An Educational Intervention Can Help Vapers Use Their E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking, Moffitt Study Finds

In a new article published in The Lancet Public Health, they report results from a first-of-its kind nationwide study evaluating a targeted intervention aimed at transforming dual users’ e-cigarettes from a product that might maintain smoking into a tool that can be used to aid smoking cessation.

Cigarette Smoke Reduces Aorta’s Ability to Store Elastic Energy, Impairs Blood Vessel Function in Mice

Article title: Structural and functional remodeling of the female Apoe−/− mouse aorta due to chronic cigarette smoke exposure Authors: Yasmeen M. Farra, Jacqueline Matz, Bhama Ramkhelawon, Jessica M. Oakes, Chiara Bellini From the authors: “Our data indicated that exposure to…

Thirdhand smoke impacts gut bacteria for infants, study finds

Infants exposed to thirdhand smoke while hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) show a difference in the composition of their gut microbiome, according to a new study by researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

WashU Expert: FDA menthol ban would benefit Black, younger Americans

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s proposed ban on menthol-flavored cigarettes and all flavored cigars could be particularly beneficial for Black and young people, says an expert on tobacco control at Washington University in St. Louis.“Around 80% of adult Black smokers and more than half of people age 18-34 use menthol brands,” said Todd Combs, research assistant professor at the Brown School who works on the Advancing Science & Practice in the Retail Environment (ASPiRE) project, which uses agent-based modeling to test the potential impact of retail tobacco policies.

Menthol Cigarettes Banned: FDA Takes Bold Action to Save Lives

(April 29, 2021) NY, NY – In a historic move, the Biden Administration announced today its decision to ban menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars. The decision comes after a protracted battle in the courts in which the tobacco industry’s aggressive marketing of menthol cigarettes was challenged by medical and public health organizations, including the American Thoracic Society.

Starting Smoking Cessation in Hospitalized Patients Would Reduce Many Premature Deaths

Each year in the U.S., about 30 million hospitalizations occur in individuals 18 and older. Of these, more than 7 million are current cigarette smokers whose average hospital stay is several days. Researchers say that starting smoking cessation therapy during hospitalization and maintaining high adherence post-discharge can markedly improve permanent quit rates in these patients with minimal to no side effects. Cessation therapy also should include long-term counseling and at least 90 days of a prescription drug, specifically, varenicline.

Quit the Hookah! Lung Damage, Inflammation Is Reversible with Smoking Cessation

New research finds that quitting smoking is an effective way to resolve impaired lung function and airway inflammation associated with waterpipe smoking. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

Nicotine Damages Kidney Filters in Smokers with Diabetes

Article title: Nicotine, smoking, podocytes and diabetic nephropathy Authors: Edgar A. Jaimes, Ming-Sheng Zhou, Mohammed Siddiqui, Gabriel Rezonzew, Runxia Tian, Surya V. Seshan, Alecia N Muwonge, Nicholas J. Wong, Evren U. Azeloglu, Alessia Fornoni, Sandra Merscher, Leopoldo Raij From the authors:…

Marijuana May Increase Risk of Heart Disease in Healthy Adults

Article title: Habitual cannabis use is associated with altered cardiac mechanics and arterial stiffness, but not endothelial function in young healthy smokers Authors: Christian P. Cheung, Alexandra Michelle Coates, Philip J. Millar, Jamie F. Burr From the authors: “Our cross-sectional data…

Alcohol Plus Cadmium (via Smoking) Can Amplify Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk

Heavy drinking combined with cadmium exposure — most commonly via smoking — escalates the risk of hypertension, according to a new study. Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects 26 percent of the global population and is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Alcohol consumption and cadmium exposure are known risk factors for hypertension. Exposure to cadmium, a metal that accumulates in body organs, occurs mainly through smoking, which often accompanies heavy drinking. Other cadmium sources include certain foods, air pollution, and wine and beer. Alcohol increases the absorption of cadmium in the body, and evidence suggests that the two substances contribute to hypertension via shared physiological pathways. The new study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is the first known epidemiological investigation of the combined effects of alcohol and cadmium on blood pressure.

