Pancreatic cancer is difficult to treat. Nano-drugs hitching a ride on bacteria could help.

Many pancreatic tumors are like malignant fortresses, surrounded by a dense matrix of collagen and other tissue that shields them from immune cells and immunotherapies that have been effective in treating other cancers. Employing bacteria to infiltrate that cancerous fortification and deliver these drugs could aid treatment for pancreatic cancer, according to newly published findings from a team of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers.

Could the liver hold the key to better cancer treatments?

Liver inflammation, a common side-effect of cancers elsewhere in the body, has long been associated with worse cancer outcomes and more recently associated with poor response to immunotherapy. Now, a team led by researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found a big reason why.

New Findings in JNCCN Illustrate Pathway for Screening High-Risk Individuals for Pancreatic Cancer in PRECEDE Study

New research in the April 2024 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network showcases the feasibility of improving early detection and prevention for pancreatic cancer.

Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Lee Peng as Chief of Gastroenterology

Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center welcomed Lee F. Peng, M.D., PhD, as section chief of gastroenterology, department of medicine.

NCCN Updates Treatment Recommendations for Breast, Colorectal, Lung, and other Cancer Types Based on Emerging Evidence

Recent NCCN Guidelines updates—along with the supporting evidence—will be presented during the NCCN 2024 Annual Conference held in Orlando, Florida April 5-7, and simultaneously online. Visit NCCN.org/conference to learn more and register.

Age-Related Changes in Fibroblast Cells Promote Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Spread

Older people may be at greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer and have poorer prognoses because of age-related changes in cells in the pancreas called fibroblasts, according to research led by investigators from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Expert from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey available for comment on FDA approval for NALIRIFOX: a new first-line treatment for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer

On February 13, 2024, the Food and Drug Administration approved NALIRIFOX, a combonation chemotherapy, for the first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patrick Boland, MD, is a medical oncologist in the Gastrointestinal Oncology Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New…

MD Anderson Research Highlights for October 25, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

Recent developments at MD Anderson include positive results from a Phase I trial for patients with TP53-mutant acute myeloid leukemia, a novel machine learning platform to identify cancer biomarkers from liquid biopsies, a tumor-specific multi-microRNA delivery system to improve treatment outcomes in glioblastoma, a combination strategy to overcome treatment resistance in KRAS-mutated pancreatic cancer, and a new target for improving treatment response in patients with stomach cancer that has metastasized to the peritoneal cavity.

A Cancer Survival Calculator Is Being Developed Using Artificial Intelligence

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI)–based tool for estimating a newly diagnosed cancer patient’s chances for surviving long term, according to a study presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2023.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for October 4, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back. Recent developments at MD Anderson include a computer game that helps breast cancer survivors improve symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, a publicly available single-cell atlas of CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, new targets for TP53-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a preclinical target for preventing chemobrain, a blood test to help identify patients at higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and genomic insights to predict the risk of outcomes in patients with bone cancer.

Mayo Clinic’s AI innovation inspires hope in early detection of pancreatic cancer

Estimated to become the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. by 2030, pancreatic cancer has a grim prognosis with nearly 70% of patients facing mortality within the first year of diagnosis. Unfortunately, 40% of small pancreatic cancers elude detection on CT scans until they’ve advanced to an incurable stage.

Pancreatic cancer research in vaccines, immune-based therapies and KRAS inhibition funded by The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN), a leading non-profit in the fight against pancreatic cancer, has awarded Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers William Freed-Pastor, MD, PhD, and Julien Dilly, MS, research grants of $250,000 and $150,000, respectively over a 2-year period, to support their crucial work in the field of pancreatic cancer research.

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Tip Sheet – August 2023

New research shows blood cancers are often misdiagnosed, an NCI grant to develop a urine test for prostate cancer, a surgeon-scientist receives Sylvester’s first DoD grant to study pancreatic cancer, bolstering emergency preparedness for climate-driven disasters, and more are included in this month’s tip sheet .

MD Anderson Research Highlights for August 2, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

Recent developments include a novel biomarker that may predict the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer precursors, insights into the structure and function of a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, a new approach to overcoming treatment resistance in ovarian cancer, distinguishing features of young-onset rectal cancer, a biomarker and potential target for metastatic lung cancer, machine learning models to better predict outcomes of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and a promising therapy for patients with relapsed/refractory MCL.

Staging pancreatic cancer early with minimally invasive surgery shows positive results in patient prognosis, Mayo Clinic study finds

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons reveals that performing a minor surgical procedure on patients newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer helps to identify cancer spread early and determine the stage of cancer.

UTHealth Houston study on repeated radiofrequency ablation in combination with chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer supported with $3.3M HHS grant

A combination strategy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA) with chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer will be studied at UTHealth Houston through a $3.3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Cedars-Sinai Cancer Experts To Present Clinical Findings at AACR Conference

Cedars-Sinai Cancer oncologists and researchers are available to comment on late-breaking topics and research throughout the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2023, happening April 14-19 in Orlando.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for March 8, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

AI improving digestive cancer diagnosis, but data-sharing obstacles remain

Artificial intelligence is helping to deliver earlier and better diagnoses of digestive cancers, but many challenges remain to widespread clinical application, not least limited sharing of medical imaging data between hospitals, and lack of standardization of protocols for medical imaging for AI, a group of researchers has concluded after a comprehensive survey of recent applications of the technology to these most deadly of cancers.

Study discovers triple immunotherapy combination as possible treatment for pancreatic cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a novel immunotherapy combination, targeting checkpoints in both T cells and myeloid suppressor cells, that successfully reprogrammed the tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) and significantly improved anti-tumor responses in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer.

Sotorasib shows clinically meaningful activity in KRAS G12C-mutated advanced pancreatic cancer

In the Phase I/II CodeBreaK 100 trial, the KRAS G12C inhibitor sotorasib achieved meaningful anticancer activity with an acceptable safety profile in heavily pretreated patients with KRAS G12C-mutated metastatic pancreatic cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Injectable, radioactive gel synergizes with chemotherapy to shrink pancreatic tumors

NIBIB-funded researchers are developing a new method to treat pancreatic cancer. In their study, they combined an injectable radioactive gel with systemic chemotherapy in multiple mouse models of the disease. The treatment resulted in tumor regression in all evaluated models, an unprecedented result for this genetically diverse and aggressive type of cancer.

Study Shows Promising Safety, Patient Outcomes Data for MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy to Treat Pancreatic Cancer

Findings from a recent prospective study show promising safety and patient outcomes data for locally advanced and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treatment using ablative Stereotactic MRI-Guided On-table Adaptive Radiation Therapy, also known as SMART.

Advances in treating pancreatic cancer mean options and hope

A diagnosis of cancer may feel devastating. And pancreatic cancer is the least survivable cancer of all known cancers. That’s because when it is diagnosed, it often has already spread. Mark Truty, M.D., a surgical oncologist at Mayo Clinic, says the stigma around the diagnosis can leave people feeling hopeless. He wants people with pancreatic cancer to know that advances in treatment mean more options are available than ever before.