Geographic disparities in access to addiction treatment medication may be linked to race, ethnicity

Buprenorphine, a life-saving medication for opioid use disorder, is far less accessible in geographic areas of the United States with racially and ethnically diverse populations than in predominantly white areas, according to a new study of pre-pandemic data led by health policy scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health published today in Journal of Addiction Medicine.

BIPOC individuals bear greater post-COVID health burdens, new research suggests

Black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) who were infected with COVID-19 experienced greater negative aftereffects in health and work loss than did similarly infected white participants, new research finds.

Expert Analysis: Black Americans Have Highest Cancer Mortality Rates In The United States

For Black History Month, Hackensack Meridian Health offers experts on some of the reasons behind higher cancer rates in the Black community and how to reverse the trends.

Study Uncovers Barriers to Mammography Screening Among Black Women

The study finds utilization of annual screening mammograms suboptimal among low-income Black women with several reported perceived and actual barriers. Most had a low breast cancer risk perception. Interestingly, participants perceived mammograms as very beneficial: 80 percent believed that ‘if breast cancer is found early, it’s likely that the cancer can be successfully treated;’ 90 percent indicated that ‘having a mammogram could help find breast cancer when it is first getting started.’

RUSH and UChicago Medicine Expand Racial Health Equity Reporting Tool Nationally

Chicago health systems RUSH and UChicago Medicine are making available a free self-assessment tool that uses a race-conscious approach to help hospitals benchmark health equity efforts for all patients. Created after the COVID 19 pandemic revealed disproportionate racial and ethnic mortality rates, the effort is supported by a Commonwealth Fund grant and was piloted at hospitals across Illinois.

Sylvester Researchers, Collaborators Seek Answers to Prostate, Breast Cancer Among People of African Ancestry

Cancer Disparities: A new African Cancer Genome Registry at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in Miami seeks to find reasons for higher prostate and breast cancer rates in people of African ancestry. Dr. Sophia George, co-principal investigator, is available for interviews, as are two breast and prostate cancer study participants.

Bar-Ilan University study reveals disparity in quality of life among COVID-19 survivors from different ethnic groups

A new study conducted by researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israel has shed light on the long-term impact of COVID-19 on the quality of life among different ethnic groups in the country. The study, part of a larger cohort project, highlights a significant discrepancy between Arabs and Druze, and Jews, with the two former groups experiencing a more pronounced decline in quality of life one year after infection.

UCSF Internal Medicine Specialist to be Celebrated for Diabetes Epidemiology Research

Alka M. Kanaya, MD, UC San Francisco primary care physician and researcher, is being recognized with the 2023 Kelly West Award for Outstanding Achievement in Epidemiology from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The award recognizes significant contributions to the field of diabetes epidemiology.

ASCO23: Sylvester Cancer Experts Available for Interviews on a Wide Range of Topics

In addition to presenting Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center research findings, Sylvester experts are available at ASCO to share perspectives on a wide variety of topics and studies ranging from breast cancer to sarcoma, prostate cancer, mesothelioma, melanoma, CNS tumors and more.

Pride Month: Penn Nursing Experts Available to Discuss LGBTQ+ Issues

Topics Include: Eidos LGBTQ+ Health Initiative, Policy, HIV/AIDS, Sex Communication, Mental Health, Disparities, PrEP, Workplace Inclusion  Experts Available Via Virtual/Phone/Email Interviews The Eidos LGBTQ+ Health Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing cultivates and engages emerging and experienced…

Soutenir les personnes atteintes d’épilepsie aves des outils pour réduire la stigmatisation

La stigmatisation affecte tous les aspects des soins de l’épilepsie, du diagnostic au traitement en passant par la législation et aux allocations budgétaires. Elle affecte la vie des personnes atteintes d’épilepsie lorsqu’elles n’ont pas un accès égal à l’éducation, à l’emploi et aux mêmes droits sociaux.

Asthma, COPD, Health Disparities Research, and Virtual Press Event: ATS 2023

We’re mere days away from the largest gathering of respiratory health professionals! You can still register to cover ATS 2023 in Washington, DC. Before you join us, here are some of the research abstracts that will be presented to this year’s gathering of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine health professionals.

Empowering people with epilepsy to lead the way in reducing stigma

Stigma affects all aspects of epilepsy care. It affects the lives of people with epilepsy when they are not given equal access to education, employment, and social opportunities. In a US study, one-third of respondents identified stigma—not seizures—as the most difficult part of living with epilepsy.

