Endocrine Society calls on Congress to pass legislation to lower the price of insulin

The Endocrine Society is calling on Congress to pass legislation to lower the price of insulin and applauds the efforts of Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone Jr. (D-NJ), Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard E. Neal (D-MA), and Education and Labor Committee Chairman Robert C. “Bobby” Scott (D-VA) to reintroduce H.R. 3, the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act to improve access to affordable medications. In January, the Society published a position statement on insulin access and affordability, which recommends policymakers include government negotiation as part of an overall strategy to reduce insulin prices.

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Once-A-Week Insulin Treatment Could Be Game-Changing For Patients With Diabetes

DALLAS – April 19, 2021 – Treating people with Type 2 diabetes with a new once-a-week injectable insulin therapy proved to be safe and as effective as daily insulin injections, according to the results of two international clinical trials published online today in Diabetes Care. The studies suggest that the once-weekly treatment could provide a convenient alternative to the burden of daily insulin shots for diabetes patients.

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Weekly insulin helps patients with type 2 diabetes achieve similar blood sugar control to daily insulin

A new once-weekly basal insulin injection demonstrated similar efficacy and safety and a lower rate of low blood sugar episodes compared with a daily basal insulin, according to a phase 2 clinical trial. The study results, which will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, compared an investigational drug called basal insulin Fc (BIF) with insulin degludec, a commercially available long-lasting daily insulin, in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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Raising Awareness During Diabetes Awareness Month – Adult and Pediatric Diabetes Experts Available

More than 34 million people in the U.S, or 10.5% of the population, have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And as many as 7 million more Americans have the disease and don’t know it. Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the country..

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Breastfeeding’s Legacy May Protect Against Diabetes

DALLAS – Aug. 25, 2020 – Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published in this month’s print issue of Diabetes, could explain how different tissues cooperate to start and maintain lactation and offer strategies to help improve breastfeeding success for mothers who have insufficient milk production.

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Researchers discover sex-specific differences in neural mechanisms for glucose regulation

Researchers from Tufts have discovered neural mechanisms in mice specific to females that switch estrogen from playing a protective role in glucose metabolism to a disruptive role. The discovery could provide clues to the increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes among post-menopausal women.

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Gene in Fat Plays Key Role in Insulin Resistance

DALLAS – July 23, 2020 – Deleting a key gene in mice in just their fat made tissues throughout these animals insulin resistant, in addition to other effects, a new study by UT Southwestern researchers shows. The findings, reported in a recent issue of PNAS, could shed light on Type 2 diabetes and other insulin resistance disorders, which remain poorly understood despite decades of study.

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Sea Snail, Human Insulin Hybrid Could Lead to Better Diabetes Treatments Sea Snail, Human Insulin Hybrid Could Lead to Better Diabetes Treatments Sea Snail, Human Insulin Hybrid Could Lead to Better Diabetes Treatments Sea Snail, Human Insul

Nearly a century after insulin was discovered, an international team of researchers including University of Utah Health scientists report that they have developed the world’s smallest, fully functional version of the hormone, one that combines the potency of human insulin with the fast-acting potential of a venom insulin produced by predatory cone snails. The finding, based on animal studies, could jumpstart the development of insulin treatments capable of improving the lives of those with diabetes.

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Diabetes reversed in mice with genetically edited stem cells derived from patients

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have used induced pluripotent stem cells produced from the skin of a patient with a rare, genetic form of insulin-dependent diabetes, transformed the stem cells into insulin-producing cells, used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to correct a defect that caused a form of diabetes, and implanted the cells into mice to reverse diabetes in the animals.

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Wearable delivery device allows patients with type 2 diabetes to safely use more affordable insulin option

Adults with type 2 diabetes requiring insulin therapy can safely achieve good blood sugar control using regular human insulin (RHI) in a wearable, patch-like insulin delivery device called V-Go®, a new study finds. Results of the randomized controlled study—which was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society—suggest “a more affordable option” for insulin therapy than newer insulin types, the researchers said.

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Diabetes care reaches new heights as drone delivers insulin for patient

The international medical team that accomplished the world’s first documented drone delivery of insulin for a patient living in a remote community described the project in an ENDO 2020 abstract that will be published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

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High cost of insulin has life-or-death implications for diabetic patients

The most commonly used forms of insulin cost 10 times more in the U.S. than in any other developed country, according to a commentary in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. This prohibitive cost is causing some U.S. patients with Type 1 diabetes to ration the amount of insulin they use, with life-threatening implications.

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Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor

The biological actions of insulin are mediated by its receptor—the insulin receptor—which is localized on the cell surface. In a new study, researchers from Germany, Canada, and Finland show how insulin interacts with its receptor at a second binding site. The scientists hope that these new details concerning insulin–receptor interactions will ultimately expand the current models of insulin binding to its receptor and pave the way towards new approaches to structure-based drug design.

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Researchers engineer insulin-producing cells activated by light for diabetes

Researchers have transplanted engineered pancreatic beta cells into diabetic mice, then caused the cells to produce more than two to three times the typical level of insulin by exposing them to light. The light-switchable cells are designed to compensate for the lower insulin production or reduced insulin response found in diabetic individuals.

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Artificial Pancreas System Better Controls Blood Glucose Levels than Current Technology

Study based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other centers finds new system has safety, efficacy benefits for people with type 1 diabetes

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