AI-guided screening uses ECG data to detect a hidden risk factor for stroke

An AI-guided targeted screening strategy is effective in detecting new cases of atrial fibrillation that would not have come to attention in routine clinical care.
This strategy could reduce the number of undiagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation, and prevent stroke and death in millions of patients across the globe.

Mount Sinai Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence to Uncover the Cellular Origins of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Cognitive Disorders

Deep learning models represent “an entirely new paradigm for studying dementia”

Department of Energy Announces $15 Million in Exploratory Research for Extreme-Scale Science

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $15 million in funding for basic research to explore potentially high-impact approaches in scientific computing and extreme-scale science. The projects will address disruptive technology changes from emerging trends in high-end computing, massive datasets, artificial intelligence, and increasingly heterogeneous architectures such as neuromorphic and quantum computing systems.

New method for comparing neural networks exposes how artificial intelligence works

A team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a novel approach for comparing neural networks that looks within the “black box” of artificial intelligence to help researchers understand neural network behavior. Neural networks recognize patterns in datasets; they are used everywhere in society, in applications such as virtual assistants, facial recognition systems and self-driving cars.

Call for Papers – The International Halal Science and Technology Conference 2022 (IHSATEC): 15th Halal Science Industry and Business (HAISB)

The Halal Science Center, Chulalongkorn University, and Research Synergy Foundation, invites all to attend “The International Halal Science and Technology Conference 2022 (IHSATEC): 15th Halal Science Industry and Business (HAISB)” and has opened up a call for papers. The conference sessions will be on December 15-16, 2022 at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

The Effects of Copper, Patient-Relevant Tissue Models, and Artificial Intelligence Featured in Sept. 2022 Issue of ToxSci

A new ToxPoint articles argues that “Copper Is the New Showstopper,” while a commentary calls for patient-relevant tissue models in the September 2022 issue of Toxicological Sciences (ToxSci), the official journal of the Society of Toxicology (SOT). Other featured articles…

Rensselaer To Advance Blockchain Tech With $360k Grant

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Oshani Seneviratne, director of health data research at the Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA), and Lirong Xia, associate professor of computer science, have been awarded $363,343 from the Algorand Foundation. The award is part of an $8 million grant to fund blockchain research through a project led by Vassilis Zikas, associate professor of computer science and security researcher at Purdue University.

Mayo Clinic study shows successful labor outcomes in expectant mothers using AI

Mayo Clinic researchers have found that using artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to analyze patterns of changes in women who are in labor can help identify whether a successful vaginal delivery will occur with good outcomes for mom and baby. The findings were published in PLOS ONE.

Driving simulations that look more life-like

Today’s driving simulators have a big problem: They don’t look realistic enough, particularly background objects, such as trees, and road markings. But researchers have developed a new way to create photorealistic images for simulators, paving the way for better testing of driverless cars.Conventional computer graphics use detailed models, meshes and textures to render 2D images from 3D scenes, a labor-intensive process which produces images that often fall short of being realistic, particularly in the background.

A new neuromorphic chip for AI on the edge, at a small fraction of the energy and size of today’s compute platforms

An international team of researchers has designed and built a chip that runs computations directly in memory and can run a wide variety of AI applications–all at a fraction of the energy consumed by computing platforms for general-purpose AI computing. The NeuRRAM neuromorphic chip brings AI a step closer to running on a broad range of edge devices, disconnected from the cloud, where they can perform sophisticated cognitive tasks anywhere and anytime without relying on a network connection to a centralized server.

Precision health perspectives

In February, UCI launched the Institute for Precision Health, a campus-wide, interdisciplinary endeavor that merges UCI’s powerhouse health sciences, engineering, machine learning, artificial intelligence, clinical genomics and data science capabilities. The objective is to identify, create and deliver the most effective health and wellness strategy for each individual person and, in doing so, confront the linked challenges of health equity and the high cost of care.

Rensselaer Researchers to Address Big Data Challenges

Dr. Yangyang Xu, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has received a $250,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to research challenges associated with distributed big data in machine learning.Machine learning algorithms allow computers to make decisions, predictions, and recommendations on the basis of input training data without being explicitly told what information to look for in the data.

Mayo Clinic Platform_Accelerate announces second cohort of AI startups

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic Platform_Accelerate has announced its second cohort of health tech startups, including national and international businesses. The program will help seven companies develop and validate their artificial intelligence-driven health care products or solutions and advance their business plans.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Announces Biomedical Laureates to Address Health Disparities in Environmental Health, Cancer, and Emergency Medicine

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today the appointment of three new Laureates as part of its Biomedical Laureates Program, furthering its institutional commitment to broadening diversity and mentorship opportunities.

