The Application of Noninvasive Prenatal Screening Using Cell-free DNA in General Risk Pregnancies – The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics Publishes its Highly Anticipated Evidence-based Review

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) has released its second, highly anticipated systematic evidence-based review (SER): “The Application of Noninvasive Prenatal Screening Using Cell-free DNA in General Risk Pregnancies.”

Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Not Linked to Epilepsy in Children

A new study suggests that antidepressant use by mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy does not increase the chances of epilepsy and seizures in babies. The research is published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Experts Provide Hope and Treatment Options during Infertility Awareness Week

Infertility is a common problem affecting millions of Americans. The National Center of Health Statistics estimates 1 in 8 couples of reproductive age has problems conceiving. Infertility refers to the inability to produce a pregnancy after 12 months of unprotected…

Stress during Pregnancy May Lead to Heart Disease, Accelerated Aging in Next Generation

Prenatal stress can cause damage in the aorta in offspring, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and accelerate aging, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Pregnancy stretch marks cause stress and emotional burden, study finds

Stretch marks cause pregnant women and individuals substantial embarrassment that can negatively impact pregnancy and quality of life, a new study found. The lesions, and concerns for developing and permanency, may be contributing factors for depression or anxiety in the perinatal period, which affect up to one in seven women during pregnancy and postpartum. Researchers say this should bring new focus on stretch marks and identifying mental health disorders during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

Research Reveals Racial and Ethnic Disparities Persist in Pregnancy Outcomes of Patients with Lupus

While investigators have known that maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have improved over time, it is unknown whether the improved outcomes are shared equally among different racial and ethnic groups. Lupus has been shown to disproportionately affect minorities of childbearing age. A new study that includes researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented today at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting shows that pregnancy outcomes in women with lupus have improved in all racial and ethnic groups over the past decade, but disparities still exist.

E-cigarette Exposure during Pregnancy Changes Autophagy Signaling, Leads to Brain Defects in Rats

Article title: Fetal e-cigarette exposure programs a neonatal brain hypoxic-ischemic sensitive phenotype via altering DNA methylation patterns and autophagy signaling pathway Authors: Andrew Walayat, Yong Li, Yanyan Zhang, Yingjie Fu, Bailin Liu, Xuesi M. Shao, Lubo Zhang, Daliao Xiao From…

Metabolic Syndrome during Pregnancy Leads to Abnormal Development of Fat Tissue in Mouse Offspring

Article title: Accelerated developmental adipogenesis programs adipose tissue dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk in offspring born to dams with metabolic dysfunction Authors: Anna Mikolajczak, Nada A. Sallam, Radha D. Singh, Taylor B. Scheidl, Emma J. Walsh, Sebastian Larion, Carol Huang, Jennifer…

Renowned Physician-Scientist with Expertise in High-Risk Pregnancies Named System Chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science at Mount Sinai Health System

Joanne L. Stone, MD, a leading physician-scientist in women’s health with special expertise in fetal imaging and caring for high-risk pregnancies, has been named the Chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System. Dr. Stone currently serves as Director of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Fellowship program for the Mount Sinai Health System, Vice Chair for Diversity and Inclusion of the OB/GYN Department, and Immediate Past President of the Faculty Council.

The 5:2 diet – a good choice for gestational diabetes

Weight loss after gestational diabetes can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Yet finding the most effective way to lose weight and keep it off can be a challenge, especially for mothers with a new baby. Now, new research from the University of South Australia suggests that the popular 5:2 or intermittent fasting diet ¬is just as effective as a conventional energy-restricting diet, enabling women greater choice and flexibility when it comes to weight loss.

U of U Health leads national studies of “long COVID” in adults and during pregnancy

University of Utah Health scientists are on the leading edge of a pair of large studies investigating the long-term effects of COVID-19. The nationwide studies, supported by the National Institutes of Health, will attempt to answer key questions about the lingering effects of the viral disorder on pregnant individuals and their infants, as well as why some people develop post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC), including “long COVID,” and others don’t.

In pregnant women with COVID-19, sex of fetus may influence maternal and placental immune response and neonatal immune protection

In pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, male placentas demonstrated significantly higher levels of certain genes and proteins associated with increased immune activation compared with female placentas, according to a new study published in Science Translational Medicine.

