Study finds nanomedicine targeting lymph nodes key to triple negative breast cancer treatment

Research from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center could provide a new approach to treating an aggressive form of breast cancer. A study led by Duxin Sun, Ph.D., found that targeting the immune microenvironment in lymph nodes and tumors simultaneously led to long-term tumor remission in mice models of metastatic triple negative breast cancer.

Moffitt Researchers Identify Pathway that Regulates Lipid Synthesis and Contributes to Tumor Survival

In a new study published in the journal Cell Reports, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers show that cancer cells in an acidic environment undergo lipid synthesis and accumulation. The team identified the key signaling molecules responsible for these changes and discovered that these alterations are associated with poor outcomes and disease progression among breast cancer patients.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for May 4, 2022

Featured studies include clinical advances with a new combination therapy targeting angiogenesis in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer and a promising immunotherapy combination for kidney cancer, plus laboratory studies that focus on targeting ferroptosis in specific lung cancers, developing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms, and characterizing racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer early detection.

Does Multiple Sclerosis Play a Role in Cancer Screening and Diagnosis?

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less likely to have breast cancers detected through cancer screenings than women without MS, according to new research published in the April 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Conversely, researchers also found that people with MS are more likely to have colorectal cancers detected at an early stage than those without MS.

SUSAN G. KOMEN® NAMES TOP BREAST CANCER EXPERTS AS SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Susan G. Komen has appointed 10 world-renowned breast cancer researchers and two patient advocates to serve as advisors to the organization. They join a distinguished group of breast cancer researchers, clinicians and advocates who help guide Komen’s work so that people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer can live longer, better lives.

Antioxidant, Inflammation Levels May Reveal New Diagnostic Tool for Breast Cancer

A new study that analyzes levels of antioxidants and stress markers in the blood could lead to a new diagnostic tool for breast cancer. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Light Therapy Improves Breast Cancer Survivors’ Sleep

Cancer alters the circadian rhythm functions, which results in fatigue and disrupted sleep/wake patterns. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Dr. Horng-Shiuann Wu studies how using extremely bright light to “reset” a female breast cancer patient’s internal clock can help them sleep better.​​​​​​​

Comparing African and European populations leads to breast cancer risk discovery

By comparing genetic data from European and African population groups, scientists at UChicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified seven new regions of the human genome that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. The findings were published in Nature Communications.

Breast cancer patients can navigate care at home with a new skills kit

With the exception of skin cancers, breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women. This year more than 330,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed according to the American Cancer Society. The COVID-19 pandemic has further challenged these vulnerable patients as well as the thousands of others currently going through cancer treatment and recovery, making some hesitant to leave their homes for necessary screenings, treatments, and consults.

$2.1 Million Gift Launches Comprehensive Breast Cancer Database

Philanthropists Richard and Carol Dean Hertzberg have committed $2.1 million to develop and maintain the Dean-Hertzberg Breast Cancer Database System Initiative at UC San Diego Health Moores Cancer Center to support the work of Anne Wallace, MD and her collaborators at Moores Cancer Center.

Intervention eliminates Black-white gaps in survival from early-stage breast and lung cancer

A new study shows that system-level changes to the way cancer care is delivered can also eliminate Black-white disparities in survival from early-stage lung and breast cancer. By identifying and addressing obstacles that kept patients from finishing radiation treatments for cancer, the intervention improved five-year survival rates for all patients and erased the survival gap between Black and white patients. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

High-dose radiation thwarts tumor growth in patients with advanced lung cancer

High-dose radiation therapy can be used to lengthen progression-free survival for people with advanced lung cancer when systemic therapy has not fully halted the growth or spread of metastases, according to a new study. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

Secure media credentials to cover “Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes in Black Women: Time for a Change”

A live press briefing featuring a panel of nationally recognized experts will follow their presentation “Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes in Black Women: Time for a Change” at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) annual ACS Clinical Congress being held virtually (October 23–27).

Active Living After Cancer program improves physical functioning of breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer survivors who participated in Active Living After Cancer, an evidence-based 12-week group program, markedly increased their physical activity and ability to accomplish the basic pursuits of daily life, researchers from The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Cancer.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for September 22, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a new method to measure breast cancer response, a new immunotherapy approach for multiple myeloma, characterization of the immune landscape of cholangiocarcinoma, a new contrast agent to improve molecular imaging techniques, and new treatment targets in breast, gynecologic and pancreatic cancers.

ESMO: HER2-targeting antibody-drug improves progression-free survival for women with deadly form of advanced breast cancer

A study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that treating women with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer with the HER2-targeting antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) significantly prolongs the length of time the disease is controlled and cancer growth is halted when compared to the current standard of care, trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1).

How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

Using a virus that grows in black-eyed pea plants, researchers developed a new therapy that could keep metastatic cancers from spreading to the lungs, as well as treat established tumors in the lungs.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Expert Available for Comment on Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

New Brunswick, N.J., August 23, 2021 – Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy treatment that targets a tumor in a very precise way, emerging as a unique modality for breast cancer due to the ability to minimize exposure surrounding healthy…

Artificial Intelligence aids in discovery of new prognostic biomarkers for breast cancer

Scientists at Case Western Reserve University have used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to identify new biomarkers for breast cancer that can predict whether the cancer will return after treatment—and which can be identified from routinely acquired tissue biopsy samples of early-stage breast cancer.

Statins may improve survival for triple-negative breast cancer patients

A study led by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a significant association between cholesterol-lowering drugs commonly known as statins and survival rates of triple-negative breast cancer patients. Since statins are low in cost, easy to access and produce minimal side effects, this could have an important impact on outcomes for this aggressive disease.

Shih-Ting (Christine) Wang: Designing Materials for Biomedicine

Using DNA-based assembly, the Center for Functional Nanomaterials postdoc has assembled functional proteins into ordered lattices and coated nanostructures for drug delivery.

Mayo Clinic scientists advance breast, ovarian cancer research with cryo-electron microscopy

Using advanced imaging technology, Mayo Clinic scientists have provided an unprecedented understanding of the BRCA1-BARD1 protein complex, which is often mutated in patients with breast or ovarian cancer. Their paper, published in Nature, identifies aspects of how BRCA1-BARD1 functions, supporting future translational research, cancer prevention efforts and drug development.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop Novel Therapy That Could Be Effective in Many Cancers

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that shows high effectiveness in vitro at disrupting a biological pathway that helps cancer survive, according to a paper published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in July.

Mount Sinai researchers develop novel therapy that could be effective in many cancers

New York, NY (July 23, 2021) — Mount Sinai researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that shows high effectiveness in vitro at disrupting a biological pathway that helps cancer survive, according to a paper published in Cancer Discovery , a…

Mayo Clinic research suggests women over 65 be offered hereditary cancer genetic testing

A new study by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, along with collaborators from the CARRIERS consortium, suggests that most women with breast cancer diagnosed over 65 should be offered hereditary cancer genetic testing. The study was published Thursday, July 22, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FAU Nursing Faculty Member Receives NIH K01 Grant for Breast Cancer Research

Tarsha Jones, Ph.D., principal investigator and an assistant professor of nursing at FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, has received the National Institute of Health (NIH) K01 Career Development Award, a five-year, $772,525 award for a project titled, “Decision Support for Multigene Panel Testing and Family Risk Communication among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Young Breast Cancer Survivors.”

Bidirectional impact of cardiovascular disease, cancer in Blacks focus of new AHA center

Cardiovascular disease and cancer, the nation’s top two killers, share common ground like obesity and chronic inflammation, as well as a disproportionate impact on Black Americans. A new American Heart Association-funded center at the Medical College of Georgia is working…