Study Shows Hydroxychloroquine’s Harmful Effects on Heart Rhythm

The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which has been promoted as a potential treatment for Covid-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. Now, a team of researchers has used an optical mapping system to observe exactly how the drug creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat.

Read more

Study finds overwhelming support for smoke-free policies among Los Angeles tenants, landlords

Half of apartment dwellers in Los Angeles report having been exposed to unwanted secondhand smoke in their homes in the last year, and 9 in 10 of them say they favor policies banning smoking from their buildings, a new study by researchers at the Fielding School of Public Health’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research reveals.

Read more

Theoretical breakthrough shows quantum fluids rotate by corkscrew mechanism

Scientists performed simulations of merging rotating superfluids, revealing a peculiar corkscrew-shaped mechanism that drives the fluids into rotation without the need for viscosity.

Read more

UTEP Study Examines COVID-19 Stress, Coping Strategies, and Well-Being

Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling at The University of Texas at El Paso, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities.

Read more

Study Shows Promise for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Require New Treatment Options

A new type of immunotherapy treatment for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is being tested by Missak Haigentz, Jr., MD, medical director of hematology and oncology for Atlantic Health System. Early results appear promising in this phase 1/2 clinical trial of ADXS-503 being developed by Advaxis, Inc., a new type of cancer therapy which targets “hotspot” mutations that commonly occur in specific cancer types, both by itself and in combination with immunotherapy Keytruda® (pembrolizumab), which is commonly used to treat this type of lung cancer. Dr. Haigentz and colleagues published early results of this study in conjunction with ASCO 2020, the world’s premier scientific meeting for clinical research in oncology.

Read more

People more likely to accept nudges if they know how they work and how effective they are

The more people know about when and why behavioural interventions are being used and their effectiveness, the more likely they are to accept their use to change their behaviour, according to recent research from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Oxford.

Read more

Decisions to Stray From Clinical Oncology Pathways Are Often Justified, Roswell Park Analysis Shows

Clinical oncology pathways are an important tool, helping cancer care providers and their patients to zero in on the most appropriate care plan. But a treating professional’s decision to depart from the recommendations of these decision-support resources may be well-founded and in the patient’s best interests, a new Roswell Park study shows.

Read more

Remarkable Grads from the Class of 2020

This spring, the California State University​ will award degrees to more than 100,000 students who come from all walks of life. These students embody some of the characteristics that make the CSU’s student body so remarkable: resiliency, integrity and an eagerness to use their education to lift up those who come after them.

Read more

Targeted Drugs and Immunotherapies May Lower Risk of Therapy-Related Hematologic Cancers

While breakthrough treatments have emerged for several cancers over the last two decades, driving striking improvements in survival and other clinical outcomes, too little is known about the risk of therapy-related hematologic cancers following targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. In a study to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2020 virtual meeting, a Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center team reports that in many cases, these newer treatment approaches may reduce the risk of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia (tMDS/AML) compared to chemotherapy-based treatment strategies.

Read more

Electronic Health Records Fail to Detect Up to 33% of Medication Errors

Despite improvements in their performance over the past decade, electronic health records (EHRs) commonly used in hospitals nationwide fail to detect up to one in three potentially harmful drug interactions and other medication errors, according to scientists at University of Utah Health, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Read more

Study reveals factors influencing outcomes in advanced kidney cancer treated with immunotherapy

By analyzing tumors from patients treated with immunotherapy for advanced kidney cancer in three clinical trials, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have identified several features of the tumors that influence their response to immune checkpoint inhibitor drugs.

Read more

Researchers examine data to identify optimal vasopressor treatment for rare type of stroke

Results of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) study assessing the most commonly used medications for raising blood pressure in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a rare type of stroke, have been published in Neurosurgical Focus by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Read more

UW launches online training for contact tracing to help fight COVID-19

To provide training for the expanding workforce of contact tracers, the University of Washington’s Northwest Center for Public Health Practice created the free, online course Every Contact Counts to support public health agencies — including smaller, rural public health districts and tribal health departments — to help their existing and growing workforce in the art and science of conducting a contact-tracing interview.

Read more

Targeted therapy tepotinib for non-small cell lung cancer with MET exon 14 skipping mutation shows durable response

Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the MET exon 14 (METex14) skipping mutation had a 46.5% objective response rate to the targeted therapy drug tepotinib, as shown in a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (Abstract 9556 – Poster 322) by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Read more

Adoptive T-cell therapy ADP-A2M4 targeting MAGE-A4 shows early activity in patients with advanced solid tumors

The adoptive T-cell therapy ADP-A2M4, which is engineered to express a T-cell receptor (TCR) directed against the MAGE-A4 cancer antigen, achieved responses in patients with multiple solid tumor types, including synovial sarcoma, head and neck cancer and lung cancer, according to results from a Phase I clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Read more

COVID-19 Healthcare Coalition Launches COVID-19 Decision Support Dashboard

The new COVID-19 Decision Support Dashboard synthesizes large amounts of complex, essential data into easy-to-use key findings for public and private-sector leaders navigating the “reopening” of communities and businesses.

Read more

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Demonstrate Better Outcomes, Lower Cost in First-Ever Oncology Hospital-at-Home Evaluation

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) presented the first outcomes evaluation of an adult oncology hospital-at-home program today at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting. The study evaluated patients participating in HCI’s Huntsman at Home. The data demonstrate strong evidence for this care model, showing improved patient outcomes, including reduced hospitalizations and decreased visits to the emergency department.

Read more

Kennesaw State University’s Charles Parrott Selected as a 2020 CUR­–Arts and Humanities Faculty Mentor Awardee

Charles Parrott, associate professor in the Department of Theater & Performance Studies at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, GA, has been selected as a 2020 Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR)–Arts and Humanities Faculty Mentor Awardee.

Read more

Study Shows Clinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Results of a Phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Yale Cancer Center have shown that ARV-110, an androgen receptor PROTAC® protein degrader, demonstrates anti-tumor responses in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Read more