Nanotech scientists create world’s smallest origami bird

Cornell University researchers have created micron-sized shape memory actuators that enable atomically thin two-dimensional materials to fold themselves into 3D configurations. All they require is a quick jolt of voltage. And once the material is bent, it holds its shape – even after the voltage is removed.

Leveraging Modeling and Simulation in Medicine at VisualizeMED

ASME’s VisualizeMED: Modeling and Simulation in Medicine will take place on April 14-15, 2021. This two-day virtual event is enabling the transformation of modeling and simulation in medicine by bringing together industry experts of technology and masters of technique who are effectively implementing it with the goal to increase the application and adoption on a global scale.

Biotechnology research and policy expert joins Thunderbird School of Global Management and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU through World Economic Forum fellowship

Thunderbird School of Global Management announces the first of two prestigious Hoffmann Fellowships appointed in collaboration with the World Economic Forum for post-doctoral research and policy innovation at the intersection of society, science and technology.

This Anti-COVID Mask Breaks the Mold

To address PPE shortages during the pandemic, scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley are developing a rechargeable, reusable, anti-COVID N95 mask and a 3D-printable silicon-cast mask mold.

New U.S. Strategy Unveiled for a Smart Competition with China in Science and Tech

The United States’ global leadership on science technology faces formidable competition from the People’s Republic of China; however the U.S. can take actions to maintain its competitive edge while enhancing innovation and protecting national security, according to a new report from the University of California San Diego.

Jennifer Doudna Wins 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, a professor at UC Berkeley and faculty scientist at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), is co-winner of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “the development of a method for genome editing.”

Recursion and University of Utah launch region’s largest life science incubator

Altitude Lab announced its first resident companies and opened applications for its breakthrough collaborative facility and program. It’s the first of its kind—a blended incubator/accelerator program focused on developing diverse and inclusive early-stage life science and health care companies in Utah.

UCLA Health’s Dr. Clara Lajonchere elected Chair of the California Precision Medicine Advisory Council

Dr. Clara Lajonchere, deputy director of the Institute for Precision Health at UCLA Health, has been elected chair of the new California Precision Medicine Advisory Council.

Tiny sensors fit 30,000 to a penny, transmit data from living tissue

Cornell University researchers who build nanoscale electronics have developed microsensors so tiny, they can fit 30,000 on one side of a penny. They are equipped with an integrated circuit, solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that enable them to harness light for power and communication. And because they are mass fabricated, with up to 1 million sitting on an 8-inch wafer, each device costs a fraction of that same penny.

Foxglove plants produce heart medicine. Can science do it better?

Biologist Zhen Wang’s team recently published a pair of papers detailing characteristics of cardiac glycosides in two foxglove species. “This kind of study is important because we first have to know the accurate structure of natural compounds before we can explore their medicinal effects,” she says.

Robot Uses Artificial Intelligence and Imaging to Draw Blood

Rutgers engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs. Their research results, published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, suggest that autonomous systems like the image-guided robotic device could outperform people on some complex medical tasks.

The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc. Renews Partnerships with Takeda and Bridge Medicines, LLC

To date, work done within the Tri-I TDI has resulted in the launch of two New York City–based companies and the licensing of six therapeutic discovery programs.

Scientists hit pay dirt with new microbial research technique

A better method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientists understand large-scale environmental cycles Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans “know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the…