UCLA researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths

Fast data processing of overdose deaths, which have increased in recent years, is crucial to developing a rapid public health response. But the system now in place lacks precision and takes months. To correct that, UCLA researchers have developed an automated process that reduces data collection to a few weeks.

Pairing imaging, AI may improve colon cancer screening, diagnosis

A research team from the lab of Quing Zhu, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering  in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and machine learning to develop a colorectal cancer imaging tool that may one day improve the traditional endoscopy currently used by doctors.

JMIR Biomedical Engineering | Using Machine Learning to Reduce Treatment Burden

JMIR Publications recently published “Reducing Treatment Burden Among People With Chronic Conditions Using Machine Learning: Viewpoint” in JMIR Biomedical Engineering which reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated multiple challenges within the health care system and is unique to those living with chronic conditions.

Innovative Smartphone and Artificial Intelligence-Based Tests Featured at the 2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting

Scientists have developed a cheap, convenient smartphone test for monitoring patients at risk for dangerous blood clots. Research demonstrating that this test works, along with a second study on using artificial intelligence (AI) to improve testing and treatment for people with kidney stones, will be presented at the 2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo. Both studies could help resolve longstanding challenges in healthcare and laboratory testing.

Black Patients Found Six Times More Likely to Have Advanced Vision Loss After Glaucoma Diagnosis Than White Patients

Black patients have a dramatically higher risk of advanced vision loss after a new diagnosis of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) when compared to white patients, according to a new study from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE).

Artificial Intelligence in Personalized Medicine, Genomic Sequencing Advances, Human Brain Organogenesis, Building Trust with Patients, Guiding Patient Decisions with Mass Spectrometry, and Much More to Be Explored at 2022 AACC

At the 2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, laboratory medicine experts will present the cutting-edge research and technology that is revolutionizing clinical testing and patient care.

Life Gets Easier with ReadMe Program that Digitizes Documents and Images Developed Right Here in Thailand

A team from Chula’s Faculty of Engineering have made use of AI Deep Tech to develop a program that scans documents and images into OCR documents. The program is more than 90% accurate when reading Thai scripts and Chula’s UTC is now ready for a spin-off to the market through Eikonnex AI Co. Ltd.

University of Florida launches innovative online courses on AI in medicine

The University of Florida’s College of Medicine is launching an innovative series of interactive online courses to teach medical students and clinicians how artificial intelligence can improve medicine. The three courses are virtual and interactive, making extensive use of animations and videos. The courses were initially conceived for medical students but Tighe envisions them eventually also being used by medical residents and fellows, faculty and other practicing physicians.

Smartphone App to Assess Stool Form, Rural-Urban Disparities in Cirrhosis Mortality, Lung Infection Risk in Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis in July Issue of AJG

The July issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology highlights new clinical science including using a smartphone app to assess stool form, rural-urban disparities in cirrhosis mortality, and lung infection risk in severe alcohol-related hepatitis. This issue also includes articles on pediatric IBD, therapy options for Crohn’s disease, a novel endoscopic suturing device, proton pump inhibitors, and more.

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research Expands Partnership with The Johns Hopkins University to Accelerate Groundbreaking Immunotherapy Research

The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (BKI) announced today a new $10 million commitment at The Johns Hopkins University to fund novel work and advance immunotherapy research to provide lifesaving breakthroughs to people with cancer.

Flawed AI Makes Robots Racist, Sexist

The work, led by Johns Hopkins University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Washington researchers, is believed to be the first to show that robots loaded with an accepted and widely used model operate with significant gender and racial biases. The work is set to be presented and published this week at the 2022 Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency.

Computer hardware mimics brain functions

A multi-institutional team, including Argonne National Laboratory, has developed a material with which computer chips can be designed to reconfigure their circuits when presented with new information. It does so by mimicking functions in the human brain.

Developing Intelligent Digital Libraries: International Experience – Proposed Solutions for Vietnam

Ton Duc Thong University and the Office of Academic Resources, Chulalongkorn University, would like to invite you to join the free international conference on “Developing Intelligent Digital Libraries: International Experience – Proposed Solutions for Vietnam“, which will be held on July 15, 2022.

AI can be used to identify benign thyroid nodules and reduce unnecessary biopsies

Artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to identify thyroid nodules seen on thyroid ultrasound that are very unlikely to be cancerous, reducing a large number of unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study being presented Saturday at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.