Epilepsy education in India: Teacher training project aims to address stigma, increase inclusion

Schools can be important for epilepsy screening, as well as awareness of seizure first aid and basic knowledge. In a rural area of Punjab, a three-year project of surveys and training activities aimed to increase knowledge and dispel myths and misconceptions.

Genetic Testing for Neonatal Epilepsy Allows Babies to Go Home Sooner

Genetic testing results in lower length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for infants with epilepsy, according to a study published in the journal Pediatric Neurology. The reduction in hospital stay time in babies with epilepsy who spent time in the NICU was not explained by changes in the severity of illness, birth weight or population changes in the NICU over time. These findings confirm the importance of early genetic testing for epilepsy, which allows more precise treatment and better seizure control during a critical time in brain development.

World Health Organization unanimously approves plan to improve epilepsy care, reduce stigma

On 27 May 2022, World Health Organization Member States unanimously approved the Intersectoral Global Action Plan on Epilepsy and other Neurological Disorders (IGAP) at the 75th World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Receives $11 Million Grant to Tackle Post-Traumatic Epilepsy

Approximately 1 in 50 people who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) will develop post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE)—with the risk of PTE significantly higher in people with severe TBI. PTE is characterized by recurring seizures that begin a week or more after the brain injury, and there is currently no way to identify those at risk for developing PTE or to prevent its onset.

Addressing status epilepticus management in low-resource regions: “Where do we fit in?”

Low-resource areas face multiple challenges to diagnosing and treating long-lasting seizures, or status epilepticus. We talked with neurologists in four countries about how status epilepticus is managed in their areas.

Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Not Linked to Epilepsy in Children

A new study suggests that antidepressant use by mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy does not increase the chances of epilepsy and seizures in babies. The research is published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Seizures in the Canadian Arctic: A public health crisis, hidden in plain sight

He set out to research the effect of polar day-night patterns on seizure frequency and epilepsy. He found something he never expected: a public health crisis in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, relevant to geographically isolated communities and Indigenous peoples.

Seizure forecasting with wrist-worn devices possible for people with epilepsy, study shows

Despite medications, surgery and neurostimulation devices, many people with epilepsy continue to have seizures. The unpredictable nature of seizures is severely limiting. If seizures could be reliably forecast, people with epilepsy could alter their activities, take a fast-acting medication or turn up their neurostimulator to prevent a seizure or minimize its effects.

A new study in Scientific Reports by Mayo Clinic researchers and international collaborators found patterns could be identified in patients who wear a special wristwatch monitoring device for six to 12 months, allowing about 30 minutes of warning before a seizure occurred. This worked well most of the time for five of six patients studied.

Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health Epileptologist Publishes Research Showing Nasal Spray Seizure Rescue Medication is Safe and Effective When Used with Oral Medication

Eric Segal, M.D., co-director of Epilepsy at Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital at Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health has published new research showing that diazepam nasal spray*, which uses a type of medication called a benzodiazepine, is safe and effective for…

Common anti-seizure medication associated with elevated fracture risk in kids with epilepsy

A study found that one of the two most commonly prescribed anti-seizure medications is associated with a higher risk of fracture for children and teens with epilepsy. This is significant for this population as it comes during a critical period of bone development, a time during which several features coalesce to develop bone strength that peaks in adulthood.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

– COVID-19 NEWS: Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Shows Vaccine Likely Protects People with HIV
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Documents Stroke Risk in Cardiac Assist Device
– CBD Products May Help People with Epilepsy Better Tolerate Anti-Seizure Medications

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100
– COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths
– COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
– Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

Neurosurgery team performs groundbreaking laser hemispherectomy on child with epilepsy

For only the second time in the world, doctors at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital and the Department of Neurosurgery used a minimally invasive surgery to disconnect the right and left sides of the brain, stopping the seizures for a boy with epilepsy.

Case Western Reserve researchers identify potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University have identified a potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures. Lin Mei, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosciences at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, who led the new study in mouse models, said the team found a new chemical reaction that could help control epileptic seizures.

Lurie Children’s Approved for $4 Million in Funding for Study on Comparative Effectiveness of Palliative Surgery Versus Additional Anti-Seizure Medications For Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Anne Berg, PhD, Research Professor, and Sandi Lam, MD, MBA, Chief of Neurosurgery at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago have been approved for a $4 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to conduct a study, Comparative effectiveness of palliative surgery versus additional anti-seizure medications for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome.

Researchers Provide Complete Clinical Landscape for Major Gene Linked to Epilepsy and Autism

Researchers have compiled a complete genetic and clinical analysis of more than 400 individuals with SCN2A-related disorder, which has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including epilepsy and autism. By linking clinical features to genetic abnormalities in a standardized format, the researchers hope their findings lead to improved identification and clinical intervention.

Do Epilepsy Medications Taken During Pregnancy Affect a Child’s Development?

Children born to women taking certain medications for epilepsy during pregnancy have no developmental delays at age three when compared to children of healthy women without epilepsy, according to a preliminary study released today, March 4, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021. Most of the women with epilepsy in the study took either lamotrigine or levetiracetam during their pregnancy, or a combination of the two.

Podcast – Persistent seizures: How to use the ketogenic diet for super-refractory status epilepticus

A recent paper in Neurology Clinical Practice offers practical considerations for using the ketogenic diet in patients with seizures that last more than 24 hours, a condition known as super-refractory status epilepticus. ILAE spoke with two of the authors – dietitian Neha Kaul and epileptologist Joshua Laing.

Podcast – Dieta cetogénica y estatus epiléptico súper refractario

Un artículo reciente en “Neurology Clinical Practice” ofrece consideraciones prácticas para el empleo de la dieta cetogénica en pacientes con estatus epiléptico superrefractario. La ILAE habló con dos de los autores del artículo. (Podcast en ingles; transcripcion en español.)