UCLA Research Finds that U.S. Sick Leave Policies Widen Racial Inequalities, Lag Nearly Every Other Country

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) released the first study to systematically analyze how common sick leave eligibility criteria in the U.S. affect access and to examine sick leave policies globally to understand whether these criteria are necessary. The research found marked racial and gender gaps in leave access in the U.S. due to restrictions targeting workers at small businesses, part-time workers, and workers at new jobs.

Scientists model ‘true prevalence’ of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

Scientists have developed a statistical framework that incorporates key COVID-19 data to model the true prevalence of this disease in the U.S. Their approach projects that in the U.S. as many as 60% of COVID-19 cases went undetected as of March 7, 2021.

During COVID-19, nurses face significant burnout risks, reports American Journal of Nursing

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 40 percent of nurses and other health care workers had risks associated with an increased likelihood of burnout, reports a survey study in the August issue of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

COVID-19 shapes future of accessibility services at WVU

WVU’s Office of Accessibility Services saw a 900% increase in requests from deaf or hard of hearing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Enlisting students on work study programs to do lecture transcriptions and closed captioning helped the University save nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

Novel Method Predicts if COVID-19 Clinical Trials Will Fail or Succeed

Researchers are the first to model COVID-19 completion versus cessation in clinical trials using machine learning algorithms and ensemble learning. They collected 4,441 COVID-19 trials from ClinicalTrials.gov to build a testbed with 693 dimensional features created to represent each clinical trial. These computational methods can predict whether a COVID-19 clinical trial will be completed or terminated, withdrawn or suspended. Stakeholders can leverage the predictions to plan resources, reduce costs, and minimize the time of the clinical study.

Early CHIS 2021 Data Estimates Show how Californians Dealt With COVID-19

With California state vaccination rates slowing, and guidelines on mask wearing and social gatherings changing, the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (CHPR) has released new data from the 2021 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) that sheds light on Californians’ views on getting the vaccine and following suggested safety protocols.

Strong immune response underlies acute kidney injury related to COVID-19

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that acute kidney injury associated with COVID-19 resembles sepsis-caused kidney injury, and the immune response triggered by the infection plays a pivotal role.

The findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction — a loss of function in cellular energy production — is commonly found in kidney injury related to COVID-19.

What if We Could Give Viruses a One-Two Punch?

Researchers at Stanford and Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have developed virus-killing molecules called peptoids. The technology could make possible an emerging category of antiviral drugs that could treat everything from herpes and COVID-19 to the common cold.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100
– COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths
– COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
– Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

Healing from Post-Pandemic Trauma: Moving Forward After Lockdown

Dreams about unmasked crowds. Getting back to the routines of work, school or the everyday things we used to do. Shaking hands and hugging. Meeting without a computer screen separating the people in the conversation. Mourning the loss of lives.  Anxiety about re-entering society as the world continues to grapple with the pandemic is real.

UT/TT Poll: Texans’ Views on Vaccines, Leadership, Legislation and the Future

The latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll showed significant differences along party lines on Texans’ attitudes about COVID-19 vaccines: 79% of Democrats report being vaccinated, compared with 47% of Republicans. And about a quarter of Texans (24%) say they are not planning on getting a vaccine.

Mount Sinai Leaders Discuss Equity, the Impact of the Pandemic on Healthcare, and the Unprecedented Era and Increasing Interest of Psychedelics on Treating Mental Health at the 2021 Aspen Ideas Health and Aspen Ideas Festival

Reflections on the pandemic, developing innovative solutions to address inequities in health and medicine, and the use of psychedelic drugs to help treat psychiatric disorders are among the topics presented at Aspen Ideas Health and the Aspen Ideas Festival from June 27-July 1, 2021, in Aspen, Colorado. Presented by the Aspen Institute and sponsored by the Mount Sinai Health System, the festival is a unique forum for the exchange of ideas.

UC San Diego Health Adopts SMART Health Card for Digital Vaccine Records

UC San Diego Health is now offering a verifiable digital vaccine record to its patients who have or will receive a COVID-19 vaccine. These secure online records, otherwise known as a SMART health card, can be accessed directly from the MyUCSDChart patient portal.

Institute of Human Virology Member Joins Scientific Advisory Committee of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations

The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) announced that Alash’le Abimiku, PhD, Professor of Medicine of the Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a Global Virus Network (GVN) Center of Excellence, will join their Scientific Advisory Committee for three-years.

Reopening Anxiety? Here’s How to Overcome it According to University of Kentucky Experts

For nearly a year, we relied on masks to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Now, many are removing the facial coverings, but that doesn’t mean it will be easy to shed the anxiety that accompanies a global pandemic. If you’re having difficulty coping with this added stress, psychology experts at the University of Kentucky say you’re not alone.

What Was Learning At Home Like For Under-Connected Families?

Internet access is up dramatically since 2015, but 18 percent of lower-income families had their service cut at least once during the pandemic due to cost, and 12 percent still have no computer at home at all, according to a report led by Rutgers and other researchers that highlights digital inequity after a year of learning at home.

