People with well-controlled, long-duration type 1 diabetes may still face high risk of heart disease

People who have had type 1 diabetes for more than 50 years without kidney complications may still be at substantial risk for heart disease, despite excellent control of blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, according to a study presented Saturday at ENDO 2024, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Boston, Mass.

Resistant Starch Could Help Combat Leading Cause of End-stage Kidney Failure

Combining a low dose of blood pressure medication with a higher intake of dietary-resistant starch might help stave off diabetic kidney disease, according to results from a new animal study. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiology Summit.

Shifting focus: Investigators describe changes to pancreatic β cell at onset of Type 1 Diabetes

About eight million people live with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) worldwide, a chronic autoimmune condition in which the body attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing β-cells (pronounced “beta”) in the pancreas, leading to a lack of insulin and inability to regulate blood sugar. It’s not known why the body suddenly perceives its own β-cells as the enemy; some lines of evidence suggest environmental factors such as viral infections may trigger the onset of T1D, others suggest genetics may also play some role.

Groundbreaking research by investigators at Joslin Diabetes Center sheds new light on the specific changes β-cells go through at the onset of T1D. Their findings—published in Nature Cell Biology—offer new avenues for targeted interventions for the chronic autoimmune condition.

VUMC receives $28 million to lead national study of COVID-diabetes link

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have received a four-year, $28 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, to study the relationship between COVID-19 and diabetes.

CGM alarms often not set to alert children with diabetes to harmful blood glucose fluctuations

Children and teenagers who use continuous glucose monitors (CGM) to manage diabetes often fail to use the appropriate alarm settings to alert to dangerously low or harmful high blood sugar levels, according to a study being presented Thursday at ENDO 2023, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. This variability makes the monitors less useful in tracking glucose levels.

Overweight and obesity prevalent and poorly managed among adults with type 1 diabetes

A brief research report found adults with type 1 diabetes had overweight or obesity at the same rates as adults without diabetes, but only half of these patients received lifestyle recommendations from providers or engaged in lifestyle modification for weight management. The report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Language of Care: University of Utah Health Researchers Co-Design Health Care With the Deaf Community

Navigating health care is hard enough when English is your first language—imagine the difficulty when American Sign is your first language. How can we bridge the linguistic and cultural gaps needed to better care for patients? University of Utah Health is proud to present Language of Care, an incredible short film of how a community of Deaf patients are breaking barriers by co-designing their own care with U of U Health researchers.

Parkinson’s medication improved blood pressure in teens with Type 1 diabetes

Teens with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) who took bromocriptine, a medication used to treat Parkinson’s disease and Type 2 diabetes, had lower blood pressure and less stiff arteries after one month of treatment compared to those who did not take the medicine, according to a small study published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

New Startup Develops Potential Cure for Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin injections to treat Type 1 diabetes could become a thing of the past, but finding the cure faces many challenges. Although transplanting insulin-producing cells represents a promising approach, this cell therapy requires immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Georgia Tech researchers have developed a new biomaterial called iTOL-100 that could cure Type 1 diabetes by inducing immune acceptance of curative transplanted cells without immunosuppression.

Researchers develop pancreatic beta-cell restoring therapy for treating type 1 diabetes

Researchers have successfully treated type 1 diabetes in mice using pancreatic beta-cell, target-specific, chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) regulatory T cells (Tregs), and demonstrated the feasibility of their approach to treat the human condition according to data being presented Monday, June 13 at ENDO 2022, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Ga.

Childhood obesity increases risk of type 1 diabetes

Being overweight in childhood increases the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in later life, according to the findings of a new study that analysed genetic data on over 400,000 individuals. The study, co-led by researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today in Nature Communications, also provides evidence that being overweight over many years from childhood influences the risk of other diseases including asthma, eczema and hypothyroidism.

Personalized medicine research focuses on Hispanics with diabetes in South Texas

A team of researchers studying genetic data to identify hormone responses in a population of Mexican Americans with prediabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and obesity recently received a $3.5 million grant to fund a five-year study set to begin in late 2021.

Structural Racism and Inequitable Pediatric Diabetes Care

Data show racial disparities in type 1 diabetes treatment and outcomes in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the US. NHB children are less likely to be treated with diabetes technology, have poorer glycemic control and higher rates of diabetes complications and diabetes-related mortality than non-Hispanic white children. There is much to be done to ensure equitable care, but as yet, structural racism has not been a focus.

Experts mark the centennial anniversary of the discovery of insulin by highlighting the critical role adipose tissue has played in understanding insulin’s control of metabolism.

2021 marks 100 years since researchers identified insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood.  Soon after, insulin was shown to be effective in lowering blood glucose in humans with…

High readmission rate found for adults with type 1 diabetes hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis

One in five adults with type 1 diabetes who require in-hospital treatment of the life-threatening condition diabetic ketoacidosis has an unplanned repeat hospital visit within a month and is twice as likely to die during the second hospitalization, a new study finds. The results, which will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, also identified several factors that increased the readmission risk for these patients.

Tubeless automated insulin delivery system improves blood glucose outcomes

People with type 1 diabetes can improve their blood sugar control while reducing time with low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, using Insulet Corporation’s Omnipod 5 Automated Insulin Delivery System compared to their standard insulin therapy. Results from an industry-sponsored study of the latest Omnipod, the first tubeless, wearable insulin pump, will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Children, teens with type 1 diabetes had better glucose control during COVID-19 lockdown

Blood glucose levels improved among children and teens with type 1 diabetes during the first 12 weeks of COVID-19 lockdown in the United Kingdom, according to a study presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Addressing the Impact of Structural Racism on Disparities in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications and adverse outcomes through ongoing poor glycemic control.

Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes

In older people with type 1 diabetes, damage to the retina may be linked to memory problems and other cognitive conditions.BOSTON – (December 31, 2020) – As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes.

Targeting T cell protein could prevent type 1 diabetes, study suggests

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine have identified a new therapeutic target to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. The study, which will be published December 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), reveals that inhibiting a protein called OCA-B protects mice from type 1 diabetes by limiting the activity of immune cells that would otherwise destroy the pancreas’ insulin-producing β cells.

Racial Disparities in Pediatric Diabetes Treatment

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes