Pregnancy, stress, sleep issues, physiology among women’s unique cardiovascular concerns

Women face many female-specific risks for heart disease and stroke, including pregnancy, physical and emotional stress, sleep patterns and many physiological factors, according to multiple studies highlighted in this year’s Go Red for Women® special issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, published online today.

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Study: COVID-19 infection rates high in pregnant women

The study also showed that the number of COVID-19 infections in pregnant patients from nearly all communities of color in Washington was high. There was a twofold to fourfold higher prevalence of pregnant patients with COVID-19 infections from communities of color than expected based on the race-ethnicity distribution of pregnant women in Washington in 2018.

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Exercise during Pregnancy Protects Kids’ Future Health from Parents’ Obesity

New research in mice suggests that exercising during pregnancy may help prevent children—especially boys—from developing health problems related to their parents’ obesity. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.

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Is it Safe to Get COVID-19 Vaccine while Pregnant?

Justin Brandt, an assistant professor in the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and director of quality and safety for the department of OB/GYN, talks about the information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and what pregnant women should consider when deciding whether to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

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History of Vaccines Offers Lessons on COVID-19 For Pregnant Women

DALLAS – Feb. 8, 2021 – Pregnant women, who are at increased risk of preterm birth or pregnancy loss if they develop a severe case of COVID-19, need the best possible guidance on whether they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, according to an article by two UT Southwestern obstetricians published today in JAMA. That guidance can take lessons from what is already known about other vaccines given during pregnancy.

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New clues on why pregnancy may increase risk of organ transplant rejection

A research study at the University of Chicago has found that in pregnancy, while the T cell response to a fetus becomes tolerant to allow for successful pregnancy, the part of the immune system that produces antibodies (known as the humoral response) becomes sensitized, creating memory B cells that can later contribute to the rejection of a transplanted organ.

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