Alcohol Plus Cadmium (via Smoking) Can Amplify Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk

Heavy drinking combined with cadmium exposure — most commonly via smoking — escalates the risk of hypertension, according to a new study. Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects 26 percent of the global population and is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Alcohol consumption and cadmium exposure are known risk factors for hypertension. Exposure to cadmium, a metal that accumulates in body organs, occurs mainly through smoking, which often accompanies heavy drinking. Other cadmium sources include certain foods, air pollution, and wine and beer. Alcohol increases the absorption of cadmium in the body, and evidence suggests that the two substances contribute to hypertension via shared physiological pathways. The new study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is the first known epidemiological investigation of the combined effects of alcohol and cadmium on blood pressure.

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Nicotine Worsens Renal Disease in Smokers with Diabetes, Damages Kidney Filters

New research suggests the toxic effects of nicotine on the kidneys’ filtering function are partly responsible for the progression of diabetes-related kidney disease in people who smoke. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

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Youth Using E-cigarettes Three Times as Likely to Become Daily Cigarette Smokers

University of California San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Sciences researchers report that starting tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, before the age of 18 is a major risk factor for people becoming daily cigarette smokers.

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Emotional dependency on smoking-vaping combo differs from just smoking

Researchers have known that emotions play a critical, but complex role in shaping dependency on smoking and vaping. Now, a team of researchers report that emotions that trigger dependency for people who both smoke and vape may be different from people who just smoke, a finding that may one day help scientists create more personalized programs to help people quit tobacco smoking and vaping.

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Protect Your Bladder: Quit Smoking

Your bladder probably isn’t your favorite topic of conversation, but knowing when to talk to your doctor about it is crucial to your health. If you experience frequent and/or painful urination, or you notice blood in your urine, telling your primary care provider is the first step to diagnosing a problem and finding the right care. More often than not, these symptoms are caused by non-life-threatening conditions like urinary tract infection, overactive bladder or, in men, an enlarged prostate. But they also could be symptoms of bladder cancer, the sixth most common form of cancer in the United States.

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