Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Awarded $21 Million NIH Grant to Advance Understanding of Aging-Related Hormone

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been awarded a $21 million grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to further advance understanding of an aging-related hormone known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), including its potential role in obesity, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Hot flashes in menopausal women may signal increased risk for heart and metabolic issues

Women experiencing moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms face a three times greater risk for metabolic-dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) compared to those with mild symptom severity, according to research being presented Monday at ENDO 2024, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Boston, Mass.

‘Good’ Fat Metabolism Changes Tied to Estrogen Loss, Not Necessarily to Aging

Brown fat metabolism decreases in older men and women, but the decrease in women is not necessarily tied to age, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism and has been chosen as an APSselect article for May.

Mount Sinai Experts Available for Interview During Women’s Health Awareness Month

  Mount Sinai Experts Available for Interview During Women’s Health Awareness Month  As we continue to recognize May as Women’s Health Awareness Month, and kick off National Women’s Health Week on Sunday, May 12, I want to flag Mount Sinai…

Cleveland Clinic Launches New Women’s Comprehensive Health and Research Center

Cleveland Clinic has announced the launch of its new Women’s Comprehensive Health and Research Center, an initiative dedicated to helping women during midlife and beyond thrive and easily receive the specialized care they need. The center is focused on four key areas: access, connectivity, education, and research and innovation to empower women to navigate their health journey with confidence and clarity. 

Exercise Testing Uncovers Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor in Black Postmenopausal Women

Article title: Exercise testing unmasks exaggerated blood pressure independent of fibrinolytic response in Black but not White postmenopausal females Authors: João L. Marôco, Linda M Szymanski, Tracy Baynard, Bo Fernhall From the authors: “Our findings show that maximal exercise unmasks…

Earlier Menopause Plus High Cardiovascular Risk May Lead to Cognitive Problems Later

Earlier menopause combined with higher risk of cardiovascular disease is linked to an increased risk of thinking and memory problems later, according to a new study published in the April 3, 2024, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In this study, earlier menopause is defined as occurring before age 49.

Why the Top Cause of Death for Women Has Been Ignored

Experts at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai who have studied progress made over decades of research say there’s still a long way to go before medical science fully understands how heart disease is different in women than men.

Podcast: Experts in Health: The menopause and the controversial ‘male menopause’

Professor Eef Hogervorst, Professor of Biological Psychology at Loughborough University, sits down to discuss the factors influencing the menopause, what the best treatment options are, the relationship between oestrogen and dementia, and the controversies surrounding the andropause (the ‘male menopause’).

Menopause and migraines: New findings point to power of prevention

Women who have both migraines and a long-term history of hot flashes and/or night sweats have a slightly higher risk of heart disease and stroke, and young women who have migraines have a higher risk of later persistent menopause symptoms, according to a new pair of papers.

Mount Sinai Receives $4.6 Million From The Pershing Square Foundation to Support Women’s Health Research and Careers for Women in Science

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has received a $4.6 million gift from The Pershing Square Foundation to support women’s health research and advance careers for female scientists

A commonly used tool is suboptimal in predicting osteoporosis fracture risk in younger post-menopausal women

The commonly used U.S version of the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) should not be routinely used to select younger postmenopausal women for bone mineral density testing. But the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) is excellent at identifying women with osteoporosis-level bone mineral density, which is the goal of these screenings, while FRAX is not.

Mayo Clinic study puts price tag on cost of menopause symptoms for women in the workplace

Menopause-related symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, mood changes, sleep disturbances, joint aches and cognitive difficulties damage the quality of life for millions of women. They also can adversely affect women in the workplace. A newly published Mayo Clinic study puts numbers on that cost: an estimated $1.8 billion in lost work time and $28 billion when medical expenses are added, in the U.S. alone.

Breast Cancer Risk Calculator Can Assess Risk of Advanced Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is now the leading cause of global cancer incidence among women but determining who will develop breast cancer is still a challenge for the medical community. A new tool, developed by researchers from UCSF and several other medical institutions, helps to calculate risk for those who may develop advanced breast cancer that goes undiagnosed despite regular screenings.

Menopause symptoms: Mayo Clinic expert outlines hormone and nonhormonal therapies

Menopause, the end of menstrual cycles, can produce symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia and mood changes. Women do not need to suffer in silence: Many treatment options are available. Jewel Kling, M.D., chair of the Division of Women’s Health at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, describes hormonal and nonhormonal therapies.

Phase 3 study finds fezolinetant reduces the frequency and severity of menopausal hot flashes

Fezolinetant significantly reduced the frequency and severity of moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms (VMS), or hot flashes, associated with menopause, according to a Phase 3 industry-sponsored study being presented Saturday at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.

Poll shows impact of menopause and other health issues on older women’s sex lives

Despite stereotypes to the contrary, many older women have active sex lives into their 70s, a new poll shows. But health concerns, including menopause symptoms, often get in the way of intimacy. Even so, only 44% of women with menopause symptoms have discussed treatment with their health care provider. Among those who did receive treatment, 88% felt their symptoms were managed somewhat or very well.

A Prune—Or Six—a Day May Keep Inflammation at Bay

A study in postmenopausal people suggests eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health, reducing inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop a First-in-Class Humanized Antibody Targeting Bone and Fat

Blocking the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) whose levels rise at menopause could solve bone loss and weight gain Senior Author: Mone Zaidi, MD, PhD, MACP, Director of the Mount Sinai Bone Program and Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease) at…

Menopause May Affect Improvements in Exercise Fitness

All women go through menopause, usually between the ages of 46 and 54. Their periods stop, and they can no longer get pregnant. Postmenopausal women also have lower heart function. This study investigated whether menopause influences heart function and exercise…

Why Do More Women Have Alzheimer’s than Men? It’s Not Just from Living Longer

Middle-aged women are more likely than men to have changes in the brain related to Alzheimer’s disease, as detected by imaging, even when there are no differences in thinking and memory. This may be associated with hormonal changes due to menopause, specifically the loss of estrogen, according to a study published in the June 24, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR SKIN DURING MENOPAUSE

By the time they reach menopause — which officially begins one year after a woman’s last period — many women think they have their lives figured out. Careers are well established; children are grown and independent; and there’s more time for leisure and self-care. Yet many women in their 40s and 50s are surprised to suddenly notice changes on their skin, including acne and age spots. Fortunately, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say that while many of these changes are inevitable due to hormones, there is a lot women can do at home to lessen these effects.