Advocating Reimbursement Parity for Nurse Practitioners

The current Medicare reimbursement policy for nurse practitioners (NPs) allows NPs to directly bill Medicare for services that they perform, but they are reimbursed at only 85% of the physician rate. A growing number of states are granting full practice authority to nurse practitioners. Even more states have loosened practice restrictions due to COVID-19. Both of these reasons illustrate why payment parity is essential.

Exploring an Epidemic’s Meaning from the Perspective of Nursing

An article written almost 30 years ago helps frame social constructs around the COVID-19 pandemic. By reviewing the essay, an historian of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) extends that construct to include nurses and patients, delivering a local and personal meaning to the epidemic experience.

Penn Nursing-led Philly Team Awarded $1.4 Million NIH Grant to Expand COVID-19 Outreach

José A. Bauermeister, PhD, and Antonia M. Villarruel, PhD, are leading one of 10 new research teams from across the country that received National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants totaling $14 million to extend the reach of the NIH’s Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities. The Philly CEAL team was awarded $1.4 million from the NIH with additional support from Penn Nursing and The University of Pennsylvania, bringing the total for the alliance to $1.53 million.

EHR Usability Issues Linked to Nurse Burnout and Patient Outcomes

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) has investigated associations between EHR usability and nurse job outcomes (burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intention to leave) and surgical patient outcomes (inpatient mortality and 30-day readmission).

Penn Nursing Dean to Chair National Committee

Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will Chair the second phase of the National Academy of Medicine’s (NAM) Culture of Health Program (CoHP) Advisory Committee, which engages a diverse group of experts/advisors to provide strategic guidance to ensure the CoHP meets its intended aims. Her term runs from 2021 through 2023.

Underwood to be 2021 Penn Nursing Commencement Speaker

US Congresswoman Lauren Underwood, who serves Illinois’ 14th Congressional District, will be the 2021 Penn Nursing commencement speaker. The ceremony, which will be virtual due to the continuing pandemic, will take place on Monday, May 17, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST. Underwood is the first woman, the first person of color, and the first millennial to represent her community in Congress. She is also the youngest African American woman to serve in the United States House of Representatives.

Nurse Work Environment Influences Stroke Outcomes

Stroke remains a leading cause of death worldwide and one of the most common reasons for disability. While a wide variety of factors influence stroke outcomes, data show that avoiding readmissions and long lengths of stay among ischemic stroke patients has benefits for patients and health care systems alike. Although reduced readmission rates among various medical patients have been associated with better nurse work environments, it is unknown how the work environment might influence readmissions and length of stay for ischemic stroke patients.

Return to Work and the Path to Recovery after Serious Injury in Black Men

After a traumatic injury, returning to work (RTW) can be a strong indication of healing and rehabilitation and may play a pivotal role in promoting physical and functional recovery. But how does RTW after a traumatic injury affect mental health recovery, particularly in individuals who experience social and economic marginalization?

Deborah Watkins Bruner, PhD, to Receive the 16th Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

The biennial award honors the best scholarly qualities that Dr. Fagin, the School’s third Dean, exemplified. It is given to a Penn Nursing faculty member, or a graduate from the School’s doctoral program, who has made a distinguished contribution to nursing scholarship. Dr. Bruner will deliver the lecture ‘Inspiration, Innovation and Impact’ virtually during the award presentation on April 15, 2021 from 3-4:30 PM EST.

Re-envisioning the Nursing PhD Degree

The PhD degree prepares nurse scientists to advance knowledge through research that improves health, translates into policy, and enhances education. However, as the role of the nurse has changed, and health care has grown more complex, there is a need to re-envision how PhD programs can attract, retain, and create the nurse-scientists of the future and improve patient care.

For the Sixth Consecutive Year, Penn Nursing is # 1 in the World

Since 2016, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) has been the #1 nursing school in the world. Penn Nursing again retains the top spot for 2021 according to a recent ranking by QS World University. The rankings highlight the world’s top universities in 51 different subject areas based on academic reputation, employer reputation, and research impact.

