PARADE/CLEVELAND CLINIC HEALTHY NOW SURVEY REVEALS: TECHNOLOGY’s GROWING INFLUENCE ON HEALTH BEHAVIORS

October 11, 2019 – Who are Americans more likely to take health advice from…their doctors or an Instagram influencer? Would U.S. adults rather talk or text? Socialize in real life or scroll through social media? Parade magazine and Cleveland Clinic joined forces for the second year in a row to poll Americans on their adoption of health, lifestyle, fitness and diet trends and takes a look at how social media has helped move health practices that once seemed extreme into the mainstream.

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Scientists Discover New Antibiotic in Tropical Forest

Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a “plant probiotic,” more robust plants and other antibiotics. Probiotics, which provide friendlier bacteria and health benefits for humans, can also be beneficial to plants, keeping them healthy and more robust. The new antibiotic, known as phazolicin, prevents harmful bacteria from getting into the root systems of bean plants, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Nature Communications.

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Health Startups Have New Home for Growth, Opportunity at UT Austin

Health product innovators and entrepreneurs in the Texas capital are getting a leg up thanks to a new partnership at The University of Texas at Austin between the Jon Brumley Texas Venture Labs (JBTVL) at the McCombs School of Business and the Texas Health CoLab at Dell Medical School. The unique collaboration is intended to accelerate the pace of health product innovation in Austin.

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Protein Intake, Physical Function in Older Adults Differs Dramatically by Ethnicity/Race

A cross-sectional study examined differences in protein intake, nutritional status, and physical health (muscle strength and function) among older African Americans, European Americans and Hispanic Americans. The study is the first to evaluate these physical health indicators in association with protein intake among different racial/ethnic groups. A contributing factor to the age-related changes in muscle is insufficient protein intake by older adults. Findings highlight the need for further education and evidence-based interventions to support this vulnerable population.

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