Study finds risk of leukemia higher than expected in children with Down syndrome

The risk of childhood leukemia among kids with Down syndrome is higher than predicted, according to a new study led by UC Davis and UC San Francisco researchers. Early diagnosis remains critical.

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Catching more breast cancers when mammograms are limited

In one of the largest research projects of its kind, a new study published in JAMA Network Open looks at nearly 900,000 individuals and close to 2 million mammograms to come up with a new way to detect the most breast cancer cases with the fewest exams.

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CT Colonography Rates Bolstered by US Preventive Service Task Force Recommendation

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study found a 50% increase in screening computed tomography colonography (CTC) rates after the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) announcement of the updated recommendation on colorectal cancer screening in 2016. This American Journal of Preventive Medicine study evaluated the association among the updated recommendation, patient cost sharing, and the uptake of colorectal cancer screening through CTC in the privately insured population.

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New Study Reveals Radiologists Now Perform the Majority of Lumbar Punctures in the Medicare Population

This new American Journal of Neurology (AJNR) study found that radiologists performed 54% of lumbar puncture procedures (LPs) in 2017, representing significant growth over the 14 year longitudinal study. This study evaluated trends in performance of LPs by various medical specialties from 2003 to 2017 and raises the question of whether the shift of LPs from other specialties to radiology is justified. The results were also featured at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, 2021.

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Radiology Societies Urge HHS to Reject Proposed Deregulation of Specific AI Software

In a March 5, 2021 letter from the American College of Radiology® (ACR®), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) urged US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) officials to reject a “midnight” proposal by the immediate-past HHS Secretary to permanently exempt certain medical devices from the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) 510(k) premarket notification requirements.

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Study demonstrates remote supervision could speed adoption of new technologies into clinical practice

In a new article published in the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, the NeuroInterventional Radiology (NIR) team at Lahey Hospital and Medical Center (LHMC) described their preliminary experience with remote supervision for the introduction in clinical practice of a new technology for the treatment of brain aneurysms.

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AAPM Advances Best Practices for Patient Safety in X-Ray Imaging

Since April 2019, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has championed a critical way to make X-ray imaging safer and more effective by discontinuing the long-standing practice of placing leaded shields over patient gonads. Today, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements released a statement recommending the discontinuation of routine shielding of patient gonads during X-ray imaging exams and AAPM stands ready to help imaging providers, patients and caregivers to understand and adopt these new best practices – practices that will ensure safer and higher-quality X-ray exams.

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American College of Radiology Education Center Launches Virtual Micro-Courses

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Education Center is expanding its offerings to include a series of micro-courses covering a variety of specialties. Each micro-course begins with one-week online access to pre-recorded lectures and cases for a self-paced deep dive on the most challenging topics in a chosen specialty, followed by a virtual two-hour group case review and Q&A with faculty via Zoom and two additional days to review the case content.

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Study Finds that 41% of Radiologists Changed Jobs Over 4 Years

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study showed that nearly 20% of radiologists separated from a practice in a single year, indicating that radiology is impacted by broader workforce trends toward job hopping. This Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR) study tracked recent trends and characteristics of radiologist-practice separation across the United States.

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¬Children With Asymptomatic Brain Bleeds As Newborns Show Normal Brain Development At Age 2

A study by UNC School of Medicine researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage.

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Forty studies later, a Keck Medicine of USC radiologist reveals what he has learned about COVID-19

Ali Gholamrezanezhad, MD, a clinical emergency radiologist with Keck Medicine of USC, was one of the first researchers to study COVID-19 in early 2020. Today, Gholamrezanezhad has co-authored more than 40 papers on the disease, gathering and analyzing a wide array of data and patient scans. He offers his unique insights into a virus that has infected more than 43 million people worldwide.

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New Study Exposes Potential Expansion Barriers to Functional MRI for Medicare Patients

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study found that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) steadily increased from 2007-2014 but has now been static due to potential expansion barriers. This diagnostic imaging method is critical in determining brain functions as well as for assessing the potential risks of surgery or other invasive treatments of the brain. This American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR) study is the first of its kind to assess the nationwide adoption of fMRI.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Awards and Appointments

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces its most recent awards and appointments for the institution’s physicians, scientists, nurses, and staff.

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American College of Radiology and University of Pennsylvania Create Joint Program to Advance Quantitative Imaging Diagnostics and Analytics

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Center for Research and Innovation™ (CRI) is pleased to announce a new collaborative effort with the Center for Biomedical Image Computing & Analytics (CBICA) in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). The collaboration will leverage the ACR’s industry-leading research infrastructure and Penn’s scientific expertise in a joint effort to more rapidly advance imaging informatics.

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American College of Radiology Releases New and Updated ACR Appropriateness Criteria

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) today released an update to its ACR Appropriateness Criteria® (ACR AC), which includes 198 diagnostic imaging and interventional radiology topics with 965 clinical variants covering more than 1,700 clinical scenarios. This update includes six new and 10 revised topics. All topics include a narrative, evidence table and a literature search summary. Patient-friendly summaries , which are intended to help patients understand what tests are appropriate for their situation and enhance communication from ordering physicians and radiologists, are available for a number of topics as well.