Equitably Allocating COVID-19 Vaccine

Equitable implementation of COVID‐19 vaccine delivery is a national and global priority, with a strong focus on reducing existing disparities and not creating new disparities. But while a framework has been recognized for equitable allocation of COVID‐19 vaccine that acknowledges the rights and interests of sexual and gender minorities (SGM), it fails to identify strategies or data to achieve that goal.

New York State’s Hospital Nurse Staffing Legislation Predicted to Save Lives and Money

According to a new study published in Medical Care, improving hospital nurse staffing as proposed in pending legislation in New York state would likely save lives. The cost of improving nurse staffing would be offset by savings achieved by reducing hospital readmissions and length of hospital stays.

Promoting and Protecting Human Milk and Breastfeeding During COVID-19

With stressors mounting daily on the health care system due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a de-prioritization of the childbearing family has been noted. Their care has changed, resulting in mothers forced to go through labor and birth without their partners, parents barred from NICU visitation, and discharge of mothers and newborns early without enough expert lactation care. There is great concern that these changes in childbearing families’ care may become permanent – to the detriment of the health of both mother and child.

Addressing Breastfeeding Disparities for African American Mothers

An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the U.S., a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time.

Addressing the Impact of Structural Racism on Disparities in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications and adverse outcomes through ongoing poor glycemic control.

Novel Anti-Craving Mechanism Discovered to Treat Cocaine Relapse

Cocaine continues to be one of the most commonly abused illicit drugs in the United States. Pre-clinical literature suggests that targeting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in the brain may represent a novel approach to treating cocaine use disorder. Specifically, GLP-1R agonists, which are FDA-approved for treating diabetes and obesity, have been shown to reduce voluntary drug taking and seeking in preclinical models of cocaine used disorder. However, the exact neural circuits and cell types that mediate the suppressive effects of GLP-1R agonists on cocaine-seeking behavior are mostly unknown.

Closing the Racial Disparity Gap in Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences.

Home Health Care Improves COVID-19 Outcomes

Survivors of COVID-19 are a vulnerable population who often have health ramifications from their illness and hospital stay. Upon returning home from acute care, large proportions of survivors experience functional dependencies, pain, dyspnea, and exhaustion. Until now, no data has been available on the outcomes of COVID-19 patients discharged home after hospitalization and their recovery needs.

Dean Antonia Villarruel to Receive 2020 Globy Award

The Global Philadelphia Association uses the award to recognize international significant achievements of Philadelphia leaders in medicine and business entrepreneurship. Penn Nursing Dean Antonia Villarruel is one of five recipients to be honored this year during the virtual 2020 Globy Awards celebration on December 14, 2020.

Racial Disparities in Pediatric Diabetes Treatment

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes

How the Pandemic Disrupts Breastfeeding Experiences

The COVID-19 pandemic and the implications of physical distancing have disrupted new mothers’ birth and breastfeeding experiences even if they are not COVID-19 positive or a person awaiting results. In a new case series report from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), researchers share common concerns and experiences as reported by three first-time, healthy mothers regarding the disruption of their birth plans and breastfeeding experiences.

Penn Nursing’s Maria Torchia LoGrippo is a 2020 NLN Academy of Nursing Education Fellow

LoGrippo, PhD, RN, MSN, NE-BC, ANEF, the Kehler Family Assistant Dean of Curricular Affairs and Innovation and Practice Associate Professor in Penn Nursing’s Department of Family & Community Health, is one of fifteen distinguished nurse educators selected for the fourteenth class of fellows to be inducted into the prestigious NLN Academy of Nursing Education. With previous classes, academy membership now totals 317.

Matthew D. McHugh Elected for Membership to the National Academy of Medicine

Matthew D. McHugh, PhD, JD, MPH, RN, FAAN, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Dr. McHugh is the Independence Chair for Nursing Education and Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, and Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics.

Amy Gutmann and Michael Doyle Create Gutmann Leadership Scholars Program at Penn Nursing with $2M Gift

University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann and her husband, Michael Doyle, have a made a $2 million gift to the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Innovating for Life and Living Campaign, as part of the University’s Power of Penn Campaign. The gift, which brings the couple’s total giving to Penn to $4.5 million, will create the Gutmann Leadership Scholars Program at Penn Nursing.

