Two Mount Sinai Leaders Receive Prestigious Honors from American Heart Association in New York City

Two of Mount Sinai’s top doctors will be honored with prestigious awards at the American Heart Association’s New York City Heart and Stroke Ball, taking place virtually on Wednesday, June 9.

Metal Contamination, Gene Signatures, Bisphenol F, and More Featured in June 2021 Toxicological Sciences

Toxicological Sciences delivers the latest research in toxicology, in areas such as clinical and translational toxicology; emerging technologies, methods, and models; and environmental toxicology.

Weight cycling linked to increased sleep problems in women

Women with a history of weight cycling – losing and regaining 10 pounds or more, even once – have increased rates of insomnia and other sleep problems, reports a study in The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, official journal of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Starting Smoking Cessation in Hospitalized Patients Would Reduce Many Premature Deaths

Each year in the U.S., about 30 million hospitalizations occur in individuals 18 and older. Of these, more than 7 million are current cigarette smokers whose average hospital stay is several days. Researchers say that starting smoking cessation therapy during hospitalization and maintaining high adherence post-discharge can markedly improve permanent quit rates in these patients with minimal to no side effects. Cessation therapy also should include long-term counseling and at least 90 days of a prescription drug, specifically, varenicline.

New treatment shows promise in preventing heart failure after heart attack

A study in mice finds treatment with a molecule called MCB-613 repairs heart tissue after a severe heart attack, preventing damage that can lead to heart failure. The findings are being presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Reduced Sitting Time Improves Blood Flow in Brain and Legs

During a regular day, the average person sits for eight to 10 hours. These high levels of sitting time seem linked to an increased risk for both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. First, researchers found that three hours of sitting results…

A New Beat Offers Free Online Seminar Examining Disparities in Cardiovascular Care During Heart Month

The Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is offering a complimentary online seminar, “Tackling Disparities in CV Care: A Closer Look at Hypertension and Heart Failure” on Friday February 26, 2021. The program is part of a joint initiative called A New Beat which advocates for women and minorities rising as leaders in cardiology. It aims to foster careers of female and minority cardiologists, who can be poised to improve access to quality care for underserved populations.

Heart Valve Collaboratory Announces U.S. Food and Drug Administration Participation in Collaborative Community

The Heart Valve Collaboratory (HVC) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) will participate in this “collaborative community”. A medical “collaboratory” is a forum in which multidisciplinary private and public sector members work together on medical device challenges to achieve aligned outcomes, solve shared problems, and leverage collective opportunities, in the interest of improving patient care.

CRF Offers Free Online Seminar to Help People Jump-Start their Heart Health During Heart Month

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, The Big Three: High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, and Diabetes, at 12:00 PM ET on February 22, 2021 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Sonia Tolani, cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar is part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative (WHHI), which empowers women with everyday tools they can use to defy heart disease.

CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure

BOSTON – (December 16, 2020) – Intensive interventions to reduce blood glucose and blood pressure levels in type 2 diabetes reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. In a study led by Alessandro Doria , MD, PhD, MPH, from the Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School, and Rodica Pop Busui, MD, PhD, of the University of Michigan, published online in Diabetes Care , researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%.

Statins can save lives, are they being used?

People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke.In a recent publication in JAMA Network Open, Mayo Clinic researchers identify trends in statin use across the U.S. among people with these diseases, as well as among those who already had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Their data indicate that only about 60% of patients are getting the recommended therapy.

AMSSM Awards $300K Research Grant to Study Cardiac Outcomes in Athletes, Including Those Affected by COVID-19

The AMSSM Collaborative Research Network (CRN) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2020 AMSSM CRN $300K Research Grant. Drs. Jonathan Drezner, Kimberly Harmon and Aaron Baggish will serve as co-principal investigators for their research project titled “Outcomes Registry for Cardiac Conditions in Athletes (the ORCCA Study): a Prospective, Multisite Research Study.”

Cynical Hostility Presents a Potential Pathway to Cardiovascular Disease

Cynical hostility is a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease by preventing a healthy response to stress over time, according to a Baylor University study. Hostility generally is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. But this research explored three types of hostility — emotional, behavioral and cognitive — to see whether one is more predictive of risk factors. Cynical hostility, which is cognitive, poses the greatest risk, based on stress responses.

Trial Finds High Doses of a Prescription Fish Oil Do Not Reduce Major Cardiac Events in High-Risk Patients

Cleveland: Findings from a new Cleveland Clinic study do not support the use of a high dose omega-3 fatty acid formulation to reduce major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with high cardiovascular risk.

