Study Shows Promising Safety, Patient Outcomes Data for MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy to Treat Pancreatic Cancer

Findings from a recent prospective study show promising safety and patient outcomes data for locally advanced and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treatment using ablative Stereotactic MRI-Guided On-table Adaptive Radiation Therapy, also known as SMART.

Advances in treating pancreatic cancer mean options and hope

A diagnosis of cancer may feel devastating. And pancreatic cancer is the least survivable cancer of all known cancers. That’s because when it is diagnosed, it often has already spread. Mark Truty, M.D., a surgical oncologist at Mayo Clinic, says the stigma around the diagnosis can leave people feeling hopeless. He wants people with pancreatic cancer to know that advances in treatment mean more options are available than ever before.

New Study in JNCCN Suggests Way to Predict Outcomes with High Accuracy Prior to Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer Patients

New research in the September 2022 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds the use of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer adds significant prognostic benefit in objectively assessing neoadjuvant chemotherapy response in borderline resectable/locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients prior to surgery.

UCSF-Led Research Team Reveals Mechanisms at Work in Progression of Pancreatic Cysts to Cancer

A UC San Francisco-led team of international researchers has outlined the comprehensive immune landscape and microbiome of pancreatic cysts as they progress from benign cysts to pancreatic cancer. Their findings, publishing August 31 in Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology, could reveal the mechanism of neoplastic progression and provide targets for immunotherapy to inhibit progression or treat invasive disease.

Henry Ford Health + MSU Health Sciences Funds Five Cancer Research Grants to Advance Cancer Medicine, Combat Health Disparities

Henry Ford Health + Michigan State University Health Sciences today announced its funding of five cancer research grants of up to $100,000 each. These five grants follow an initial wave of funding from the partnership, in which 18 pilot grants of up to $25,000 each were funded in May 2022.

Study offers insights into how pancreatic cancer develops

A detailed analysis of pancreatic cancer by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has revealed details of two key transition points in the development of these tumors — the shift from normal cells to precancerous cells, and the change from precancerous to cancerous cells. Understanding these transitions will help lead to the development of novel therapies.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for July 27, 2022

Clinical advances include treating hematologic cancers with effective targeted therapies, circulating tumor DNA as a biomarker for recurrence with colorectal liver metastases, and using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to guide surgical decisions for patients with lateral pelvic lymph node metastases in rectal cancer. Laboratory findings offer new understanding of the pancreatic cancer immune microenvironment, melanoma cell states, TP53 mutation status in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and potential targets for metastatic prostate cancer and GNAS-mutant colorectal cancer.

Preoperative combination chemotherapy improved survival in patients with pancreatic cancer

In a study of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, combination chemotherapy with modified FOLFIRINOX before surgery increased survival relative to historical data and compared favorably to FOLFIRINOX plus hypofractionated radiotherapy, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center published today in JAMA Oncology.

Existing Cancer Therapy in Narrow Use Shows Significant Activity against Other Cancers

A drug currently used in just 1% of cancers has significant potential against the remaining 99%, according to a new study from UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, published in the prestigious journal Nature Cancer. Ivosidenib, or AG-120, is currently used against cancers that have a mutation in the IDH1 gene. However, study results show that Ivosidenib is also effective against unmutated, or “wild-type” IDH1. The protein coded by the IDH1 gene in cancers helps cancer cells survive in a stressful tumor environment, so any inhibitor medication that could weaken this defense mechanism is considered a promising therapy. UH and CWRU scientists discovered that under conditions present in the tumor microenvironment, drugs previously believed to be selective for the mutant enzyme have activity against the normal protein. Specifically, low glucose and magnesium levels enhance drug activity. The team has now tested Ivosidenib in mouse models of pancreatic, colorectal, o

Roswell Park Researchers Identify Molecular ‘Glue’ That Sticks to and Degrades a Cancer-Causing Protein

A small molecule discovered and developed by a team of scientists led by Fengzhi Li, PhD, Associate Professor of Oncology in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, eliminates human pancreatic and colorectal tumor cells by binding to and degrading DDX5, a powerful cancer-causing protein.

Henry Ford Health is First in the World to Offer Latest Advancement in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

Henry Ford Health is the first in the world to complete a full course of patient treatments using the latest advancement in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiation therapy, which integrates real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and linear acceleration to deliver precise and accurate radiation treatment more rapidly than ever before.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 1, 2022

Current advances include new biomarkers to predict chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy outcomes and neurotoxicities, novel treatment targets for pre-cancerous pancreatic lesions and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a new approach to improve immunotherapy responses in cold tumors, a profile of synthetic lethal targets for cancers with tumor suppressor loss, and promising clinical data for acute myeloid leukemia and cancers of unknown primary.