Missouri Foundation for Health Joins National Study on Replication of Penn Nursing’s Transitional Care Model

The Missouri Foundation for Health is co-funding the replication and rigorous examination of the outcomes of the Transitional Care Model at the VA St. Louis Health Care System that is part of the national MIRROR-TCM study. Earlier this year, Arnold Ventures awarded a $6 million grant in support of the study at four large health systems, including the Veterans Health Administration.

15-Year Trend Persists in Disparate Insulin Pump Use in Children

Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology.

Can Mobile Technology Offer New Pathways to Improve Recovery For Patients Who Experience Serious Traumatic Injuries?

Serious traumatic injuries are a health event that can begin a trajectory toward chronic health and social challenges. Research on patient outcomes following traumatic injuries establishes the pervasive nature of injuries’ long-term consequences in physical, psychological, social and economic well-being, which may persist months and even years after an injury hospitalization. In light of this research, emerging interventions have targeted enhanced and coordinated healthcare services to support recovery and address patients’ long-term rehabilitative needs.

Preparing Future Clinicians to Intervene in Opioid Crisis

Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels around the world. In the United States, remediation of pain is one of the most common reasons American adults seek healthcare. Therefore, it is vital that clinicians practicing in diverse roles and settings have a clinical understanding of pain and substance use disorders as well as knowledge about public health and opioid policy interventions.

State Laws Key to HIV Prevention Efforts

HIV prevention remains a public health priority in the United States. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a drug regimen recommended for individuals who have engaged in behaviors that place them at elevated risk for HIV. When used consistently, daily oral PrEP has been shown to reduce HIV transmission by 99 percent. However, despite increases in PrEP awareness and uptake over the past several years, data show that four of five people who could benefit from PrEP did not access the medication in 2018.

Helping Teens with Type 1 Diabetes Improve Diabetes Control with MyDiaText

Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The challenges of managing multiple doses of daily insulin administration, blood glucose monitoring, dietary and exercise requirements, can make self-care difficult and complicate outcomes. Adolescents with T1DM often have poorer diabetes outcomes than others, indicating that glucose control is difficult for them to maintain.

Wide Variation Across Hospitals in Nurse Staffing Is Threat to Public’s Health

According to a new study published today in BMJ Quality & Safety, many hospitals in New York and Illinois were understaffed right before the first surge of critically ill Covid-19 patients. The study, “Chronic Hospital Nurse Understaffing Meets Covid-19,” documented staffing ratios that varied from 3 to 10 patients for each nurse on general adult medical and surgical units. ICU nurse staffing was better but also varied significantly across hospitals.

Tackling the Bioethics Challenges Raised by COVID-19

The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges. From the allocation of resources and triage protocols to health-care worker and patient rights and the management of clinical trials, new ethical questions have come to the forefront of today’s global public health emergency.

A New Approach to Aiding Black Male Trauma Survivors

Many Black men suffer symptoms of traumatic stress in the aftermath of traumatic injury, and they also often carry social concerns, including experiences of discrimination and stigma. Yet despite their significant needs, underserved populations often have limited access to behavioral health care as well as a lack of financial resources to pay for such care. Because of these barriers, many trauma survivors do not seek professional behavioral health care and instead rely on informal or alternative sources of care.

Palliative Nursing’s Role During COVID-19 and Beyond

As a rapid influx of patients overwhelmed health systems during the coronavirus pandemic, palliative nurses played dual roles supporting patients, patient families, and colleagues. Two researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) are among those detailing the important role palliative care has in responding during the COVID-19 pandemic and in future public health crises.

Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes

As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats—like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus—to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in developing solutions responsive to the unprecedented threats to quality standards of care delivery is required.

Calling for Nursing Support Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

There are close to 28 million nurses around the world who comprise a global workforce that delivers about 90 percent of primary healthcare, including frontline response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ensuring their optimal contribution and continued well-being amid the myriad consequences of COVID-19 will increase the potential for measurable and improved health outcomes.

Responding to Challenges of Older Adults with COVID-19

Older adults with COVID-19 who survive hospitalizations and return to their homes confront substantial health challenges and an unpredictable future. Early evidence suggests that complex and long-term physical, functional, cognitive, and emotional negative health consequences will be the norm for them. However, the trajectories of health care needs of older adults with COVID-19 in the weeks and months following hospital discharge have yet to be identified.