“CrashCourse” Program Makes Teen Football Players More Aware of Concussion Risks and Why to Report Symptoms

How can we teach high school football players about concussion risks to prevent delays in reporting, diagnosing and treating this serious medical condition? The “CrashCourse” program appears more effective than older approaches when it comes educating teen athletes on the urgency of reporting concussion symptoms, according to a new study presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting.

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For young athletes, inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance

Most young athletes don’t get enough sleep – and that may significantly affect their sports performance, according to a paper in the November issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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ACSM and National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute Named NYSS ChampionSM

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recognize ACSM and the National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute as two of the first organizations to join the National Youth Sports Strategy Champion program, helping to foster a lifelong love of sports and physical activity for youth.

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CHOP Study Demonstrates How to Collect True Impact Incidents from Head Impact Sensors in Youth Sports

An increased awareness of concussion risks in young athletes has prompted researchers to use a variety of head impact sensors to measure frequency and severity of impacts during sports. A new study from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) shows these head sensors can record a large number of false positive impacts during real game play. The CHOP team’s study emphasizes that an extra step to video-confirm the sensor data is essential for research and for use of this data in injury prevention strategies for player safety.

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NEW STUDY FINDS THAT STUDENT ATHLETES AT MORE THAN HALF OF ALL HIGH SCHOOLS IN CALIFORNIA ARE AT GREATER RISK OF INJURY DUE TO LACK OF APPROPRIATE CARE OR UNQUALIFED PERSONNEL OVERSEEING THEIR HEALTH AND SAFETY

More than half (54.6%) of California schools reported that they either did not employ an AT (47.6%) or employed unqualified health personnel (UHP) in the role of AT (7%).

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