Cedars-Sinai Cancer Experts Present Breakthroughs at 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting

Experts from Cedars-Sinai Cancer, ranked among the top 10 in the nation for cancer care, will present novel research and clinical advances throughout the 2022 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), taking place in person and virtually June 3-7 in Chicago.

Breaking the shield that protects pancreatic cancer from immunotherapy

Scar-like cells that make up a sizable portion of malignant pancreatic tumors and shield these cancers from immune attack are derived from mesothelial cells that line tissues and organs, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, published in Cancer Cell, could offer a new strategy to fight pancreatic cancer, a deadly disease for which no truly effective treatments exist.

April Research Highlights

This tipsheet highlights the latest medical discoveries and faculty news at Cedars-Sinai. Links to full news releases are included with each item.

AI May Detect Earliest Signs of Pancreatic Cancer

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by Cedars-Sinai investigators accurately predicted who would develop pancreatic cancer based on what their CT scan images looked like years prior to being diagnosed with the disease. The findings, which may help prevent death through early detection of one of the most challenging cancers to treat, are published in the journal Cancer Biomarkers.

Pancreatic Cysts, Cancer and Awareness: Answers from an Expert

Russell Langan, MD, surgical oncologist at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, chief of Surgical Oncology and Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery at Saint Barnabas Medical Center (SBMC) and assistant professor of surgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, shares more information on monitoring pancreatic cysts and pancreatic cancer.

New Clinical Advances in Gastroenterology Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 86th Annual Scientific Meeting

Featured science includes increased incidence of pancreatic cancer among young women, quality of life improvements in IBD, colorectal cancer risk from weight loss surgery and medications, and more

MD Anderson Research Highlights for September 22, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a new method to measure breast cancer response, a new immunotherapy approach for multiple myeloma, characterization of the immune landscape of cholangiocarcinoma, a new contrast agent to improve molecular imaging techniques, and new treatment targets in breast, gynecologic and pancreatic cancers.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for August 11, 2021

Current advances include insights into anti-tumor responses, a targeted therapy combination for biliary tract cancers, biomarkers that may predict response to DNA damage repair inhibitors, a “virtual biopsy” using artificial intelligence to characterize tumors, new targeted and immunotherapy approaches for pancreatic cancer, understanding the impact of TP53 mutations on acute myeloid leukemia treatments, as well as a new strategy to overcome treatment-resistant KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 30, 2021

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include expanded use of a targeted therapy for a new group of patients with leukemia, molecular studies yielding novel cancer therapeutic targets, insights into radiation therapy resistance and a community intervention to reduce cervical cancer rates.

Turning a pancreatic cancer cell’s addiction into a death sentence

Probing the unique biology of human pancreatic cancer cells in a laboratory has yielded unexpected insights of a weakness that can be used against the cells to kill them.

Led by Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Scientist Dr. Marianne Koritzinsky, researchers showed that about half of patient-derived pancreatic cancer cell lines are highly dependent or “addicted” to the protein peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4), as a result of the altered metabolic state of the cancer cell. This addiction, which is vital for the cancer cell’s survival, makes it a precise, potential target against the cancer.

Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author 5 Studies, Presented at American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting

Atlantic Health System Cancer Care physicians are co-authors of five original studies presented at this year’s AACR Annual Meeting, held virtually April 10-15 and May 17-21. The AACR meeting is one of the world’s premier scientific gatherings of cancer specialists and researchers.

MD Anderson and Mirati Therapeutics announce KRAS strategic research and development collaboration in solid tumors

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced a strategic research and development collaboration to expand the evaluation of Mirati’s two investigational small molecule, potent and selective KRAS inhibitors – adagrasib (MRTX849), a G12C inhibitor in clinical development, and MRTX1133, a G12D inhibitor in preclinical development, as monotherapy and in combination with other agents – which target two of the most frequent KRAS mutations in cancer.

New Biomarker May Predict Which Pancreatic Cancer Patients Respond to CD40 Immunotherapy

Inflammation in the blood could serve as a new biomarker to help identify patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who won’t respond to the immune-stimulating drugs known as CD40 agonists, suggests a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania published in JCI Insight.