20th Anniversary of Sept. 11 Attacks: Rutgers Experts Available

Rutgers University–New Brunswick faculty experts are available to discuss repercussions from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 20 years ago in the United States and around the world.  John J. Farmer, Jr. Farmer, former senior counsel and team leader of the…

World Trade Center Responders with the Greatest Exposure to Toxic Dust Have a Higher Likelihood of Liver Disease

Mount Sinai researchers have found evidence for the first time that World Trade Center responders had a higher likelihood of developing liver disease if they arrived at the site right after the attacks as opposed to working at Ground Zero later in the rescue and recovery efforts. Their study links the increase in liver disease risk to the quantity of toxic dust the workers were exposed to, which was greatest immediately after the September 11, 2001, attacks.

Elevated Leukemia Incidence Is Found in World Trade Center Rescue and Recovery Workers

Responders who worked at the World Trade Center site after the attacks on September 11, 2001, have an increased overall cancer incidence compared to the general population, particularly in thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, and, for the first time ever reported, leukemia, according to a Mount Sinai study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum in January.