Alumni-led Production of Rent Gives Current Students A Taste of Broadway

In the early 2000s, two eager University of Northern Colorado Theatre Arts majors had their eyes set on New York’s biggest stage. Taking dance course after dance course and performing in multiple student productions, Jason Veasey and Aléna Watters achieved that dream, using the skills they perfected on campus and eventually showcasing them on Broadway. Now the pair is back, sharing the knowledge they’ve learned with today’s students and taking leading roles behind the scenes in UNC’s production of the popular Broadway musical Rent, that opened on Oct. 21.

True Grit? Doesn’t Matter for Resistance Training in Men or Women

A study is the first to examine the relationship between grit and a muscular endurance performance task – specifically, the grueling back squat. The expectation was that a “gritty” person would perform more repetitions in a resistance training set. Interestingly, grit did not predict muscular endurance during the back squat in well-trained men and women. Both males and females independently failed to show a relationship between grit and repetitions performed.

Radiologist Characteristics Predict Performance in Screening Mammography

According to a new study, by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute and the American College of Radiology’s National Mammography Database Committee, the most influential radiologist characteristics impacting mammography interpretive performance were geography, breast sub-specialization, performance of diagnostic mammography, and performance of diagnostic ultrasound.

Lessons from Wuhan: What managers and employees need to know

As COVID-19 lockdowns and quarantines are lifted, businesses are now faced with the challenge of how to keep their employees who are returning to work motivated and engaged.

A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher shows that both employees and managers have an important part to play in promoting employee engagement during the pandemic.

Study Provides First Evidence of a Relationship between a Bird’s Gut and its Brain

A study of the relationships between cognition and the gut microbiome of captive zebra finches showed that their gut microbiome characteristics were related to performance on a cognitive assay where they learned a novel foraging technique. Researchers also identified potentially critical bacteria that were relatively more abundant in birds that performed better on this assay. This correlation provides some of the first evidence of a relationship between a bird’s gut microbiome and its brain.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

HRM practices a predictor for business resilience after layoffs

As retrenchments continue to cloud the foreseeable future of businesses worldwide, new research from the University of South Australia, the University of Melbourne and RMIT indicates that some businesses will fare better than others – and it’s all dependent on their type of human resource management system.