Epilepsy

Lurie Children’s Approved for $4 Million in Funding for Study on Comparative Effectiveness of Palliative Surgery Versus Additional Anti-Seizure Medications For Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Anne Berg, PhD, Research Professor, and Sandi Lam, MD, MBA, Chief of Neurosurgery at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago have been approved for a $4 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to conduct a study, Comparative effectiveness of palliative surgery versus additional anti-seizure medications for Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome.

Researchers Provide Complete Clinical Landscape for Major Gene Linked to Epilepsy and Autism

Researchers have compiled a complete genetic and clinical analysis of more than 400 individuals with SCN2A-related disorder, which has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including epilepsy and autism. By linking clinical features to genetic abnormalities in a standardized format, the researchers hope their findings lead to improved identification and clinical intervention.

Do Epilepsy Medications Taken During Pregnancy Affect a Child’s Development?

Children born to women taking certain medications for epilepsy during pregnancy have no developmental delays at age three when compared to children of healthy women without epilepsy, according to a preliminary study released today, March 4, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021. Most of the women with epilepsy in the study took either lamotrigine or levetiracetam during their pregnancy, or a combination of the two.

Two Steps Closer to Flexible, Powerful, Fast Bioelectronic Devices

Led by Biomedical Engineering Prof Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, with long-term stability in physiological environments such as the human body. In particular, they could facilitate diagnosis and monitoring of neurological disease.