Arlington, Va., Named ‘Fittest City’ in 2021 American Fitness Index Ranking of Top 100

CSM and the Anthem Foundation release the 2021 American Fitness Index, ranking America’s 100 largest cities on health behaviors, chronic disease and community infrastructure indicators. Arlington, Va. earned the title of “America’s Fittest City.” Minneapolis, Minnesota; Seattle, Washington; Denver, Colorado; Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, D.C.; St. Paul, Minnesota; Irvine, California; Portland, Oregon; and Atlanta, Georgia; round out the top 10 fittest cities.

Penn State Health one of six health systems in nation to add physical activity as a vital sign

When visiting a health care provider, most people expect to have their body temperature, pulse, weight and blood pressure measured. Some Penn State Health patients can also anticipate questions about how much they exercise. The health system is one of six in the United States and the only one in Pennsylvania to incorporate physical activity as a vital sign.

WVU professor: Personal desire, not shaming, should serve as motivator to arise from the unhealthy pits of COVID

George Kelley, a professor in West Virginia University’s School of Public Health, said he believes the key now is to push forward from the pandemic and into healthier lifestyles.

ACSM / Anthem American Fitness Index to Reveal 2021 Fittest City

For more than a decade, the evidence-based ACSM / Anthem American Fitness Index has recognized the critical role physical activity and city infrastructure play in a city’s overall health and fitness. ACSM and the Anthem Foundation will release the 2021 Fitness Index rankings at 7 a.m. EDT on July 13.

ACSM Annual Meeting Research Highlights for June 3

ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference takes place virtually from June 1 to 5 with programming covering the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity.

ACSM Annual Meeting Research Highlights for June 1

ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference kicks off June 1 with programming covering the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity. View program highlights.

Exercise to Improve Health: Fast, Furious and Infrequent or Slow, Steady and Sustainable?

Exercise is well-known to reduce the risk of chronic diseases like hypertension, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. While moderate-intensity continuous exercise (END) has traditionally been recommended to achieve these meaningful benefits, the time-effective alternative of sprint interval training (SIT)…

Journalists: Be our guest at the 2021 Virtual ACSM Research Conference

Gain story ideas and learn about cutting-edge science at ACSM’s comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference that covers the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity.

Greening the Earth and Improving Health through Human-Powered Transport

Driving has become a way of life for people throughout the world. However, heavy reliance on gas-powered vehicles contributes to three problems (global climate change, air pollution and physical inactivity) that result in millions of deaths per year. As developing…

Get Off the Couch! Replacing Sedentary Time with Physical Activity or Sleep Improves Heart Health

National and international guidelines recommend replacing the amount of time spent being sedentary with physical activity to improve health. This message is especially important in the face of COVID-19, as overall sedentary behaviors have increased substantially. In fact, research suggests…

ACSM and Technogym Partner to Promote Physical Activity, Improve Quality of Life

ACSM and Technogym renew long-standing partnership to promote the importance of physical activity and combat chronic disease and illness. The agreement focuses on expanding impact of global Exercise is Medicine initiative.

Effectiveness of HIIE versus MICT in Improving Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Health and Disease

A healthy lifestyle is composed primarily of regular structured physical activity (i.e., exercise). As a result, there is vast research into the clinical benefits of exercise, in most cases showing a better effect than drug interventions. Current physical activity guidelines…

Does More Physical Activity and Less TV Viewing Reduce the Risk of Death?

Insufficient physical activity and sedentary behavior are both associated with higher risk of chronic disease and death. However, the long-term benefits of interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sitting time are unknown as randomized controlled trials are often infeasible…

Reduced Sitting Time Improves Blood Flow in Brain and Legs

During a regular day, the average person sits for eight to 10 hours. These high levels of sitting time seem linked to an increased risk for both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. First, researchers found that three hours of sitting results…

Attenuated Rapid-Onset Vasodilation to Forearm Muscle Contraction in Black Men

Kaur and colleagues reported that rapid onset vasodilation induced by a single contraction of the forearm muscles was significantly attenuated in non-Hispanic Black men, compared to white men, and this attenuation was evident even at low intensity muscle contractions. The…

Quick, Frequent Exercise Breaks Improve Blood Vessel Health in Type 2 Diabetes

Frequent exercise breaks during prolonged sitting may be better for blood vessel health in people with type 2 diabetes than less-frequent activity interruptions. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Stress Reduction Benefits of Exercise and Being Outdoors Following Election

New Brunswick, N.J. (Nov. 6, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Brandon L. Alderman is available for interviews on how being outdoors and exercise can reduce stress following the 2020 election and during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Time spent outdoors and…

Missing rehab due to COVID-19 increased distress in women with breast cancer

Beyond the tragic surges in hospitalizations and deaths, the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted healthcare for people with a wide range of medical conditions – including cancer. For women recovering after breast cancer treatment, COVID-19-related interruptions in rehabilitation care led to emotional distress and other effects on health and well-being, reports a study in the October issue of Rehabilitation Oncology, official journal of the APTA Oncology, an Academy of the American Physical Therapy Association. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

One-size-fits-all is no fit for heart health

From Weight Watchers to wearable tech – wherever we look, there are messages encouraging us to stay fit and healthy. But diets and training methods aside, when it comes to heart health, research from the University of South Australia shows that a far more personalised approach is needed…and it all starts with your genes.