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Mammogram device under development to use light, ultrasound to better screen patients for breast cancer

The University at Buffalo has received a four-year, $1.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a new, portable breast-imaging system that has the potential to better identify breast cancer.

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New Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Study Investigates Oncologic Diagnostic Imaging Trends

Imaging today plays essential roles in the management of almost all non-cutaneous cancers, influencing diagnosis, assessment of prognosis, treatment selection, and therapeutic monitoring. Achieving consistently high-quality oncologic imaging (OI) interpretations poses an increasing challenge in light of the growing complexity of such imaging and of oncologic care. This new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study, published on in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), characterizes national trends in oncologic imaging utilization.

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General Electric Healthcare Chooses UH to Clinically Evaluate First-of-its-kind Imaging System

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center physicians completed evaluation for the GE Healthcare Critical Care Suite, and the technology is now in daily clinical practice – flagging between seven to 15 collapsed lungs per day within the hospital. No one on the team could have predicted the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, but this technology and future research with GEHC may enhance the capability to improve care for COVID-19 patients in the ICU. Critical Care Suite is now assisting in COVID and non-COVID patient care as the AMX 240 travels to intensive care units within the hospital.

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How COVID-19 Shifted Inpatient Imaging Utilization

As medical resources shifted away from elective and non-urgent procedures toward emergent and critical care of COVID-19 patients, departments were forced to reconfigure their personnel and resources. In particular, many Radiology practices rescheduled non-urgent and routine imaging according to recommendations from the American College of Radiology (ACR). This new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study, published online in the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR), evaluates the change in the inpatient imaging volumes and composition mix during the COVID-19 pandemic within a large healthcare system.

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New Study Finds COVID-19 Impact on Community Radiology Practices

The COVID-19 pandemic has quickly spread across all 50 United States. Associated recommendations that healthcare facilities defer non-urgent visits, tests, and procedures led many imaging facilities to temporarily curtail most of their non-urgent services. This new Neiman Institute study characterizes the recent declines in non-invasive imaging volumes at community practices.

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American College of Radiology Selected as Imaging Partner for VIRUS COVID-19 Registry

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Center for Research and Innovation™ (CRI) was selected by the Society of Clinical Care Medicine (SCCM) to serve as the overall imaging repository for the Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study (VIRUS) COVID-19 Registry. The study aims to create a real time registry of current ICU and hospital care patterns to allow evaluation of safety and observational effectiveness of COVID-19 practices.

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American College of Radiology Announces COVID-19 Imaging Research Registry

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Center for Research and Innovation™ (CRI) is pleased to announce the development of the COVID-19 Imaging Research Registry (CIRR), an effort by the ACR CRI and the ACR Data Science Institute® in collaboration with the ACR and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR).

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University of Maryland School of Dentistry Offers Certificate in Oral Health Science Program for Non-Dental Health Care Providers

The curriculum is designed to help clinicians recognize and manage oral health infections, diseases, and systemic conditions to more effectively and efficiently improve overall health for their patients.

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American College of Radiology and RAD-AID Collaborate to Support Global Health Radiology Education

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) and RAD-AID are working to enhance the delivery of ACR Case in Point to RAD-AID’s partnered, resource-poor hospitals in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). These efforts will strengthen the accessibility and quality of training materials in various medically underserved regions around the world.

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New Study Evaluates the COVID-19 Impact on Imaging Volumes

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic many radiology departments have experienced a rapid decline in imaging case volumes. This new study, funded by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute and published online in Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), evaluates the impact of the pandemic on imaging case volumes using real-world data from a large healthcare institution.

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Howard B. Fleishon, MD, MMM, FACR Announced Chair of the ACR Board of Chancellors

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) announced Howard B. Fleishon, MD, MMM, FACR as chair of the ACR Board of Chancellors (BOC). Jacqueline A. Bello, MD, FACR, will serve as vice chair, Geraldine B. McGinty, MD, MBA, FACR, will serve as president and Alexander M. Norbash, MD, MS, FACR will serve as vice president. The new officers will take office immediately following the ACR 2020 Meeting, held entirely online.

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New Research Finds Radiology Generalists Work as Multispecialists

General radiologists serve an essential role in the national radiologist workforce by offering broad radiological skills that help their practices meet a variety of geographic and after-hour coverage needs. Importantly, generalists have a particular role in ensuring patient access to radiological services for small and rural radiology groups. While subspecialty radiologists practice patterns have been well studied, relatively little is known about practice patterns of general radiologists. This new study, published in Academic Radiology, characterizes the practice patterns of general radiologists, who represent the majority of practicing radiologists in the US.

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American College of Radiology Updates ACR Appropriateness Criteria

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) today released an update to its ACR Appropriateness Criteria®, which includes 193 diagnostic imaging and interventional radiology topics with 942 clinical variants covering more than 1,680 clinical scenarios. This update includes four new and 12 revised topics.

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Artificial Intelligence Enables Rapid COVID-19 Lung Imaging Analysis at UC San Diego Health

With support from Amazon Web Services, UC San Diego Health physicians are using AI in a clinical research study aimed at speeding the detection of pneumonia, a condition associated with severe COVID-19.

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