Old Habit-Controlling Neurons May Also Help the Brain Learn New Tricks

In a study of rodents, scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai discovered that a part of the brain traditionally thought to control typing the old habits may also play a critical role in learning the new actions. The results, published on August 25th in Nature Communications, suggest that this process involves a delicate balance in the activity of two neighboring neural circuits: one dedicated to new actions and the other to old habits

Ohio State Among First In Nation To Implant New Deep-Brain Stimulation Device

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The team of neurologists and neurosurgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and its Neurological Institute are among the first in the nation to implant a new deep-brain stimulation (DBS) device that will help improve the quality of life of patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Research Highlights from 2021 ACSM Virtual Annual Meeting: Exercise in Regenerative Medicine

The 2021 Virtual ACSM Basic Science World Congress focuses on regenerative medicine. Chaired by Marcas M. Bamman, Ph.D., FACSM, from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, this world congress brings together researchers to discuss cutting-edge science in this rapidly developing field.

Henry Ford Health System First in the U.S. to Offer Next Generation Deep Brain Stimulation System For Parkinson’s Disease

The Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center at Henry Ford Health System was the first in the United States to offer a new FDA-approved device to help treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Neurosurgeon Jason Schwalb, M.D. surgically implanted the Vercise Genus™ Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) System, which stimulates a targeted region of the brain through implanted leads that are placed in the brain.

Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes

In older people with type 1 diabetes, damage to the retina may be linked to memory problems and other cognitive conditions.BOSTON – (December 31, 2020) – As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes.

Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington’s and other diseases

Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease.

The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington’s disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background.

Parkinson’s Disease May Start Before Birth

People who develop Parkinson’s disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to EMBARGOED Cedars-Sinai research that will publish Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Medicine. The research points to a drug that potentially might help correct these disease processes.

NINDS Awards Coriell Institute for Medical Research $7.7 Million Contract

The five-year award will support the NINDS Human Genetics Resource Center, a collection of biological samples and corresponding demographic, clinical, and genetic data made available to qualified researchers around the world. This repository includes samples from subjects with various diseases – such as cerebrovascular disease, dystonia, epilepsy, motor neuron disease, parkinsonism, and Tourette Syndrome.