Move More or Sit Less: How to Maintain a Healthy Brain

Worldwide, a person is diagnosed with dementia every three seconds. Regular physical activity and limited sedentary behavior (i.e., time spent sitting or lying down) are two important lifestyle strategies for maintaining good brain health. However, we do not know which…

Exercise During Pregnancy: A Prescription for Improved Maternal/Fetal Well-being

Evidence now supports the safety and health benefits of prenatal physical activity for pregnant women. Therefore, it is critical that women and exercise professionals shift their individual and collective perspective of prenatal physical activity away from the potential risks of…

Menopause May Affect Improvements in Exercise Fitness

All women go through menopause, usually between the ages of 46 and 54. Their periods stop, and they can no longer get pregnant. Postmenopausal women also have lower heart function. This study investigated whether menopause influences heart function and exercise…

Quantity and Context of Physical Activity: Important Factors in the Relationship with Pain

Many people are affected by painful conditions like low back pain, arthritis and cancer. Pain can be difficult to treat, with few safe and effective options. Some research suggests that being physically active can reduce the severity and impact of…

Hourly 4-s Cycle Sprints Prevent Inactivity-Induced Impairment of Fat Metabolism

It is well known that daily exercise has health benefits, and physical inactivity is unhealthy. Inactivity, typically characterized by daily sitting time, needs to be interrupted periodically with physical activity. However, the most effective amount and type of activity have…

Retirement Modifies Daily Physical Activity

Retirement changes daily routines. Time previously used for work and commuting is replaced by leisure time. In this study, more than 500 employees from Finland wore motion sensors before and after retirement. The results show that women’s physical activity decreased,…

ACSM Publishes Call to Action Addressing COVID-19 and Return to Sports and Physical Activity

ACSM published a call to action statement addressing COVID-19 and safely returning to sports and exercise. Authored by ACSM subject matter experts, the statement highlights the current science around COVID-19 and provides 12 action steps to consider. “COVID-19: Considerations for Sports and Physical Activity” is ACSM’s first call to action statement and published in the August issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports.

University of Miami Sports Medicine Institute expert leads call to action for harnessing exercise’s health benefits during the pandemic

To address and overcome the challenges so Americans can return to or sustain physical activity safely, Thomas M. Best, M.D., Ph.D., FACSM, professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and research director of the UHealth Sports Medicine Institute, and sports medicine colleagues from around the U.S. wrote “COVID-19: Considerations for Sports and Physical Activity,” published August 7 in Current Sports Medicine Reports, an American College of Sports Medicine journal.

National Farmers Market Week Kicks Off Sunday, and D.C. Ranks #1 in the U.S.

Aug. 2-8 marks National Farmers Market Week! D.C. ranks number one for farmers markets among the 100 largest U.S. cities according to the 2020 American Fitness Index rankings published by ACSM and the Anthem Foundation. More than 8,600 farmers markets currently operate across the U.S., stimulating the local economy and providing access to nourishing food.

Breaking Up Sitting Time: Should We All Stand Up, Sit Down or Keep Moving?

Sitting for prolonged periods can increase the risk of diabetes and other health problems. While physical activity recommendations suggest breaking up sitting time, it is not known if all individuals respond the same way. Therefore, investigators examined whether an individual’s…

Arlington, Va., Named ‘Fittest City’ in 2020 American Fitness Index Ranking of Top 100

ACSM and the Anthem Foundation release the 2020 American Fitness Index, ranking America’s 100 largest cities on health behaviors, chronic disease and community infrastructure indicators. Arlington, Va. earned the title of “America’s Fittest City.” Seattle, Wash.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Madison, Wis.; San Francisco, Calif.; Washington, D.C.; Irvine, Calif.; Denver, Colo.; Boise, Idaho; and Boston, Mass., round out the top 10 fittest cities.

Lack of physical activity during COVID-19 may fuel childhood obesity, new study finds

The childhood obesity rate in the United States may increase by 2.4% if school closures continue into December, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. Having schools closed nationwide, children in the U.S. have missed their opportunity to participate in physical education classes and other school-based physical activities, such as recess and after-school sports programs.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Physical Activity and Health During COVID-19 Crisis

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 18, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Brandon L. Alderman is available for interviews on how to stay active when gyms are closed and you’re confined to home during the COVID-19 crisis. Alderman can also discuss…