Findings from the STRENGTH Trial: Cardiovascular Outcomes With Omega-3 Carboxylic Acids (Epanova) In Patients With High Vascular Risk And Atherogenic Dyslipidemia were reported today during a Late Breaking Science session at the American Heart Association’s virtual Scientific Sessions 2020. The findings were also simultaneously published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

MicroRNA Variation in Circulation Could Explain Sex Differences in Heart Health

Article title: Sex-specific alterations in blood-borne factors in physically inactive individuals are detrimental to endothelial cell functions Authors: Ryan M. Sapp, Rian Q. Landers-Ramos, Daniel D. Shill, Catherine B. Springer, James M. Hagberg From the authors: “Our data suggest alterations in…

Genetic differences in fat shape men and women’s health risks

New findings about body fat help explain the differing health risks men and women face – and set the stage for better, more targeted treatments.

One-size-fits-all is no fit for heart health

From Weight Watchers to wearable tech – wherever we look, there are messages encouraging us to stay fit and healthy. But diets and training methods aside, when it comes to heart health, research from the University of South Australia shows that a far more personalised approach is needed…and it all starts with your genes.

AACC and CDC Partner to Improve Cardiovascular Disease Testing Around the World

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the CDC Foundation that aims to expand lipid testing in resource-limited countries. Improving access to this essential testing could help reduce the high worldwide mortality rate from cardiovascular disease by enabling patients to get treated for this condition earlier.

Mindfulness with Paced Breathing and Lowering Blood Pressure

Now more than ever, Americans and people all over the world are under increased stress, which may adversely affect their health and well-being. Researchers explore the possibility that mindfulness with paced breathing reduces blood pressure. One of the most plausible mechanisms is that paced breathing stimulates the vagus nerve and parasympathetic nervous system, which reduce stress chemicals in the brain and increase vascular relaxation that may lead to lowering of blood pressure.

Is L-citrulline Supplementation Combined with Exercise Training an Effective Strategy to Improve Vascular and Muscular Function in Older Adults?

Aging is associated with increased risk of high blood pressure, an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and loss of muscle fitness (i.e., mass, strength and exercise capacity). Endothelial cells lining the wall of blood vessels maintain normal blood pressure…

Strong and Fit Older Adults Have Younger, Less Stiff Arteries

Large arteries like the aorta are flexible tubes that should easily stretch to accommodate blood flow. They tend to get less flexible with age and chronic medical conditions, a process called arterial stiffening that strongly predicts future cardiovascular disease like…

CRF Will Hold Free Online Seminar on Heart Disease Warning Signs

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, “Get Heart Smart,” on August 24 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Ajay Kirtane, renowned academic cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar, part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative, will focus on common heart disease symptoms, when to talk to your doctor, and when to seek emergency care.

Cutting Down But Not Out: Very-Heavy Drinkers Needn’t Quit Completely for Cardiovascular Benefit

High-risk drinkers who substantially reduce their alcohol use can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite not completely abstaining, according to study findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. CVD encompasses a range of conditions involving the heart or blood vessels, and is the leading cause of death in the US. It is also one of many negative health outcomes associated with heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Reductions in drinking can be defined using World Health Organization (WHO) ‘risk drinking levels’, which classify drinkers into ‘very high’, ‘high’, ‘moderate’ and ‘low’ risk categories based on their average daily alcohol consumption. Previous research has shown that a reduction of two or more levels (for example, from ‘very high’ to ‘moderate’) can lower the risk of multiple health issues, but did not assess the impact on CVD specifically. The latest study has examined associations between reductions in WHO risk drinking

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Physicians, scientists and physician-scientists connect dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes

People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. New research from Mayo Clinic indicates that in patients with one specific type of heart disease ― obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ― the heart increases production of the ACE2 RNA transcript and the translated ACE2 protein.

Could This Plaque Identifying Toothpaste Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body – in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.

Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Earlier detection of women’s vascular health issues can affect heart disease risk, Mayo Clinic study advises

Men and women differ in the way their vascular systems age and the rate at which atherosclerosis ― the hardening of artery walls or buildup of arterial blockage ― progresses over time. These sex- and age-related differences have a direct bearing on a woman’s risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Choosing Common Pain Relievers: It’s Complicated

About 29 million Americans use over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain. Every year in the U.S., NSAID use is attributed to approximately 100,000 hospitalizations and 17,000 deaths. All of these drugs have benefits and risks, but deciding which one to use is complicated for health care providers and their patients. To assist in clinical decision-making, researchers address cardiovascular risks and beyond, which include gastrointestinal and kidney side effects of pain relievers.

Changes in Muscle Nerve Activity in Type 2 Diabetes May Increase Heart Disease Risk

Article title: Augmented pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses to the onset of isometric handgrip in patients with type 2 diabetes Authors: Jennifer R. Vranish, Seth W. Holwerda, Jasdeep Kaur, Paul J. Fadel From the authors: “[Type 2 diabetes] is associated with…