Nicotine Worsens Renal Disease in Smokers with Diabetes, Damages Kidney Filters

New research suggests the toxic effects of nicotine on the kidneys’ filtering function are partly responsible for the progression of diabetes-related kidney disease in people who smoke. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

Youth Using E-cigarettes Three Times as Likely to Become Daily Cigarette Smokers

University of California San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Sciences researchers report that starting tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, before the age of 18 is a major risk factor for people becoming daily cigarette smokers.

Emotional dependency on smoking-vaping combo differs from just smoking

Researchers have known that emotions play a critical, but complex role in shaping dependency on smoking and vaping. Now, a team of researchers report that emotions that trigger dependency for people who both smoke and vape may be different from people who just smoke, a finding that may one day help scientists create more personalized programs to help people quit tobacco smoking and vaping.

Protect Your Bladder: Quit Smoking

Your bladder probably isn’t your favorite topic of conversation, but knowing when to talk to your doctor about it is crucial to your health. If you experience frequent and/or painful urination, or you notice blood in your urine, telling your primary care provider is the first step to diagnosing a problem and finding the right care. More often than not, these symptoms are caused by non-life-threatening conditions like urinary tract infection, overactive bladder or, in men, an enlarged prostate. But they also could be symptoms of bladder cancer, the sixth most common form of cancer in the United States.

Huge Study Links Risky Drinking with Low Social Support and Area of Residence

People who report having low social support are substantially more likely to experience heavy drinking and binge drinking than those who feel more supported, a large European study suggests. The researchers also found strong evidence that risky drinking is associated with areas of residence. Although alcohol use is known to be linked to social, economic, and demographic factors, the research is incomplete; it is not clear to what extent some of these factors, especially environmental conditions, predict dangerous drinking. Investigators in Spain designed a study that was unusual in exploring both heavy drinking and binge drinking and both individual and contextual (environmental) factors. The study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, confirmed individual risk factors and highlighted certain environmental conditions that may help target interventions for those at risk.

One-size-fits-all is no fit for heart health

From Weight Watchers to wearable tech – wherever we look, there are messages encouraging us to stay fit and healthy. But diets and training methods aside, when it comes to heart health, research from the University of South Australia shows that a far more personalised approach is needed…and it all starts with your genes.

Early Life Exposure to Nicotine: Postnatal Neurobehavioral and Metabolic Outcomes and the Development of Childhood Cancers

Animal studies suggest that nicotine may be a key chemical responsible for long-term effects associated with maternal cigarette smoking and increased risk of adverse health consequences in the offspring. However, postnatal outcomes of nicotine exposure from maternal use of e-cigarettes…

Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

UniSA research uncovers treatment combo that sees smokers six times more likely to stop smoking and stay smoke-free

New research led by the University of South Australia has found that smokers who receive the medication varenicline tartrate combined with Quitline counselling following a period of hospitalisation due to a tobacco-related illness are six times more likely to quit smoking than those who attempt to stop without support.

Does smoking increase your risk for dementia and cognitive decline?

Scientists from the Uniformed Services University (USU), Emory University and the University of Vermont have found that cigarette smoking is linked to increased lesions in the brain’s white matter, called white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities, detected by MRI scan, are associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. These findings may help explain the link between smoking and increased rates of dementia and other forms of cognitive decline.

Rutgers Tobacco, Vaping Expert Available to Discuss FDA’s Finalized Enforcement Policy Targeting Flavored E-cigarettes That Appeal to Youth

Rutgers Tobacco, Vaping Expert Available to Discuss FDA’s Finalized Enforcement Policy Targeting Flavored E-cigarettes That Appeal to Youth A Rutgers University expert on tobacco and vaping is available to comment on the FDA’s enforcement policy on unauthorized flavored cartridge-or pod-based…

Do obesity and smoking impact healing after wrist fracture surgery?

Both obesity and smoking can have negative effects on bone health. A recent study led by a team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) examined whether they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, which are among the most common bone fractures.