NEW ONLINE CURRICULUM EQUIPS NURSES TO LEAD INNOVATION BY OFFERING TRAINING IN DESIGN THINKING

– Nurses make up the largest and most trusted group of health care professionals, work on the front lines of the health care system, and are frequently called on to devise on-the-spot solutions to urgent health care problems, yet most nurses receive little or no training in how to effectively address these design challenges. An online curriculum called Design Thinking for Health (www.designthinkingforhealth.org) being launched today will support creative, action-oriented thinking and methodological problem solving by nursing innovators – including students, bedside nurses, clinical leaders, and researchers – by providing access to Design Thinking techniques with a focus on nursing-relevant issues.

Read more

Fighting the HIV Epidemic

Stigma is an important contributor to the continued HIV epidemic in the United States. While pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a medication that can be taken to prevent HIV infection, previous research has shown that a barrier preventing gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men from using PrEP is fear that partners, family members or community members would believe that those who use PrEP are HIV infected. Less is known, however, about these factors among women.

Read more

Initiating Breastfeeding in Vulnerable Infants

The benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child are well-recognized, including for late preterm infants (LPI). But because LPI do not have fully developed brains, they may experience difficulties latching and/or sustaining a latch on the breast to have milk transfer occur. This means that these infants are at high risk for formula supplementation and/or discontinuation of breastfeeding.

Read more

How to Successfully Recruit Minority Adolescents for STI/HIV Prevention Research

Disparities in rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV between Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino adolescents and their white counterparts are well documented. Culturally and developmentally appropriate efforts targeted to help these youth establish healthy practices to lower their risk of sexually transmitted infections are warranted. However, such interventions present unique challenges in recruiting and retaining research participants.

Read more