MAKEUP TIPS FOR ACNE-PRONE SKIN

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting up to 50 million Americans annually. Since acne-prone skin is sensitive, people with acne may find that certain makeup products, such as foundations and concealers, worsen acne or cause new breakouts. As the holidays approach and people start preparing for parties and other festivities, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s okay for acne patients to wear makeup. The key, they say, is to select cosmetics that don’t cause acne and establish a skin care routine that works for your skin type.

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6 SKIN CARE TIPS THAT DERMATOLOGISTS USE THEMSELVES

Board-certified dermatologists are experts when it comes to the skin, hair and nails, diagnosing and treating more than 3,000 diseases and conditions, including skin cancer, acne, psoriasis and eczema. They also help patients address their cosmetic concerns, such as tattoo removal, scarring, and aging skin. But do you ever wonder what skin care tips dermatologists use themselves to maintain healthy skin? In recognition of National Healthy Skin Month in November, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are sharing six skin care tips they recommend to all of their patients—and actually use themselves.

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NEARLY $40,000 RAISED FOR SKIN CANCER PREVENTION AND DETECTION THROUGH “SKIN CANCER, TAKE A HIKE!™”

This fall, a group of skin cancer advocates and their families and friends in both Chicago and Phoenix hiked three miles to say “Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!” Together, they raised nearly $40,000 for SPOT Skin Cancer™ benefiting the American Academy of Dermatology’s skin cancer prevention and detection programs, including free skin cancer screenings, sunscreen dispensers, and permanent shade structures in outdoor spaces where children learn and play.

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HOW TO TREAT ECZEMA IN BABIES

Atopic dermatitis (also known as eczema) is a common skin condition in babies. It affects up to 25% of children, and an estimated 60% of people with eczema develop it during their first year of life. While there is no cure, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say most cases can be controlled with a customized skin care plan, which may include moisturizers, prescription medications and strategies to eliminate triggers.

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PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGIST WHO CO-FOUNDED CAMP FOR CHILDREN RECOGNIZED FOR CARE

The American Academy of Dermatology has honored board-certified dermatologist Karen Wiss, MD, FAAD, as a Patient Care Hero for her role in treating a patient born with an extremely rare skin disease caused by a genetic mutation. The condition, known as recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), is commonly called “the butterfly disease,” because it causes skin to be extremely fragile and blister easily after minor rubbing or scratching. It affects fewer than one in 1 million people.

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