Bat Tick Found for the First Time in New Jersey

A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a “soft” tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of “hard” ticks.

UCLA team leading COVID-19 epidemiology study among animal health care professionals

A team led by Anne Rimoin, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and Director of the UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, has just launched an epidemiologic study to understand occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and other pathogens in high-risk populations, including veterinary medicine and animal care/welfare workers.

Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States.

Rutgers Extension Agent Can Discuss How to Protect Against Ticks, Lyme Disease

New Brunswick, N.J. (June 15, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Amy Rowe is available for interviews on how to protect you and your family from ticks and Lyme disease, including how to reduce tick habitat around your home. “Right now…

Ask the expert: MSU veterinarian dispels myths about pets and COVID-19

Since first hearing about the COVID-19 outbreak in China, media outlets around the world have reported on strains of the virus originating in animals, on pets testing positive for the virus and most recently, on a tiger testing positive for COVID-19 at the Bronx Zoo. Annette O’Connor – chairperson of the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and professor of Epidemiology at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine – says that there are seven different types of coronaviruses and that the Centers for Disease Control doesn’t believe the COVID-19 strain can be transmitted to domestic animals.

Rutgers Experts Available to Discuss Gardening During COVID-19 Crisis

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 7, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Michelle Infante-Casella and other Rutgers faculty and staff are available for interviews on home gardening during the COVID-19 pandemic. In each county in New Jersey, the Agriculture and Natural…

COVID-19: Disaster researchers can comment on infants, at-risk populations, chronically ill and animals

The University of Delaware’s Disaster Research Center includes several core faculty members who can discuss various aspects of the COVID-19 health crisis: Sarah DeYoung, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice: Can talk about companion animals and COVID-19, as well as…

Study Suggests Early-Life Exposure to Dogs May Lessen Risk of Developing Schizophrenia

Ever since humans domesticated the dog, the faithful, obedient and protective animal has provided its owner with companionship and emotional well-being. Now, a study from Johns Hopkins Medicine suggests that being around “man’s best friend” from an early age may have a health benefit as well — lessening the chance of developing schizophrenia as an adult.