Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center Researchers Receive Price Family Foundation Health Equity Research Awards

The National Cancer Institute-designated Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center (MECC) has partnered with the Price Family Foundation to fund eight research teams developing novel cancer therapies and improving cancer outcomes for historically marginalized communities in the Bronx.

Exploring Cancer and Health Data on Asian American and Pacific Islanders

Cancer health disparities are often identified from population-based surveillance data routinely captured by statewide cancer registries. Antoinette Stroup, PhD, of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey’s only National Cancer Institute – Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center together with RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers School of Public Health is the director of the New Jersey State Cancer Registry (NJSCR), explores cancer and health data on the Asian American and Pacific Islander population.

Children in Underserved Communities Are at Increased Risk of Being Admitted to the Pediatric ICU and of Dying There; Black Children at Most Risk

Hospitalized children covered by Medicaid who reside in the poorest neighborhoods are at increased risk of being admitted to the hospital’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and of dying while there, according to research published at the ATS 2022 international conference. The researchers also found higher mortality rates among Black children treated in PICUs.

Addressing status epilepticus management in low-resource regions: “Where do we fit in?”

Low-resource areas face multiple challenges to diagnosing and treating long-lasting seizures, or status epilepticus. We talked with neurologists in four countries about how status epilepticus is managed in their areas.

Without Roe v. Wade, millions will travel farther for abortion care

The median distance to a clinic would increase from 40 miles to 113.5 miles. State-level legislation “abortion care deserts” that will disproportionally effect women of color and the impoverished. Large swathes of the country would experience a 100-fold increase in distance to care, particularly in the South, Midwest and Intermountain West.

Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Launch Multi-Million Dollar Joint Initiative to Improve Health and Wellbeing in West and Southwest Philadelphia Neighborhoods with Greenspaces, Career Training, and Community Environmental Grants

The Penn Urban Health Lab, along with 13 community and faith-based organizations, will launch Deeply Rooted, a community-driven program to promote health equity and environmental justice in Black and brown neighborhoods in West and Southwest Philadelphia. Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s (CHOP) Healthier Together Initiativeare the initial funders for Deeply Rooted, while the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society serves as the lead strategic greenspace implementation partner.

CHOP Study Finds Neighborhood Poverty and Crowding Associated with Higher Rates of COVID-19 in Pregnancy

Neighborhood characteristics, including poverty and crowding within homes, were associated with higher rates of SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy during the prevaccination era of the pandemic, according to a new study led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, which were published today in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, may partially explain the high rates of COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, among Black and Hispanic patients.

Lessons from the Tuskegee Experiment, 50 Years After Unethical Study Uncovered

This year marks 50 years since it came to light that the nation’s leading public health agency, the Public Health Service, conceived an unethical “research study” – the Tuskegee Experiment – that lasted for 40 years. The participants? Black men in a rural community in the South who existed in a state of quasi-slavery, making them extremely vulnerable and the agency’s treatment of them that much more sickening.

Einstein Aging Study Receives $32 Million Grant to Study Alzheimer’s Disease

To help address the rising tide of Alzheimer’s disease nationwide, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with faculty at Pennsylvania State University and other institutions, have received a five-year, $32 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support the ongoing Einstein Aging Study (EAS), which focuses on both normal aging and the special challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, and other dementias. EAS was established at Einstein in 1980 and has been continuously funded by the NIH.

What drives racial and ethnic gaps in Medicare’s quality program?

The improvements in care for older adults from the Accountable Care Organization movement haven’t reached all older Americans equally. ACOs that include a higher percentage of patients who are Black, Hispanic, Native American or Asian have lagged behind those with higher percentage of white patients in providing preventive care and keeping patients out of the hospital. Now, a new study shows that some of this inequity stems from how an ACO’s patients get their primary care.

Expert panel explores challenges, presents solutions to improve breast cancer outcomes for Black women

Although awareness and research activity is growing, much work still needs to be done to ensure equity in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Black women, according to an expert panel who spoke earlier this week at the virtual American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2021.

New Clinical Advances in Gastroenterology Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 86th Annual Scientific Meeting

Featured science includes increased incidence of pancreatic cancer among young women, quality of life improvements in IBD, colorectal cancer risk from weight loss surgery and medications, and more

Community Health Center Honored for Services Assisting Minority Women

Florida Atlantic University and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center, operated by FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, together with the West Palm Beach YWCA, recently received the “2021 Community Collaborators Award” from Nonprofits First, Inc., for their untiring efforts to mitigate health care disparities among women from minority groups with limited access to quality care.

Addressing Systemic Inequities Linked to Readmission Disparities for Minority Stroke Patients

Racial minorities are disproportionately affected by stroke, with Black patients experiencing worse post-stroke outcomes than White patients. Racial disparities in stroke outcomes have been linked to suboptimal control of risk factors such as hypertension, lack of access to health care, and decreased utilization of neurologic services. However, it was previously unknown if outcomes for Black ischemic stroke patients were affected by care settings with insufficient nursing resources.

Active Living After Cancer program improves physical functioning of breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer survivors who participated in Active Living After Cancer, an evidence-based 12-week group program, markedly increased their physical activity and ability to accomplish the basic pursuits of daily life, researchers from The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Cancer.

