Rutgers Toxicologist Available to Discuss Dangers of Taking Iodine to Treat COVID-19

Professor Lewis Nelson, M.D., is available to discuss the dangers of gargling, snorting, or ingesting Betadine, an iodine-based antiseptic to treat COVID-19. “Although many topical disinfectants such as povidone-iodine, which, is also known as Betadine, generally destroy viruses on direct…

Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Researchers found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.

FIELDING FOCUS | Covid-19 Conversation: Navigating Variants, Vaccines & Boosters

In this session, panelists Dr. Robert Kim-Farley (professor, departments of Epidemiology & Community Health Sciences) and Dr. Anne Rimoin (professor, Department of Epidemiology & director, Center for Global and Immigrant Health) will discuss the latest news on the pandemic in a conversation moderated by Dr. Ron Brookmeyer, dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health & distinguished professor, Department of Biostatistics.

Optical Techniques Offer Fast, Efficient COVID-19 Detection

Without the prospect of herd immunity on the immediate horizon, speedy detection for COVID-19 remains imperative for helping to curb the pandemic. Point-of-care testing that can provide immediate results is an urgent need. Researchers investigated the opportunities and challenges in developing rapid COVID-19 sensing techniques and discuss the prospects of optical biosensors for point-of-care COVID-19 testing in the journal Applied Physics Reviews.

Nanofiber Face Masks Improve Filtration Efficiency, Need Replacing More Often

Innovations to improve mask efficacy, with increasing focus on nanofiber manufacturing, have resulted in higher filtration efficiency, greater comfort, and easier breathing capacity. However, the effects of microwater droplets on the integrity of nanofibers are relatively unclear. In Physics of Fluids, researchers examine these ambiguities through a visualization of nanofibers interacting with water aerosol exposure. They used high-speed microscopic videos to systematically visualize the evolution of nanofibers with different contact angles, diameters, and mesh sizes under water aerosol exposure.

COVID 19: Learning About Nurses’ Moral Distress During Crisis Care

During the pandemic, nurses continue to deliver a crisis standard of care, which requires allocating and using scarce medical resources. This care, in the context of COVID-19, an infectious and potentially fatal illness, requires nurses to balance their duty to care for patients while protecting themselves and their families. Crisis standards of care cause high moral distress for clinicians. The lack of preparedness of U.S. hospitals to initiate crisis care standards is likely amplifying such distress. Could better leadership communication mitigate this distress and consequential poorer mental health?

Second Breath: Region’s First Double Lung Transplant for COVID-19 Patient

After more than 50 days on advanced life support, a multi-disciplinary team at UC San Diego Health helps a patient who contracted COVID-19 become a candidate for a successful double lung transplant. The transplant surgery was the first in the region performed on a COVID-19 patient.

What you need to know about the delta variant

For more than 40 years, UCI infectious disease researcher Michael Buchmeier has studied coronaviruses, and he’s one of the leading experts on SARS-CoV-2, the version of the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. As a more lethal mutation of the virus, called the delta variant, sparks another wave of cases, he offers his expertise about this threat.

Mount Sinai Researchers Report Troubling Increase in Homebound Older Adults, Especially Blacks and Hispanics, During Pandemic

In a study to be published this coming Monday, August 23, at 11 am Eastern (please note embargo) in JAMA Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai researchers discuss a troubling rise in homebound older adults that underlines the inequality of the pandemic.

Genomic Surveillance Crucial to Mitigate and Contain COVID-19

Researchers say that genomic surveillance to mitigate and contain COVID-19 is equally crucial to detect variants that are phenotypically or antigenically different well before they spread throughout the U.S. and the rest of the world. Genomic surveillance leverages applications of next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic methods to facilitate greater early anticipation as well as initiation of effective strategies to mitigate and contain outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 variants and other novel viruses.

Vaccine Hesitancy and Pregnancy: @UCSDHealth expert on why you should get the COVID-19 shot

With recent statewide vaccination mandates, members of the public may have questions or concerns about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination, especially in pregnant mothers. Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, MD, professor and chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UC…

Novel Model Predicts COVID-19 Outbreak Two Weeks Ahead of Time

People’s social behavior, reflected in their mobility data, is providing scientists with a way to forecast the spread of COVID-19 nationwide at the county level. Researchers have developed the first data-driven deep learning model with the potential to predict an outbreak in COVID-19 cases two weeks in advance. Feeding the mobility data to epidemiological forecasting models helps to estimate COVID-19 growth as well as evaluating the effects of government policies such as mandating masks on the spread of COVID-19.

