Many Mothers May Have Delayed or Abandoned Plans for Additional Children Because of COVID-19 Pandemic

Nearly half of New York City mothers who had been trying to become pregnant again before the coronavirus pandemic began stopped in the first few months of the outbreak, a new study shows.

“EXPERIENCED” MOUSE MOTHERS TUTOR OTHER FEMALES TO PARENT, HELPED BY HORMONE OXYTOCIN

Watching a mother mouse gather her pups into the family’s nest trains other female mice without pups to perform the same parenting task, a new study shows. Furthermore, these observations lead to the production of oxytocin in the brains of virgin female mice, biochemically shaping their maternal behaviors even before they have pups of their own.

NYU Langone Health Named Coordinating Center for American Heart Association Health Equity Research Network to Prevent Hypertension in Black Communities

As part of a $20 million award from the America Heart Association, NYU Grossman School of Medicine has been named as the coordinating center for a new collaboration between eight universities to prevent hypertension and reduce racial inequities in cardiovascular disease outcomes in Black communities.

Study Sheds Light on Persistent Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer Care in the United States

Black men most likely to benefit from advanced prostate cancer therapies are 11 percent less likely to get them than non-Black men. This happens despite apparent equal opportunities in obtaining health care services, a new study in American veterans shows.

Pre-COVID Subway Air Polluted from DC to Boston, But New York Region’s Is the Worst, Study Finds

New York City’s transit system exposes riders to more inhaled pollutants than any other metropolitan subway system in the Northeastern United States, a new study finds. Yet even its “cleaner” neighbors struggle with enough toxins to give health-conscious travelers pause.

Schizophrenia Second Only To Age as Greatest Risk Factor for COVID-19 Death

People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows. Their higher risk, the investigators say, cannot be explained by other factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, and smoking.

New Study Finds Once Hospitalized, Black Patients with COVID-19 Have Lower Risk of Death than White Patients

A team of investigators at NYU Langone Health has found that once hospitalized, Black patients (after controlling for other serious health conditions and neighborhood income) were less likely to have severe illness, die, or be discharged to hospice compared to White patients.

New York City’s Coronavirus Outbreak Spread from More European Sources Than First Reported

The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. A new analysis also shows that most of the spread was within the community, as opposed to coming from people who had traveled.

COVID-19 Frequently Causes Neurological Injuries

Without directly invading the brain or nerves, the virus responsible for COVID-19 causes potentially damaging neurological injuries in about one in seven infected, a new study shows. These injuries range from temporary confusion due to low body-oxygen levels, to stroke and seizures in the most serious cases, say the study authors.

New Study Finds Racial Disparities in COVID-19-related Deaths Exist Beyond Income Differences in 10 Large U.S. Cities

New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major U.S. cities. The researchers found that non-white counties had higher cumulative incidences and deaths compared to predominantly white counties—and this was true for both low-income and high-income communities.

As Evidence of “Hormone Disruptor” Chemical Threats Grows, Experts Call for Stricter Regulation

A growing number of chemicals in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics have been linked to widespread health problems including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development, a set of reviews of hundreds of studies concludes.

New COVID Local Risk Index Helps Cities Identify Neighborhoods at Highest Risk for COVID and Better Target Resources to Blunt Local Pandemic Impact

A new city-oriented COVID Local Risk Index will help municipal leaders identify cities and neighborhoods with populations at higher risk of COVID-19 infection and more severe COVID-19 illness by incorporating key risk factors of race and ethnicity, age, household crowding, poverty and underlying health conditions like diabetes and obesity.

NYU Langone Among First to Enroll Patients In Clinical Trial for COVID-19 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

The first patients were treated as part of a clinical trial testing whether an antibody therapy can safely reduce COVID-19 disease severity. The experimental treatment consists of identical copies of an antibody, a blood protein related to those that occur naturally as part of the human immune system, researchers say.

Health System in Pandemic Epicenter Identifies Outcomes and New Risk Factors of Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19

A team of investigators at NYU Langone Health determined that just over half of 5,279 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 were hospitalized — and nearly a quarter of those hospitalized died or were discharged to hospice, including 60 percent who required ventilators.