New HSS Study Finds Hip Replacements on the Rise Among Adolescents Under 21 Years of Age

A growing number of adolescents in the United States are undergoing total hip replacement surgeries, according to new study findings from researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City. The results were presented today at the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) annual meeting in a poster titled “Use of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients Under 21 Years Old: A U.S. Population Analysis” and recently published in The Journal of Arthroplasty.

New commentary paper highlights costs of defects in surgical care and calls for elimination of defects in value

A commentary, published in the Nov. 3 issue of the journal NEJM Catalyst Innovations in Care Delivery, highlights how defects in surgical care could be diminished or eliminated for the benefit of patients and to lower costs in American health care spending.
Using colorectal surgery to provide examples and national estimates of the costs of defects in surgical care, the paper summarizes a holistic approach to eliminating defects in surgical care and offers a framework for centers of excellence for removing them. The paper estimates that defects in colorectal surgery cost the American health care system more than $12 billion. The authors discuss eight areas (or domains) of defects that waste money and/or contribute to lower value in care for colorectal surgery patients.

Comprehensive patient blood management program can reduce use of transfusions, improve patient outcomes

A growing number of hospitals have implemented patient blood management programs to reduce unnecessary blood transfusions and costs. A study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings finds that such a program can not only substantially reduce transfusion use, but also reduce length of hospital stays and in-hospital adverse outcomes.

Breast cancer patients can navigate care at home with a new skills kit

With the exception of skin cancers, breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women. This year more than 330,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed according to the American Cancer Society. The COVID-19 pandemic has further challenged these vulnerable patients as well as the thousands of others currently going through cancer treatment and recovery, making some hesitant to leave their homes for necessary screenings, treatments, and consults.

Lifesaving Trauma Skills Course Quickly and Significantly Sharpens Rarely Used Military Surgeons’ Skills

Military surgeons must maintain a broad set of surgical skills to care for combat-related injuries, but during times of peace, these skills are rarely put to use. However, according to a new JAMA Surgery study, a two-day trauma skills course can significantly improve their proficiency and ensure they are able to continue providing optimal trauma care in combat. The study, “Surgical Skills Training and Assessment of Competency,” was led by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) and published Sept. 15.

Surgery, Buprenorphine, and Patients in Recovery from Opioid Use Disorder

With the reintroduction of powerful narcotic opioids to manage acute pain, surgery can be a make-or-break time for patients in recovery from opioid use disorder (OUD). For those using buprenorphine as part of their recovery process, the stress, anxiety and risk can be amplified if, as is often the case, they are directed to stop using the buprenorphine ahead of their surgery.

Same-day discharge for hip and knee replacement surgery is safe and feasible in high-risk patients, study suggests

Same-day discharge after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) is safe in some patients classified as “high risk” – with no increase in complications or other adverse outcomes, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

UC San Diego Health Launches New Center to Spur Patient-Centered Technologies

From tele-monitoring patients with diabetes to using artificial intelligence to prevent sepsis, the newly launched Center for Health Innovation will seek to develop, test and commercialize technologies that make a real, measurable difference in the lives and wellbeing of patients.

Second Breath: Region’s First Double Lung Transplant for COVID-19 Patient

After more than 50 days on advanced life support, a multi-disciplinary team at UC San Diego Health helps a patient who contracted COVID-19 become a candidate for a successful double lung transplant. The transplant surgery was the first in the region performed on a COVID-19 patient.

Apply today for press credentials to cover the virtual American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2021

The virtual American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2021 will convene October 23-27, offering surgeons and guest clinicians both live and on-demand sessions. The conference will offer the finest in continuing education for surgeons across all specialties and throughout all stages of their careers.

American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation Say Preoperative Testing for COVID-19 is Essential, Regardless of Vaccination

All patients undergoing non-emergency surgeries or procedures should continue to have preoperative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for SARS-CoV-2, irrespective of vaccination status, according to an updated guidance from the American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

Dynamic heart model mimics hemodynamic loads, advances engineered heart tissue technology

Efforts to understand cardiac disease progression and develop therapeutic tissues that can repair the human heart are just a few areas of focus for the Feinberg research group at Carnegie Mellon University. The group’s latest dynamic model, created in partnership…

New Children’s Surgery Verification Program standards emphasize patient care expectations

CHICAGO (July 13, 2021): The American College of Surgeons (ACS) Children’s Surgery Verification (CSV) program has announced the recent release of the second version of its Optimal Resources for Children’s Surgical Care manual. The updated standards are intended to ensure programs can achieve a high level of continuous quality improvement for children’s surgery patients from when they first enter a hospital setting until they are discharged. An informational session on the new standards will be presented tomorrow at the 2021 ACS Quality and Safety Conference – VIRTUAL.

Survival for babies born with a birth defect – a “post-code lottery”

Survival for a baby born with a birth defect – otherwise known as a congenital anomaly – is a “post-code lottery”, according to scientists from 74 countries. A study published today in The Lancet , led by researchers from King’s…