LEDs Light the Way to Coronavirus Disinfection

LEDs are commonly used for sterilization, and in the continued effort to combat the coronavirus pandemic, LEDs can also help inactivate SARS-CoV-2. A team in Pakistan designed far-ultraviolet LEDs at a targeted wavelength of 222 nanometers, chosen both for its ability to inactivate the virus and for being safe on human skin. They based their design on the material aluminum gallium nitride, part of a set of materials called III-nitrides which are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly.

The Future of Masking Post-Vaccination

The COVID-19 vaccine is your best defense against the virus, but when and where should you continue to wear a mask? Rush infectious disease expert Michael Lin, MD, answers questions about wearing a mask post-vaccination.

New study details enzyme that allows coronavirus to resist antiviral medications

A new Iowa State University study details the structure of a critical enzyme present in SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. This enzyme removes nucleoside antiviral medications from the virus’s RNA, rendering many treatments ineffective. Scientists could use data uncovered in the new study to find ways to inhibit the enzyme, possibly leading to more effective treatments.

UCLA Research Finds that U.S. Sick Leave Policies Widen Racial Inequalities, Lag Nearly Every Other Country

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) released the first study to systematically analyze how common sick leave eligibility criteria in the U.S. affect access and to examine sick leave policies globally to understand whether these criteria are necessary. The research found marked racial and gender gaps in leave access in the U.S. due to restrictions targeting workers at small businesses, part-time workers, and workers at new jobs.

Scientists model ‘true prevalence’ of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

Scientists have developed a statistical framework that incorporates key COVID-19 data to model the true prevalence of this disease in the U.S. Their approach projects that in the U.S. as many as 60% of COVID-19 cases went undetected as of March 7, 2021.

During COVID-19, nurses face significant burnout risks, reports American Journal of Nursing

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 40 percent of nurses and other health care workers had risks associated with an increased likelihood of burnout, reports a survey study in the August issue of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

COVID-19 shapes future of accessibility services at WVU

WVU’s Office of Accessibility Services saw a 900% increase in requests from deaf or hard of hearing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Enlisting students on work study programs to do lecture transcriptions and closed captioning helped the University save nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

Novel Method Predicts if COVID-19 Clinical Trials Will Fail or Succeed

Researchers are the first to model COVID-19 completion versus cessation in clinical trials using machine learning algorithms and ensemble learning. They collected 4,441 COVID-19 trials from ClinicalTrials.gov to build a testbed with 693 dimensional features created to represent each clinical trial. These computational methods can predict whether a COVID-19 clinical trial will be completed or terminated, withdrawn or suspended. Stakeholders can leverage the predictions to plan resources, reduce costs, and minimize the time of the clinical study.

Early CHIS 2021 Data Estimates Show how Californians Dealt With COVID-19

With California state vaccination rates slowing, and guidelines on mask wearing and social gatherings changing, the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (CHPR) has released new data from the 2021 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) that sheds light on Californians’ views on getting the vaccine and following suggested safety protocols.

Strong immune response underlies acute kidney injury related to COVID-19

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that acute kidney injury associated with COVID-19 resembles sepsis-caused kidney injury, and the immune response triggered by the infection plays a pivotal role.

The findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction — a loss of function in cellular energy production — is commonly found in kidney injury related to COVID-19.

What if We Could Give Viruses a One-Two Punch?

Researchers at Stanford and Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have developed virus-killing molecules called peptoids. The technology could make possible an emerging category of antiviral drugs that could treat everything from herpes and COVID-19 to the common cold.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100
– COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths
– COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
– Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

Healing from Post-Pandemic Trauma: Moving Forward After Lockdown

Dreams about unmasked crowds. Getting back to the routines of work, school or the everyday things we used to do. Shaking hands and hugging. Meeting without a computer screen separating the people in the conversation. Mourning the loss of lives.  Anxiety about re-entering society as the world continues to grapple with the pandemic is real.

UT/TT Poll: Texans’ Views on Vaccines, Leadership, Legislation and the Future

The latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll showed significant differences along party lines on Texans’ attitudes about COVID-19 vaccines: 79% of Democrats report being vaccinated, compared with 47% of Republicans. And about a quarter of Texans (24%) say they are not planning on getting a vaccine.

Mount Sinai Leaders Discuss Equity, the Impact of the Pandemic on Healthcare, and the Unprecedented Era and Increasing Interest of Psychedelics on Treating Mental Health at the 2021 Aspen Ideas Health and Aspen Ideas Festival

Reflections on the pandemic, developing innovative solutions to address inequities in health and medicine, and the use of psychedelic drugs to help treat psychiatric disorders are among the topics presented at Aspen Ideas Health and the Aspen Ideas Festival from June 27-July 1, 2021, in Aspen, Colorado. Presented by the Aspen Institute and sponsored by the Mount Sinai Health System, the festival is a unique forum for the exchange of ideas.