Vegans who lift weights may have stronger bones than other people on a plant-based diet

People on a plant-based diet who do strength training as opposed to other forms of exercise such as biking or swimming may have stronger bones than other people on a vegan diet, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Vitamin D Supplements May Offset Bone Loss Caused by Diabetes Drug

Vitamin D supplementation may help offset damaging bone loss that occurs in some people who take canagliflozin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Longer treatment with puberty-delaying medication in transgender youth leads to lower bone mineral density

A longer duration of treatment with puberty-delaying medications among transgender youth is associated with lower bone mineral density, according to a new study that will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.

Smoke Break: UNLV Study Strengthens Link Between Smoking and Increased Fracture Risk in Men

It’s no secret that puffing cigarettes is the culprit behind a host of ailments, including respiratory diseases and throat cancer. But a new UNLV study reveals that male smokers — who, demographically, are more likely than women to light up — are also placing themselves at a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis, bone fractures, and early death.

Cedars-Sinai Experts to Present New Research and Discuss Advances in Care for Older Adults

Cedars-Sinai geriatrics experts will present their latest advances in research and care in person at the annual scientific meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) in Orlando May 12-14, sharing innovations to improve both the quality of patient care and quality of life for older adults.

Study shows when people with cerebral palsy are most likely to break bones

Researchers at Michigan Medicine found people with cerebral palsy have fragile bones that present high fracture risk, but at different times across the lifespan compared to the general population. The results helped them develop new sex-specific critical periods of bone health for this population.

First targeted therapy for children with achondroplasia shows persistent height gain for up to two years

Children with achondroplasia, the most common form of disproportionate short stature, grow taller with trends in improved body proportions after two years of daily vosoritide treatment, a new study analysis finds. Results of the industry-sponsored study will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Osteoporosis drug prescribing often does not follow guidelines

Less than one in 10 commercially insured patients in the United States who broke a hip, a major complication of osteoporosis, receive any osteoporosis medical treatment within two calendar quarters of their fracture, according to a study whose results will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

JNCCN: New Research Finds Low Bone Health Testing Rates after Prostate Cancer Treatment

New research in the October 2020 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds the rate of bone mineral density (BMD) testing in people with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has improved in recent years, but remains low.

Army Scientists Propose an Elegant Theory that Could Lead to Stronger Bones for All

Skeletal fragility can affect people of all ages, whether it be young military recruits at risk for stress fractures, astronauts at risk for bone loss in space or adults at risk for osteoporotic fractures due to weakening of bones with…

Novel Research in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Shows That Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Prevent Osteoporotic Fractures

A first-of-its-kind study published in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry journal has found that low vitamin D levels alone do not cause osteoporotic fractures. This research could resolve the longstanding debate over whether vitamin D supplements prevent these fractures, and indicates that members of the general population should not rely on vitamin D by itself for this purpose.

Broken bone location can have significant impact on long-term health

In older individuals, the location of a broken bone can have significant impacts on long-term health outcomes, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Artificial intelligence improves X-ray identification of patients with broken bones

Artificial intelligence that can “read” electronic radiology reports and flag patients with broken bones who are at risk of osteoporosis outperformed the traditional manual method of health care professionals reading X-ray reports, a new study finds. The results were accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Acid Reflux Drugs Linked to Increased Fracture Risk in Kids

Proton pump inhibitors – a widely used class of drugs used to treat acid reflux and related symptoms – may lead to an increased risk of fractures in children and adolescents, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN). Official journal of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, JPGN is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Vitamin D Boosts Chances of Walking After Hip Fracture

Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that vitamin D deficiency could limit mobility in older adults, said senior author Sue Shapses, a professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.