Study: Obesity raises the risk of gum disease by inflating growth of bone-destroying cells

Chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells that break down bone tissue, including the bone that holds teeth in place, according to new University at Buffalo research that sought to improve understanding of the connection between obesity and gum disease.

In Patients with Fatty Liver, Bariatric Surgery Decreases Risk of Progression of Liver Disease, Serious Heart Complications

A Cleveland Clinic study shows that patients with obesity and advanced fatty liver disease who had bariatric weight loss surgery significantly lowered their future risk of liver disease complications and serious cardiovascular disease compared with patients who did not have surgery.

Older Age, Chronic Co-Morbidities Associated with More Severe COVID Disease in Children

The study, “Factors Associated with COVID-19 Disease Severity in U.S. Children,” published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, determined the factors associated with severe disease and poor health outcomes among children presenting to the hospital with COVID. These included older age and chronic co-morbidities such as obesity, diabetes and neurologic conditions, among others.

Sending Out An SOS to Protect The Heart

DALLAS – Aug. 20, 2021 – A stress signal received by the heart from fat could help protect against cardiac damage induced by obesity, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The finding, published online in Cell Metabolism, could help explain the “obesity paradox,” a phenomenon in which obese individuals have better short- and medium-term cardiovascular disease prognoses compared with those who are lean, but with ultimately worse long-term outcomes.

Longest study of its kind reveals how gender-affirming hormone therapies impact obesity among U.S. transgender individuals

Researchers conducted the largest and longest observational study to date, using multiple body weight measurements among a racially and ethnically diverse population of gender diverse individuals treated at an academic medical center and non-profit community health center in Washington, D.C. The findings suggest that transgender patients taking gender-affirming hormone therapy should be monitored for changes in body weight, body mass index and for complications that may accompany high body weight, such as cardiovascular disease.

Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

New Study Finds Weight-Loss Surgery Beneficial to Those with Mild to Moderate Obesity

Weight-loss surgery improves or resolves diseases including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure and can lead to significant and durable weight loss for many people, but the operation has largely been restricted to those with severe obesity, which means about 75 to 100 pounds overweight or a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or higher with an obesity-related disease.

The Latest Science on Staying Healthy During Pregnancy

Healthy habits are particularly important during pregnancy. Four new studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE look at how supplements, eating habits and physical activity can affect various aspects of health during pregnancy.

How Kids Eat: Five New Insights on Daily Habits and Childhood Obesity

What we eat during childhood can affect the health of individuals—and populations—for years to come. As rates of childhood obesity continue to rise, five studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into the diets of children and teens around the world.

Smartphone Use Associated with Unhealthy Eating and Overweight in Teens

Even moderate smartphone use may influence teens’ diet and weight, according to a new study of more than 53,000 Korean adolescents. Teens who used a smartphone for more than 2 hours per day were significantly more likely to eat more junk food and fewer fruits and vegetables than those spending less time on their phone. Teens spending more than 3 hours per day on a smartphone were significantly more likely to be overweight or obese.

June 5 Research Highlights for ACSM Annual Meeting

ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference takes place virtually from June 1 to 5 with programming covering the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity. View program highlights.

Researchers find that blocking a protein in liver cells protects against insulin resistance and fatty liver disease

A new multi-institution study led by a team of researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine demonstrated that blocking a protein called ABCB10 in liver cells protects against high blood sugar and fatty liver disease in obese mice. ABCB10 activity also prompted insulin resistance in human liver cells.

A Crisis of Comfort

In “The Comfort Crisis,” UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Pain receptors linked to the generation of energy-burning fat cells: implications for obesity therapy

A new source of energy expending brown fat cells has been uncovered by researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center, which they say points towards potential new therapeutic options for obesity. According to the new report, published in Nature Metabolism >on 12 March 2021, the key lies in the expression of a receptor called Trpv1 (temperature-sensitive ion channel transient receptor potential cation subfamily V member 1) — a protein known to sense noxious stimuli, including pain and temperature.