Study Sheds Light on Persistent Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer Care in the United States

Black men most likely to benefit from advanced prostate cancer therapies are 11 percent less likely to get them than non-Black men. This happens despite apparent equal opportunities in obtaining health care services, a new study in American veterans shows.

During pandemic, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for non-COVID conditions fell more among whites

New research suggests that the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing racial health care disparities and that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than whites to outpatient care that could have helped prevent deterioration of their non–COVID-19 health conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Quest Diagnostics collaborate to identify the prevalence of COVID-19 in individuals with precursor to multiple myeloma

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, one of the world’s leading centers of cancer research and treatment, and Quest Diagnostics, (NYSE: DGX), the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services, announced the start of a new research study that provides free COVID-19 antibody testing to individuals who are at high risk of developing multiple myeloma.

$5 million NIH grant awarded to reduce COVID-19-related disparities in vulnerable populations

To help reduce COVID-19-related health disparities in vulnerable populations in Texas, a multi-institutional team of researchers led by UTHealth in Houston will identify disease hotspots and testing deserts in racially diverse areas, and then develop and evaluate intervention strategies to increase testing.

Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline

The extent of discriminatory treatment Black adults and children experience at every point of contact within the legal system and the biases that result in Black children’s behavior being managed more harshly in school are detailed in two new analyses from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic’s heavy toll on African American mental health

ANN ARBOR—Black communities in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the number of coronavirus cases and deaths. At the same time, white nationalist activities have increased in the last months.Riana Elyse AndersonRiana Anderson, assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, discusses how these trends are affecting the mental health of African Americans.