Death, hospital readmission more likely for Black patients after coronary stenting

Black patients who undergo minimally invasive procedures for clogged arteries are more likely to die or be readmitted to the hospital months after the procedure, a Michigan Medicine study finds. Results reveal social determinants of health – including community economic well-being, personal income and wealth, and preexisting health conditions – played a significant role in the outcomes.

Particle radioactivity linked to pollution-associated heart attack and stroke death

Particle radioactivity, a characteristic of air pollution that reflects the colorless, odorless gas radon found in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution, enhances PM2.5 toxicity and increases risk of death from cardiovascular disease, especially from heart attack or stroke, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Rate of food insecurity skyrockets for Americans with cardiovascular disease, study finds

The number of Americans with cardiovascular disease who are food insecure – having limited or uncertain access to adequate food – has more than doubled over the last 20 years, a national study finds. Adults with cardiovascular disease were more than two times likely to be food insecure than those without the cardiovascular disease.

A Consistent Lack of Sleep Negatively Impacts Immune Stem Cells, Increasing Risk of Inflammatory Disorders and Heart Disease

Mount Sinai study also shows catching up on sleep doesn’t reverse possible negative effects on cellular level

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Receives Prestigious Award from Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Mount Sinai Heart leader will be recognized for his exceptional career achievements at the 34th annual conference.

More parents than patients develop PTSD after cardiovascular defibrillators are implanted in their children

More than one in eight children (12%) receiving implanted cardiovascular defibrillators (ICDs) for heart rhythm problems exhibit signs of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new report in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier.

Nationally representative study shows disparities persist in lipid control

Physician-scientists assessed whether lipid concentrations and rates of lipid control changed among U.S. adults from 2007 to 2018. The researchers observed that while mean cholesterol concentrations improved among U.S. adults overall during this time period, there were concerning variations in these trends by race and ethnicity.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Experts Present on the Latest in Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Diseases at 25th Annual Cardiology 2022 Conference

Twenty-six Children’s Hospital Los Angeles physicians, nurses and leaders will serve as presenters at the 25th Annual Cardiology 2022 Conference, themed “The New Normal: Transformation in Pediatric & Congenital Heart Disease.”

New educational alliance between the American Heart Association and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation announced

Two leaders in cardiovascular disease science, research and education, the American Heart Association (Association) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), are joining forces to strengthen and expand educational opportunities focused on advancing the latest research in cardiovascular disease and interventional therapies. The new alliance to produce joint education programs begins immediately with the organizations’ annual scientific meetings this fall. The Association will present educational programming from its annual Scientific Sessions at TCT, and CRF will deliver educational programming from its annual scientific symposium Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) at the Association’s Scientific Sessions, beginning with TCT 2022, September 16-19 in Boston, and the Association’s Scientific Sessions 2022, November 5-7 in Chicago, respectively.

Research links red meat intake, gut microbiome, and cardiovascular disease in older adults

A new study shows older adults who ate about a serving of meat daily had a 22 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease than those who didn’t eat meat, and identifies biologic pathways that help explain the risk. Higher risk and links to gut bacteria were found for red meat, not poultry, eggs, or fish.

Exercise + Sauna = Better Cardiovascular Function

New research suggests that adding a regular 15-minute sauna to an exercise routine may improve cardiovascular risk factors more than exercise alone. The study is the first randomized controlled trial to explore the long-term combination of exercise and sauna bathing in a non-clinical population. It is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Blinding Eye Disease Is Strongly Associated With Heart Disease and Stroke

Patients with a specific form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, are at significant risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to new research from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai.

Stress Testing Can Help Determine Which Patients Are Likely to Benefit From Heart Procedures to Improve Survival

Mount Sinai study can help guide proper treatment course for patients depending on heart function and severity of heart damage

Specific Environmental Exposures may Help Predict Increased Risk of Death from Cardiovascular Disease

A new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai quantifies the cardiovascular risk posed by exposure to specific environmental factors, showing, for example, that air pollution heightens the risk of heart disease mortality by 17 percent.

Physicians debate statin use for patients with cardiovascular disease

In a new Annals ‘Beyond the Guidelines’ feature, a preventive cardiologist and a general internist discuss their approach to the use of statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and how they would apply the guidelines to an individual patient. All ‘Beyond the Guidelines’ features are based on the Department of Medicine Grand Rounds at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston and include print, video, and educational components published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Heart Failure Patients Unvaccinated Against COVID-19 Are Three Times More Likely to Die From It Than Boosted Heart Failure Patients

EMBARGOED UNTIL JUNE 9, 2022, 10AM EST (New York, NY – June 9, 2022) – Heart failure patients who are unvaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are three times more likely to die if infected with the virus…

Analysis finds little evidence of heart problems in men undergoing testosterone treatment

Previous clinical trials have provided insufficient evidence to decide whether testosterone causes heart problems in men during the first year of treatment, according to research being presented Monday at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga., and published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity.

Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer Often Undertreated for Cardiovascular Risk Factors

Adults who survive childhood cancer have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than the general population, yet they are 80% more likely to be undertreated for several cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension (also called high blood pressure), diabetes and high cholesterol, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Targeting Molecular Pathway that Causes Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

UC San Diego researchers describe the underlying signaling pathway that results in pulmonary arterial hypertension and a novel monoclonal antibody therapy that blocks the abnormal blood vessel formation characterizing the disease.

American Heart Association Honors Two Penn Medicine Scientists for Achievements in Research

Two Penn Medicine faculty members, Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, and Daniel Rader, MD, are being honored with prestigious awards from the American Heart Association (AHA) for their achievements in cardiovascular research. Both awards will be presented during the Presidential Session on Sunday, Nov. 14, at the association’s Scientific Sessions 2021.

CRF Announces Free Online Access to TCT 2021

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the digital component of TCT 2021 will now be free for the entire interventional community. After careful consideration and achieving a critical level of support, CRF’s leadership has agreed to fully support this initiative. Complimentary online registration will include access to all content via livestream during the meeting and on-demand access for one year.

Community Health Center Honored for Services Assisting Minority Women

Florida Atlantic University and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center, operated by FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, together with the West Palm Beach YWCA, recently received the “2021 Community Collaborators Award” from Nonprofits First, Inc., for their untiring efforts to mitigate health care disparities among women from minority groups with limited access to quality care.

Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

Mount Sinai Launches the Brain and Body Research Center, Among the First in the U.S.to Focus Solely on How the Brain and Body Interact

Have you ever experienced a stressful time in your life and then caught a cold, or wondered why you feel sad and depressed when you’re sick? It turns out that it’s not all in your head.

Recent research spanning the fields of neuroscience and immunology suggests that when the brain senses a threat in the environment—whether it be physical, psychological, or social—it sends signals via a complex network of peripheral nerves that mobilize the immune system, readying it to protect us from injury.

New NIH research study to investigate psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk among urban African American adults

The Biopsychosocial Health lab from Wayne State University has been awarded $3,590,488 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct a project titled “Stress and Cardiovascular Risk Among Urban African American adults: A Multilevel, Mixed Methods Approach.”