New AAD survey: Only a third of Americans are concerned about skin cancer despite nearly 70% having at least one risk factor

With the first day of summer right around the corner, many Americans will increasingly head to the beach or water parks to cool down, but will they turn up their efforts to protect their skin from the sun? A new American Academy of Dermatology survey shows that despite skin cancer being the most common cancer in the U.S., only about one-third of adults are concerned about developing the disease, even though nearly 70% say they have at least one risk factor for skin cancer.

Health, safety tips for summer activities: IU experts available to comment

As Memorial Day weekend approaches, many people have plans to enjoy outdoor activities in the warmer weather. And while we have vaccines to protect against COVID-19, there are other safety measures to keep in mind while having fun in the…

Skin cancer expert available during Melanoma Awareness Month and as summer approaches

As summer approaches and outdoor activities increase, cancer expert William Wooden, M.D., reminds everyone to practice sun safety to protect against skin cancer. Wooden specializes in melanoma research at Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center and is…

How to Check Your Nails for Melanoma

When checking the body for signs of skin cancer, many people may only think to check their skin. However, board-certified dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s important to check the nails, too. Although rare, skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — can develop under and around the fingernails and toenails.

TELL “SKIN CANCER, TAKE A HIKE!™” DURING STEPS CHALLENGE FOR SKIN CANCER AWARNESS MONTH

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans during their lifetime. To help raise awareness of skin cancer prevention and detection, the American Academy of Dermatology will host Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™, a month-long steps challenge, beginning Sat., May 1 in recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month. The participant-driven fundraising event — part of the AAD’s SPOT Skin Cancer™ campaign to create a world without skin cancer — aims to log 9,500 miles across the country in honor of the approximately 9,500 people who are diagnosed with skin cancer every day.

Tanning Beds and Skin Cancer: Heeding the Call to Action

Public health officials and researchers have become increasingly concerned about the health risks posed by indoor tanning. Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently addressed the importance of increasing efforts to limit indoor tanning among minors in a viewpoint paper published in the April 28 2021 online edition of JAMA Dermatology.

How the Pandemic Has Exacerbated Rates of Skin Cancer

With summer approaching and more and more people getting vaccinated for COVID-19, many San Diegans eagerly anticipate the season best known for outdoor activities. But with more time in the sun comes the need for sun-safe practices. During the pandemic,…

$10 Million Gift to Open the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center at Mount Sinai

With highly trained specialists skilled in caring for different types of melanoma, patients at the Waldman Melanoma and Skin Center will have access to the newest diagnostics and therapies such as Canfield Vectra180 – a 3D whole body imaging system that captures nearly the entire skin surface in macro quality resolution, and will be able to capture early skin cancer lesions; Nevisense—a safe diagnostic support tool utilizing Electrical Impedence Spectroscopy (EIS) which is applied as a harmless electrical signal to the skin; Vivascope 1500—a non-invasive confocal imaging system which offers a non-invasive way to image the skin to the superficial collagen layers; and innovative technologies which non-invasively collects skin cells through adhesive patches rather than a scalpel to diagnose atypical pigmented lesions (or moles) at high risk for melanoma.

NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis

NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis When caught early, skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — is highly treatable. However, from March to May 2020 during the peak…

Weizmann Institute of Science and Colleagues Show How Cancer Cells Hurt Themselves to Hurt Immune Cells More

Melanoma is skilled at evading therapies, with its cells going so far as to starve in order to stop the immune cells that would eradicate them. A team from the Weizmann Institute, including Prof. Yardena Samuels; the Netherlands Cancer Institute; and the University of Oslo have revealed one of melanoma’s tricks – never before seen in human cells – and a therapeutic target.

Plastic Surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS Joins Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group

Mountainside Medical Group announced today that plastic surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS, has joined the practice.

Dr. Coons is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Plastic Surgery. His interests also include hand surgery and reconstructive surgery with an emphasis on breast reconstruction.

FAU Offers New ‘Dermatology Nurse Practitioner Post-graduate Certificate Program’

The nation faces physician shortages in primary care and other specialties, including a projected inadequate supply of dermatologists to meet the demand for service. This innovative program will help to address these gaps and will equip advanced-practice nurses with the tools required to provide high-quality, holistic care for their patients with dermatological conditions.

Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests

A UCLA-led study has found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears — often simultaneously — when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern.
When ordering additional microscopic tests for patients, 90% of the dermatopathologists surveyed cited patient safety as a concern and 71% of them reported malpractice fears. Similarly, when obtaining second reviews from a consulting pathologist or recommending additional surgical sampling, 91% cited safety concerns and 78% malpractice concerns.