Project to improve health equity in Indianapolis expands with funding from Lilly

Indiana University has received a five-year, $5 million grant from Eli Lilly and Co. to expand the Diabetes Impact Project, which aims to improve health equity in three Indianapolis neighborhoods where residents are predominantly people of color.

UC San Diego School of Medicine Receives $2.6M for Health Equity Programs

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $2.6M to fund their PRIME-Health Equity program and launch a new program on Native American health. These medical education programs provide financial support to medical students interested in addressing health disparities and serving local communities.

2VIDA! Tackles COVID Vaccine Hesitancy and Barriers in Latinx, Black Communities

UC San Diego is collaborating with San Ysidro Health on an NIH-funded outreach program to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Latinx and African American communities. The team runs pop-up vaccination sites across San Diego, and goes door-to-door to homes and local businesses to spread awareness.

Mount Sinai Study Identifies Significant Inequalities Among Low-Risk Births, Finds Higher Rates of Unexpected Complications for Black and Hispanic Infants

Hospital quality of care during delivery is a major factor for racial and ethnic disparities among low-risk newborns

NYU Langone Health Named Coordinating Center for American Heart Association Health Equity Research Network to Prevent Hypertension in Black Communities

As part of a $20 million award from the America Heart Association, NYU Grossman School of Medicine has been named as the coordinating center for a new collaboration between eight universities to prevent hypertension and reduce racial inequities in cardiovascular disease outcomes in Black communities.

Structural Racism and Inequitable Pediatric Diabetes Care

Data show racial disparities in type 1 diabetes treatment and outcomes in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the US. NHB children are less likely to be treated with diabetes technology, have poorer glycemic control and higher rates of diabetes complications and diabetes-related mortality than non-Hispanic white children. There is much to be done to ensure equitable care, but as yet, structural racism has not been a focus.

Study of Cancer Patients and COVID-19 Highlights Health Disparities

Findings from a study led by researchers at Henry Ford Cancer Institute, in collaboration with Advocate Aurora Health, the Food and Drug Administration and Syapse®, show an elevated risk for severe COVID-19 effects or death among patients with cancer, with the highest risk being among low-income and Black patients.

Dr. Chandra Ford – Founding Director, Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, Professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, available as expert on health equity

Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, is available as expert on health equity. Prof. Ford’s expertise includes:…

Only 20 states implemented health equity committees to assist with COVID-19 vaccine distribution planning

A new study out of UChicago found that while 43 states (out of 51, including all 50 states and Washington, D.C.) created a committee to develop a vaccine distribution plan, only 20 plans mentioned using a health equity committee to assist with plan development.

Study on Green Kiwifruit to Treat Chronic Constipation and New ACG Clinical Guidelines on C. difficile Infection Featured in the June Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology

The June issue of AJG includes articles on the effectiveness of OTC therapies and green kiwifruit as a dietary therapy for chronic constipation, as well as new ACG Guidelines on the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of C. difficile infections, and more.

Tip Sheet: Massive unmet needs in COVID-19 treatment, osteoporosis drugs for breast cancer, new bladder cancer target — and AIDS at 40

SEATTLE — June 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. If you are covering news at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 4-8), check out our ASCO page highlighting Fred Hutch presentations and feel free to reach out to our media team for help sourcing experts: [email protected]

Disparities persisted as orthopaedic visits shifted to telemedicine

Like other medical specialties at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, orthopaedic surgery rapidly pivoted from in-person visits to remote appointments via telemedicine. Analysis of that initial experience finds that some groups of patients faced persistent or worsening disparities as the shift to telemedicine occurred, reports Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

4DMedical Teaming with ATS Diversity Fund to Improve Access and Equity in American Health Care

The American Thoracic Society is recognized for its commitment to diversity and inclusion and is respected as a powerful advocate protecting the health of the American people by encouraging increased investment in public health care. During the ATS 2021 International Conference starting May 14, respiratory imaging disruptor 4DMedical is partnering with the ATS to make better health care technologies accessible to those who need it the most.

CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees

The Psychology Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Psychology Research Awards. The recipients are undergraduate students conducting original psychological research, who receive awards of up to $500 per project.

Penn Nursing Dean to Chair National Committee

Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will Chair the second phase of the National Academy of Medicine’s (NAM) Culture of Health Program (CoHP) Advisory Committee, which engages a diverse group of experts/advisors to provide strategic guidance to ensure the CoHP meets its intended aims. Her term runs from 2021 through 2023.

Tip Sheet: New COVID-19 transmission study, returning to school, video of biorepositories — and a new weight loss study

SEATTLE —  April 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. April is National Minority Health Month, with a focus on the disproportionate impacts of COVID-19 on communities of color. See more details below on related Fred Hutch programming.Save the date for our monthly public science event, “Science Says” on Tuesday, April 27.

Study Points to Importance of Crisis Standards of Care for Equitable Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine study, “Assessment of the Disparities Associated With a Crisis Standards of Care Resource Allocation Algorithm for Patients in Two U.S. Hospitals During the COVID-19 Pandemic,” published March 11 in JAMA Network Open, a journal of the American Medical Association.