Suiting Up to Ensure Safe Environments for All Youth Athletes

The National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute, a joint initiative between the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and Sanford Health, launches policy agenda to protect kids participating in sports. The institute to work with state legislators to act on seven critical areas of athlete health.

NCCN Policy Summit Explores How COVID-19 Pandemic Can Lead to Improvements in Cancer Care

NCCN Policy Summit examines the impact of the past year on oncology policy in the U.S., such as resuming recommended screening and clinical trials, applying health innovations from the COVID-19 pandemic to cancer treatment, and addressing systemic inequalities that lead to disparities in outcomes.

People prefer ‘natural’ strategies to reduce atmospheric carbon

A cross-disciplinary collaboration led by Jonathon Schuldt, associate professor of communication at Cornell University, found that a majority of the U.S. public is supportive of soil carbon storage as a climate change mitigation strategy, particularly when that and similar approaches are seen as “natural” strategies.

Policing Expert Available to Discuss Derek Chauvin Verdict, Police Policy and Californians’ Views on Police Reform

Christine Gardiner, professor of criminal justice at California State University, Fullerton, is available to discuss the verdict of the Derek Chauvin trial, policing policy, and results from a California public opinion poll conducted in August of 2020, within months of…

FIGHTING MATERNAL MORTALITY WITH BETTER DATA AND A POWERFUL PARTNERSHIP

MITRE’s Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Interactive Dashboard—expanded in both capacity and reach—unleashes new opportunities to address the inequities in maternal health. Our collaboration with the March of Dimes promises even more impact.

The 20 best places to tackle U.S. farm nitrogen pollution

A pioneering study of U.S nitrogen use in agriculture has identified 20 places across the country where farmers, government, and citizens should target nitrogen reduction efforts.

The 20 nitrogen “hotspots of opportunity”–which appear on a striking map–represent a whopping 63% of the total surplus nitrogen balance in U.S. croplands, but only 24% of U.S. cropland area.

Nitrogen inputs are so high in these areas that farmers can most likely reduce nitrogen use without hurting crop yields.

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices

Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat.

Rutgers Legal Expert Available to Discuss Environmental, Climate Change Priorities

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 21, 2021) – Rutgers University Professor Cymie R. Payne, an expert on United States and international environmental laws, is available for interviews on how the administration of President Biden can strengthen laws and regulations and efforts to…

Discriminatory policies threaten care for transgender, gender diverse individuals

The Endocrine Society and the Pediatric Endocrine Society oppose legislative efforts to block transgender and gender diverse individuals from accessing gender-affirming medical and surgical care, the two medical societies said in a joint policy perspective published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Rutgers Institute for Health Receives $10M to Study Health and Well-Being in New Jersey

The Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research has received $10 million in funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Rutgers University to support the New Jersey Population Health Cohort study – the largest study to date to explore factors that influence health and well-being in New Jersey.

Ultraprocessed Food: Addictive, Toxic, and Ready for Regulation

Abstract Past public health crises (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, opioids, cholera, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lead, pollution, venereal disease, even coronavirus (COVID-19) have been met with interventions targeted both at the individual and all of society. While the healthcare community is…

The GovLab launches collective intelligence to solve public problems

A new report from The Governance Lab at NYU Tandon has found organizations that tap the wisdom of the crowd are better at solving many of the problems that trouble governments, including those exacerbated by COVID-19, to sustainable development, climate change and disaster response.

The report, entitled Using Collective Intelligence to Solve Public Problems, examined global examples of how public institutions are using new technology to take advantage of the collective action and collective wisdom of people in their communities and around the world to address problems like climate change, loneliness and natural disaster response. The GovLab has also published 30 case studies

Statement: Science Must Drive Clinical Practice, Public Health Policy

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) has released a position statement calling for all healthcare decision-making to be anchored in the best scientific evidence available. The statement reinforces nursing professionals’ commitment to following the best evidence possible to provide care for patients and families.

Vulnerable Populations: How Will They Cope and Adapt This Hurricane Season?

Researchers will study areas that include counties in south and central Florida and the Panhandle, which are still recovering from Hurricanes Michael and Irma, and which saw an influx of displaced individuals from Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. They will examine resilience of individuals and households, including their coping and adaptive capacities during a busy hurricane season in the midst of pandemic. The research will advance knowledge on several topics related to housing, health and hazards.

How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation

How can some of world’s biggest problems – climate change, food security and land degradation – be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Global Change Biology.

During Virtual Hill Visits, Rheumatology Leaders Urge Lawmakers to Provide Targeted COVID-19 Relief for Healthcare Practices

In virtual meetings with lawmakers and on Twitter tomorrow, physician and health professional leaders from the American College of Rheumatology are sounding the alarm about the economic impact of COVID-19 on rheumatology practices and the urgent need for targeted relief to help specialty practices remain solvent and continue to serve patients.

New Study Suggests U.S. COVID-19 Cases Could Have Been 35 Times Higher Without These Measures

The authors found the closing of entertainment businesses — such as restaurants, movie theaters and gyms — and shelter-in-place orders — such as Gov. Andy Beshear’s “Healthy at Home” initiative — resulted in a dramatic reduction in COVID-19 cases.

How Will COVID-19 Impact the 2020 Election? University of Kentucky Experts Have Insight

While the 2020 general election is still more than six months away, the COVID-19 pandemic has sidelined much of the presidential campaign. Meanwhile, state and county officials across the U.S. are already preparing ways to allow voters to cast their ballots safely. University of Kentucky faculty members with expertise in politics have been closely monitoring the evolving situation.

New in the Hastings Center Report: A call to confront mistrust in the US health care system

“For those who have faced exploitation and discrimination at the hands of physicians, the medical profession, and medical institutions, trust is a tall order and, in many cases, would be naïve,” writes Laura Specker Sullivan in “Trust, Risk, and Race in American Medicine.”