UCI professor wins Spain’s prestigious Princess of Asturias award for scientific research

Irvine, Calif., June 24, 2021 — Philip Felgner, Ph.D., professor in residence of physiology & biophysics at the University of California, Irvine, is one of seven scholars worldwide to win Spain’s prestigious Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research in recognition of their contributions to designing COVID-19 vaccines.

New analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection increased 30 percent for households with a recent birthday in counties with high rates of COVID-19

Findings suggest informal social gatherings such as birthday parties played role in infection spread at the height of the coronavirus pandemic

No birthday-bash infection jumps seen in areas with low rates of COVID-19

Households with children’s birthdays had greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection than with adult birthdays

UCLA-led Research Finds Connections Between Air Quality and COVID Vulnerability

Even as governments across the United States consider lifting mask mandates and relaxing preventative measures as vaccination numbers creep up, new research from a UCLA-led team has found that such basic techniques significantly reduce the risk of getting COVID-19. In addition, the research found that U.S. counties with higher exposures to poor air quality, historically, saw higher county-level COVID-19 mortality rates in 2020.

SARS-CoV-2 Worldwide Replication Drives Rapid Rise and Selection of Mutations

The number of COVID-19 variants is growing rapidly, so much that the scale and scope of mutation may pose a threat to the continuing successful use of the current vaccines and therapies. The findings, by an international team that includes University of California researchers, are being published in the June edition of the peer-reviewed journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The pace of variation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus strains makes plain the threat that rapidly evolving new strains might give rise to escape variants, capable of limiting the efficacy of vaccines, therapies, and diagnostic tests.

COVID-19 Creates Hearing, Balance Disorders, Aggravates Tinnitus Symptoms

Evidence suggests auditory and vestibular effects should be added to the growing list of physiological impacts of COVID-19. During the 180th Meeting, Colleen Le Prell from the University of Texas at Dallas will talk about hearing and balance disorders associated with coronavirus infection and how pandemic-related stress and anxiety may aggravate tinnitus symptoms. Her presentation, “Hearing disorders secondary to infection with SARS-CoV-2,” will take place Thursday, June 10.

Normal Breathing Sends Saliva Droplets 7 Feet; Masks Shorten This

The WHO and the CDC recommend keeping a certain distance between people to prevent the spread of COVID-19. These social distancing recommendations are estimated from a variety of studies, but further research about the precise mechanism of virus transport is still needed. In Physics of Fluids, researchers demonstrate normal breathing indoors without a mask can transport saliva droplets capable of carrying virus particles to a distance of 2.2 meters in a matter of 90 seconds.

Pandemic Quarantine Acoustically Contributes to Mental, Physical Health Degradation

The prolonged impact of the COVID-19 pandemic created widespread lockdown fatigue and increased social tension in multiunit housing, but small improvements in quality-of-life routines may help people cope. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Braxton Boren from American University will discuss noise prevention techniques and the use of alterative acoustic stimulation to help those who find themselves in pandemic-related lockdowns. The session, “The Soundscape of Quarantine,” will take place Wednesday, June 9.

Noisy Homes During Pandemic Drive Future Design Choices

Due to strict lockdowns, many of us have seen and heard our family and neighbors much more than ever before. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Ayca Sentop Dümen and Konca Saher from the Turkish Acoustical Society will discuss the effects of pandemic-related noise on people’s satisfaction with their homes and how this may inform future design choices. Their presentation, “Noise annoyance in dwellings during the first wave of Covid-19,” will take place Tuesday, June 8.

Pandemic Teaching Transitions Back to Classroom with Lessons Learned

The COVID-19 pandemic created numerous changes and challenges for many people. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Andrew Morrison from Joliet Junior College will reveal lessons learned by educators during remote teaching caused by the pandemic and what techniques they can use in the return to classroom instruction. The session, “Lessons learned teaching through a pandemic and looking forward to a post-COVID-19 classroom,” will take place Tuesday, June 8.

Balancing Speech Intelligibility, Face Covering Effectiveness in Classrooms During the Pandemic

A better understanding of the impacts of face masks and shields on acoustic transmission in classrooms could help optimize educational settings. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Laura and Rich Ruhala from Kennesaw State University will talk about how various types of face coverings may affect students’ understanding of their teacher. Their presentation, “Acoustical transmission of face coverings used to reduce coronavirus transmission in a classroom environment,” will take place Tuesday, June 8.

How Kids Eat: Five New Insights on Daily Habits and Childhood Obesity

What we eat during childhood can affect the health of individuals—and populations—for years to come. As rates of childhood obesity continue to rise, five studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into the diets of children and teens around the world.

How a Global Pandemic Changed the Way We Eat and Shop

Studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into how people ate, shopped and felt about food as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded. Studying these trends can shed light on potential lingering health impacts of the pandemic and inform responses to future emergencies.

Dip your toe – or dive right in: WVU psychologists spill advice on reentering the world post-COVID

A high percentage of the population may experience “re-entry anxiety” as more people get vaccinated, guidelines are loosened and the masks come off, according to WVU psychologists.