Vigorous Exercise May Preserve Cognition in High-Risk Patients With Hypertension

People with high blood pressure have a higher risk of cognitive impairment, including dementia, but a new study from researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine suggests that engaging in vigorous physical activity more than once a week can lower that risk.

GoodWalk Thailand: Designing “Walkable City” Revitalizing the Economy, Enhancing Quality of Life for City Dwellers

Chula joins hands with the Thai Health Promotion Foundation (ThaiHealth) to design “Walkable City” using the GoodWalk Score as the criteria for selecting the pilot area to be developed as Walkable City in Bangkok as well as many cities around the country. The plan is to help reduce pollution, revitalize tourism, and the local economy while enhancing the quality of life and health for city dwellers.

More than 7,500 Daily Steps Prior to Surgery Is Associated with Lower Risk of Postoperative Complications

Patients who recorded more walking activity prior to surgery, regardless of complexity of the operation or their health status, showed 51% reduced odds for postoperative complications than less active patients, according to research findings being presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2023.

For Type 2 Diabetics Who Exercise, Some Approaches Are Better Than Others

An analysis on the positive effects of exercise on blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes shows that while all exercise helps, certain activities – and their timing – are extremely good for people’s health. The study, published in The American Journal of Medicine, provides a comprehensive but straightforward summary of the benefits of exercise on controlling blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes.

Wearable activity trackers accelerate hospital patient recovery

Fitbits, Garmins or Apple Watches, whatever your preference, wearable activity trackers could help patients recover faster during a hospitalisation, potentially easing some pressures on Australia’s overburdened hospital system, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

Sex Differences in Fat Storage during Military Training Help Women Preserve Lean Mass

Article title: Sex differences in body composition and serum metabolome responses to sustained, physical training suggest enhanced fat oxidation in women compared with men Authors: Meaghan E. Beckner, Lauren Thompson, Patrick N. Radcliffe, Rebecca Cherian, Marques Wilson, Nicholas Barringer, Lee…

More Steps, Moderate Physical Activity Cuts Dementia, Cognitive Impairment Risk

UC San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science study: senior women were less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment or dementia if they did more daily walking and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Study Explores Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults at the Cellular Level

Aging and related diseases are associated with alterations in oxidative status and low-grade inflammation, as well as a decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is a functional mechanism by which cells attempt to protect themselves against ER stress. Researchers analyzed these proteins in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of elderly subjects and used computer simulation to predict the key proteins associated with these biomolecules underlying physiological adaptations to exercise. They collected blood samples about five to six days before and after the training period and analyzed various oxidative stress biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The study takes research one step further in helping to elucidate the benefits of exercise in this population.

Substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds report long-term COVID-19 complications

A substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds with severe COVID-19 illness are reporting long-term complications from the virus, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

NAU research collaborative receives $21M grant to continue pioneering work into health equity in the Southwest

A groundbreaking research collaborative at Northern Arizona University received another $21 million grant to continue its work to promote health equity and study health disparities among diverse populations of the American Southwest.

JMIR Diabetes | Digital Diabetes Prevention Program on Weight and Physical Activity

JMIR Publications recently published “A 12-Month Follow-Up of the Effects of a Digital Diabetes Prevention Program (VP Transform for Prediabetes) on Weight and Physical Activity Among Adults With Prediabetes: Secondary Analysis” in JMIR Diabetes which reported that previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of a diabetes prevention program (DPP) in lifestyle modifications that can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes among individuals at risk.

Researchers Suggest Continued Heart and Lung Monitoring after COVID-19 for People with Highly Physical Jobs

Article title: The effect of medium-term recovery status after COVID-19 illness on cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in a physically active adult population Authors: Peter Ladlow, Oliver O’Sullivan, Alexander N. Bennett, Robert Barker-Davies, Andrew Houston, Rebecca Chamley, Samantha May, Daniel Mills, Dominic…

Research Shows Alarming Increases in Deaths from Alcoholic Cirrhosis in the U.S.

Researchers conducted an original research study utilizing the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (WONDER) to compare trends in mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in the U.S. in 1999 with those 20 years later in 2019.

More greens, less sugar and fries: Abriendo Caminos study finds promising results

A study evaluating the effect of the Abriendo Caminos program on dietary behaviors of Hispanic children found youth participants consumed sugar-sweetened beverages, french fries and fast food less frequently and ate vegetables more often after the six-week workshop series.

Sitting more linked to increased feelings of depression, anxiety

During the initial COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, a lot of people suddenly became more sedentary as they adhered to stay-at-home orders or opted to self-isolate. Recently published research found people who continued to spend a higher amount of time sitting in the weeks following were likely to have higher symptoms of depression. A closer investigation into this association could play a role in helping people improve their mental health.

Older Adults Need More Than Clichés Like ‘Exercise is Good for You’ to Stay Active

More than 80 percent of adults get the recommended 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week. Moreover, 40 percent of Americans 75 and older are entirely inactive. Little is known about factors associated with increasing, sustaining, or declining physical activity levels over time. A study explored what drives older adults from diverse backgrounds to start or sustain physical activity and what stops them. The bottom line: knowledge and old clichés alone aren’t enough to keep them moving.

Active Workstations Encourage Seated Workers to Sit Less, Move More

Prolonged workplace sitting has emerged as a major risk factor for chronic diseases. Standing and treadmill desks have become popular solutions among office workers to decrease workplace sitting. However, little is known about the long-term success of these desks in…

Exercise Reduces Medication for Metabolic Syndrome Management

Chances are that as we age, we will need to correct our blood pressure, blood sugar or blood fat with the help of medication. Thanks to such medication, an individual’s health span is extended by reducing cardiovascular and metabolic diseases…

Arlington, Va., Named ‘Fittest City’ in 2021 American Fitness Index Ranking of Top 100

CSM and the Anthem Foundation release the 2021 American Fitness Index, ranking America’s 100 largest cities on health behaviors, chronic disease and community infrastructure indicators. Arlington, Va. earned the title of “America’s Fittest City.” Minneapolis, Minnesota; Seattle, Washington; Denver, Colorado; Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, D.C.; St. Paul, Minnesota; Irvine, California; Portland, Oregon; and Atlanta, Georgia; round out the top 10 fittest cities.

Penn State Health one of six health systems in nation to add physical activity as a vital sign

When visiting a health care provider, most people expect to have their body temperature, pulse, weight and blood pressure measured. Some Penn State Health patients can also anticipate questions about how much they exercise. The health system is one of six in the United States and the only one in Pennsylvania to incorporate physical activity as a vital sign.