Juneteenth Explained: ‘History Doesn’t Repeat Itself; People Do’

Today, Juneteenth — which celebrates the abolition of slavery — coincides with protests across the U.S. against racial injustice. Society has become inspired to renew their interest in African American history — a legacy filled with tragedy, inequality, resilience and survival. In a Q&A session, UK’s Vanessa Holden shares her expertise and insight on the holiday.

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Place doesn’t trump race as predictor of incarceration

Steven Alvarado is the author of “The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,” published June 1 in the journal Socius, a study showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn’t diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos.

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Experts available to comment on racial and social inequality in COVID-19 health care

As all 50 U.S. states ease economic restrictions implemented in response to the coronavirus, health and policy experts are braced for a potential second wave of COVID-19. Based on the first phase of the crisis, the hardest-hit populations are anticipated among communities of color, which have been disproportionally affected. According to a recent report from American Public Media Research Lab, African Americans are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 as Latino or Asian Americans, and nearly 2 1/2 times as likely as whites. Indiana University experts on racial inequality, social inequality in health care and demographics data are available to comment on these topics.

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UIC report examines black population loss in Chicago

A mix of factors is involved in Chicago’s declining black population and others aren’t well defined, but inequality stands out as a leading element, according to a new report from the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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