ATS Publishes Official Statement on Race, Ethnicity and Pulmonary Function Test Interpretation

The American Thoracic Society has issued an official statement for clinicians that explains why race and ethnicity should no longer be considered factors in interpreting the results of spirometry, the most commonly used type of pulmonary function test (PFT). The statement was endorsed by the European Respiratory Society. The full statement is available online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

March Tip Sheet From Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

A new study reported in JAMA Network Open unveils disparities in Mesothelioma survival, a grant to help construction workers nail quitting smoking, a new AI algorithm that offers insights into deadly cancer, a newly launched Neuroendocrine Tumors Program, a cancer researcher chosen to co-lead Tumor Biology Program and more are in this month’s tip sheet from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

‘Other’ race/ethnicity linked to higher suicide and overdose risk in military members with mild TBI

Previous studies have reported high rates of death by suicide and drug overdose – including opioid overdose – in military service members with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). A new study finds that those risks are highest among military members with mTBI who identify their racial/ethnic status as “Other,” as opposed to standard racial/ethnic categories, reports the March/April issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

‘Urology on the Beach’ Conference Highlights Advances in Research and Patient Care

From urologic cancers to female urology to male infertility to kidney stones and sexual health, top urologists from throughout the nation shared their insights and practical tips at “Urology on the Beach,” a conference hosted January 13-15 by the Desai Sethi Urology Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Language of Care: University of Utah Health Researchers Co-Design Health Care With the Deaf Community

Navigating health care is hard enough when English is your first language—imagine the difficulty when American Sign is your first language. How can we bridge the linguistic and cultural gaps needed to better care for patients? University of Utah Health is proud to present Language of Care, an incredible short film of how a community of Deaf patients are breaking barriers by co-designing their own care with U of U Health researchers.

Learn CPR and Lower Your Stress: Mount Sinai Cardiologists Emphasize Their Importance During American Heart Month

Doctors warn about lack of knowledge of administering CPR, especially in high-risk groups, and the rise of stress-related heart issues

New Shiley EyeMobile for Children Hits the Road to Serve Underserved Communities

The new UC San Diego Shiley EyeMobile for Children is driving to schools in San Diego County to serve low-income families in need of eye exams. The EyeMobile, a program of UC San Diego Health, will visit approximately 250 preschools to provide vision care to low-income students.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System Receive $5.2 Million NIH Grant to Study Heart Failure in Hispanic Populations

Cardiology researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a five-year, $5.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore the underlying causes of heart failure among Hispanics/Latinos, who are at heightened risk for heart disease. Investigators will take a novel approach to assess risk: by simultaneously evaluating heart function and the relationship between the heart and the aorta, the large artery that conveys oxygen-rich blood from the heart’s left ventricle to the rest of the body.

UC San Diego Health Recognized for Health Equity in Care of Sickle Cell Crisis

UC San Diego Health has been awarded the prestigious 2022 California Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems Quality Leaders Award in the category of health equity.

Addressing Health Inequities Could Help Avert a Neurologic Health Crisis

The closing plenary session at ANA2022 spotlighted neurologic health inequities and presented new research finding that neighborhood disadvantage strongly predicted likelihood of death from neurologic conditions independent of individual wealth and demographics.

Study Finds Persistent Disparities in Access to Prenatal Care Among Pregnant People Based on Citizenship Status and Education Level

Findings suggest exclusions to Medicaid because of immigration status may increase risk for maternal health care disparities in some immigrant populations

Today: ANA2022 Media Roundtable to Spotlight Latest in Neuro Research

As the American Neurological Association’s 147th Annual Meeting wraps up today, October 25, the ANA is holding a Media Roundtable at 11 a.m. U.S. Central for reporters to access the latest developments in neurology and neuroscience.

Substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds report long-term COVID-19 complications

A substantial proportion of ethnically diverse children from low-resource backgrounds with severe COVID-19 illness are reporting long-term complications from the virus, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

An Environmental Wake-Up Call for Neurology

The Presidential Symposium at the American Neurological Association’s 2022 Annual Meeting (ANA2022) in Chicago will shine a spotlight on the role of environmental exposures — air pollution, pesticides, microplastics, and more — in diseases like dementias and developmental disorders.

American Neurological Association Publishes Research Abstracts for ANA2022, Oct. 22–25 in Chicago

Abstracts of breaking research in neurology and neuroscience, to be presented at the 2022 American Neurological Association Annual Meeting Oct. 22-25, are now available in Annals of Neurology and on the ANA2022 website.

Rural health education center in Illinois gets $6.5M

UIC’s College of Medicine Rockford will receive nearly $6.5 million over the next five years to fund the Illinois Area Health Education Centers Network program. The network seeks to address the critical health workforce needs in rural and underserved communities in Illinois by providing access to training and education opportunities.

FAU Awarded $1 Million NIH Grant for Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science

FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine received a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to launch the first Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science in the Southeastern United States – and one of only 10 sites across the nation.

Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation for IBS-C, Infliximab Retreatment for Crohn’s Disease Featured in September Issue of AJG

The September issue of AJG highlights new clinical science, including a potential therapy to improve IBS-C symptoms, reintroduction of infliximab for Crohn’s disease, and population-based data to examine incidence and mortality of certain GI and hepatology diseases.