WHAT TO WEAR TO PROTECT YOUR SKIN FROM THE SUN

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., and nearly 20 Americans die from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, every day. As more Americans prepare to head outdoors for the 4th of July holiday, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology have an important reminder: dress to protect yourself from the sun. In addition to seeking shade and applying sunscreen, wearing protective clothing goes a long way in protecting you from the sun’s harmful UV rays, which can increase your risk of skin cancer. However, not all clothing is created equal when it comes to sun protection, say dermatologists. Some garments provide better UV protection than others.

NEW AAD SURVEY: 74% OF PARENTS TODAY SAY THEY WORRY ABOUT SUN PROTECTION MORE WITH THEIR CHILDREN THAN THEIR PARENTS DID WITH THEM

With Father’s Day approaching, dermatologists are giving parents two thumbs up for keeping sun protection top of mind for their families. According to a new survey from the American Academy of Dermatology, 74% of parents today say they worry about sun protection more with their children than their parents did with them, and 90% of parents believe it’s important to teach their children healthy habits now so they will keep them when they are adults.

SURVEY: 60% OF AMERICANS SAY THEY HAVE GOTTEN SUNBURNED SO BADLY THEIR CLOTHES WERE UNCOMFORTABLE

Memorial Day — long considered the unofficial start of summer in the U.S. — is quickly approaching, and dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are urging Americans to practice safe sun as they head outdoors, especially as shelter-in-place measures related to COVID-19 begin to lift. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., affecting one in five Americans in their lifetime, yet new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t protecting themselves from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

NEW AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY SURVEY FINDS MOST AMERICANS KNOW SUN PROTECTION IS IMPORTANT, YET MANY AREN’T PROTECTING THEMSELVES

As more Americans head outdoors for warmer weather and fresh air amid “shelter-in-place” measures, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology have an important reminder: practice safe sun. Skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, but new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t taking the necessary steps to protect themselves.

Immunotherapy Before Surgery Could Advance Care of an Aggressive Form of Skin Cancer

In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind study to evaluate the safety of a type of immunotherapy before surgery in patients with an aggressive form of skin cancer, researchers report that the treatment eliminated pathologic evidence of cancer in nearly half of the study participants undergoing surgery. In patients whose tumors respond, this treatment approach offers the potential to reduce the extent of surgery and may also slow or eliminate tumor relapses that often occur after surgery.

ASTRO issues new clinical guideline on radiation therapy for basal and squamous cell skin cancers

A new clinical guideline from ASTRO provides recommendations on the use of radiation therapy to treat patients diagnosed with the most common types of skin cancers. The guideline details when radiation treatments are appropriate as stand-alone therapy or following surgery for BCC and cSCC, and it suggests dosing and fractionation.

6 SKIN CARE TIPS THAT DERMATOLOGISTS USE THEMSELVES

Board-certified dermatologists are experts when it comes to the skin, hair and nails, diagnosing and treating more than 3,000 diseases and conditions, including skin cancer, acne, psoriasis and eczema. They also help patients address their cosmetic concerns, such as tattoo removal, scarring, and aging skin. But do you ever wonder what skin care tips dermatologists use themselves to maintain healthy skin? In recognition of National Healthy Skin Month in November, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are sharing six skin care tips they recommend to all of their patients—and actually use themselves.

NEARLY $40,000 RAISED FOR SKIN CANCER PREVENTION AND DETECTION THROUGH “SKIN CANCER, TAKE A HIKE!™”

This fall, a group of skin cancer advocates and their families and friends in both Chicago and Phoenix hiked three miles to say “Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!” Together, they raised nearly $40,000 for SPOT Skin Cancer™ benefiting the American Academy of Dermatology’s skin cancer prevention and detection programs, including free skin cancer screenings, sunscreen dispensers, and permanent shade structures in outdoor spaces where children learn and play.

Huntsman Cancer Institute Introduces Cancer Screening and Education Bus to the Community

Today Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah unveiled the Cancer Screening and Education bus. This new, state-of-the-art mobile outreach clinic brings HCI’s clinical and educational expertise and the latest screening technology to residents across Utah, including those who live in distant geographic areas and rural communities.

Huntsman Cancer Institute Introduces Cancer Screening and Education Bus to the Community

Today Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah unveiled the Cancer Screening and Education bus. This new, state-of-the-art mobile outreach clinic brings HCI’s clinical and educational expertise and the latest screening technology to residents across Utah, including those who live in distant geographic areas and rural communities.