Crohn’s disease

A foodborne fungus that is harmless to most people exacerbates gastrointestinal symptoms in people with Crohn’s disease by preventing intestinal ulcers from healing, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Cleveland Clinic. The findings suggest that antifungal medications or dietary interventions may help alleviate the symptoms of Crohn’s.

Cleveland Clinic Researchers Discover Microbial Infection That Impairs Healing in Crohn’s Disease

A Cleveland Clinic-led team of researchers has discovered an infection that prevents healing in Crohn’s disease. According to study results published in Science, a type of yeast commonly found in cheese and processed meat is elevated in areas of unhealed wounds in Crohn’s disease patients, a discovery that may point to much-needed new treatment or prevention approaches for the common inflammatory bowel disease. The work was led by Thaddeus Stappenbeck, M.D., PhD., chair of Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute’s Department of Inflammation and Immunity.

Genetic Risk for Fatal Blood Clots Identified in IBD Patients

Blood clots are the biggest cause of death in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ─ ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In a retrospective study recently published in the journal Gastroenterology, Cedars-Sinai investigators found that a combination of rare and common genetic variants in some IBD patients significantly increased their risk of developing clot-causing thromboembolic diseases.