DMIND Application for Screening Depression – An AI Innovation from CU Faculties of Medicine and Engineering Researchers

Introducing a new dimension for consultations with those suffering from depression by the Department of Mental Health and the DMIND AI Innovation from Chula’s Faculties of Medicine and Engineering that provides screening for depression through the Mor Prom Application with greater accuracy, accessibility, and convenience thus reducing the burdens on medical practitioners and psychologists in taking care of patients with depression.

DeepGI AI – A Thai Innovation for the Precision in Colorectal Polyp Detection

Chula Engineering and Chula Medicine co-invent an innovative device for a rapid gastrointestinal cancer detection that yields accurate results hoping to foster preventive medicine in gastrointestinal malignancy and reduce the number of cancer patients.

Something in the Air: Embedded Gas Sensing Device Promises Simple, Accurate Volatile Organic Compounds Detection

Emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids, volatile organic compounds include a variety of chemicals, and many are associated with adverse health effects so detecting VOCs simply, quickly, and reliably is valuable for several practical applications. In Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers describe a device designed to analyze air samples containing various VOCs. The device inhales a sample, enabling the sensors within its aluminum gas chamber to analyze and respond in real situations.

Hopkins-Led Research Team Takes Gene Mutation Detection in Blood to the Next Level

Next-generation gene sequencing (NGS) technologies —in which millions of DNA molecules are simultaneously but individually analyzed— theoretically provides researchers and clinicians the ability to noninvasively identify mutations in the blood stream. Identifying such mutations enables earlier diagnosis of cancer and can inform treatment decisions. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a new technology to overcome the inefficiencies and high error rates common among next-generation sequencing techniques that have previously limited their clinical application.

Detecting Small Amounts of Virus in Early Infections

Diagnostic devices that are used at home or in doctors’ offices are often not sensitive enough to detect small amounts of a virus that might be present in samples from asymptomatic patients, which can occur in early stage COVID-19. In Biomicrofluidics, scientists report a membrane-based invention that can concentrate the virus content of a sample of urine or saliva, allowing it to be detected.