Many Mothers May Have Delayed or Abandoned Plans for Additional Children Because of COVID-19 Pandemic

Nearly half of New York City mothers who had been trying to become pregnant again before the coronavirus pandemic began stopped in the first few months of the outbreak, a new study shows.

Do a Mom’s Medications Affect Her Breast Milk and Baby? New Center Investigates

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $6.1M to launch a new research center studying the effects of maternal antibiotic use on breast milk and infant health. The center is funded by National Institutes of Health, as part of their new Maternal and Pediatric Precision in Therapeutics (MPRINT) Hub.

Enzyme Could Be Major Driver of Preeclampsia

A new study by UT Southwestern scientists indicates that an enzyme called protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) appears to be a major driver of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by the development of high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. The finding, published in Circulation Research, could lead to new treatments for preeclampsia other than premature delivery, which is often the only option.

‘Leaky’ Heart Valves in Pregnant Women Need More Attention Than Once Thought, Study Suggests

An analysis of more than 20,000 individual medical records suggests that a form of heart valve disease thought to be relatively benign during pregnancy may put women at risk for serious bleeding, high blood pressure, organ damage and other complications during childbirth, according to research from Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Two UAlbany Studies Find Links Between Neighborhood Risk and Birth Outcomes, and Maternal Depression and Gestational Diabetes

Two new studies released by the University at Albany School of Public Health shed light on different factors impacting the health of mothers and newborns, with one study finding a link between neighborhood risk and birth outcomes, and a second indicating a relationship between maternal depression and gestational diabetes.

Maternal obesity during pregnancy linked to higher risk of colorectal cancer in adult offspring

Infants whose mothers were obese during pregnancy may have a heightened risk of developing colorectal cancer later in life, according to new research led by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Online, Video-Based Exercise Program Can Help with Postpartum Abdominal Bulge and Back Pain

A study at HSS finds that an online, video-based core exercise program can help with a condition many women experience after childbirth. Diastasis recti causes the abdominal bulge that often occurs after giving birth and may be associated with low back pain and urinary incontinence.

Teens who use cannabis frequently more likely to have premature baby, study suggests

Teenagers who use cannabis frequently may be more likely to have children born preterm, when they become parents up to twenty years later, finds a new University of Bristol-led study. The research, published in Scientific Reports, repeatedly assessed 665 participants in a general population cohort on their tobacco and cannabis use between ages 14 to 29 years, before pregnancy.

NIH award to tackle early infant morbidity due to increasing incidences of food allergies

A Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher has been awarded a $1.93 million, five-year grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to study the impact of maternal immunoglobulin D (IgD) transferred to the fetus during pregnancy and its impact on protecting against food allergies.

UIC researchers awarded $9.9M for Black midwives program

A new health care program developed by University of Illinois Chicago researchers and Melanated Group Midwifery Care, or MGMC, that aims to combat disparities that affect maternal and infant outcomes for Black pregnant people has received $9.9 million in funding. The five-year award was granted by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, or PCORI, an independent, nonprofit organization authorized by Congress in 2010 to fund research that will provide patients, their caregivers, and clinicians with evidence-based information needed to make better-informed health care decisions.

The CDC recommended that pregnant people be vaccinated against COVID-19. Learn more from BIDMC’s Dr. Ai-ris Collier, who has led research evaluating the immunogenicity of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines.

Ai-ris Collier, MD, a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is available for expert comment regarding the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendation that pregnant people be vaccinated against COVID-19. Dr. Collier has led research published…

Rat Model of Preeclampsia Gives new Insight into Immunological Changes during Pregnancy

Article title: Immunological comparison of pregnant Dahl salt-sensitive and Sprague-Dawley rats commonly used to model characteristics of preeclampsia Authors: Erin B. Taylor, Eric M. George, Michael J. Ryan, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “The current study…

Wisconsin bioethics project chronicles pregnancy, substance use disorder and the law

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is embarking on a massive research project to shed light on early child development, including the health and developmental implications of opioid use during pregnancy. The very first task is to ensure the study — the HEALthy Brain and Child Development study (HBCD) — is on solid legal and ethical ground.