$2 million grant from The Roe Green Foundation catalyzes multidisciplinary research building in Uganda

For the past 38 years, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and University Hospitals (UH) have worked closely with a variety of institutions in Uganda to advance medical research and education across a range of fields.

Their facilities have remained scattered across the campuses of local partners but now, the collaboration will have a permanent home.

A $2 million gift from The Roe Green Foundation, jointly awarded to CWRU and UH, will advance global health initiatives from each institution and establish a state-of-the-art research hub and gathering place in Uganda’s capital, Kampala: the Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Roe Green Medical Education and Research Building.

Specific gut bacteria increase risk of severe malaria

Researchers have identified multiple species of bacteria that, when present in the gut, are linked to an increased risk of developing severe malaria in humans and mice. Their findings could lead to the development of new approaches targeting gut bacteria to prevent severe malaria and associated deaths.

Mount Sinai Renames Top-Ranked Heart Hospital to Honor Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, and His Legacy of Excellence

“Mount Sinai Fuster Heart Hospital” furthers vision of world-leading cardiac care and research that prevents heart disease worldwide

To Cut Global Emissions, Replace Meat and Milk with Plant-Based Alternatives

Replacing 50% of meat and milk products with plant-based alternatives by 2050 can reduce agriculture and land use related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 31% and halt the degradation of forest and natural land, according to new research in Nature Communications journal.

World can now breathe easier

Global, population-weighted PM2.5 exposure — related to both pollution levels and population size — increased from 1998 to a peak in 2011, then decreased steadily from 2011 to 2019, largely driven by exposure reduction in China and slower growth in other regions, new research shows.

American University Anthropologist and Global Health Expert Available to Comment on Immigration, Immigrant Health

WHAT: As the summer migrant labor season is in full swing in the U.S., health inequities and other social disparities that affect these communities become more visible. Over 3 million people in the U.S. work temporarily or seasonally in farm fields, orchards, canneries, plant nurseries, fish/seafood/meat packing plants, and more.

June Tip Sheet from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

A world-renowned biochemist joins the Sylvester Cancer team, a global health leader strives to ensure more equitable cancer care, a recent study identifies disparities in federal cancer research funding, new targeted therapies for thyroid and other cancers are making surgery a secondary option for many patients, efforts to preserve women’s sexual health while they receive endocrine therapy for breast cancer, and more are highlighted in this month’s tip sheet from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Paenibacillus infection cause of hydrocephalus in Ugandan infants

In a landmark paper, an international team led by Yale School of Medicine’s Dr. Steven Schiff details three linked studies conclusively linking the bacteria Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus to an estimated 4,000 new cases of postinfectious hydrocephalus in Ugandan infants each year. Paenibacillus…

ASCO23: Sylvester Cancer Experts Available for Interviews on a Wide Range of Topics

In addition to presenting Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center research findings, Sylvester experts are available at ASCO to share perspectives on a wide variety of topics and studies ranging from breast cancer to sarcoma, prostate cancer, mesothelioma, melanoma, CNS tumors and more.

ASCO 23: Global Health Initiative is Ensuring Equitable Cancer Care Beyond South Florida’s Borders

Dr. Gilberto Lopes will present information on the Access to Oncology Medicines (ATOM) Coalition, a global initiative established by the Union for International Cancer Control and partners to reduce suffering and deaths from cancer in low- and lower middle-income countries by improving patient access to essential cancer medicine. The coalition includes academic medical, pharmaceutical companies, foundations and professional associations such as the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

New Study Shows Mortality Rates for All Major Cancers Decreasing Globally, Except Liver Cancer in Men and Lung Cancer in Women

A new study conducted by scientists at the American Cancer Society and Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center reveals recent mortality rates for all major cancers decreased in most of the studied countries except lung cancer in females and liver cancer in males, where increasing rates were observed in most countries. The research also showed that cancer-specific mortality rates varied substantially across countries, with rates of lung and cervical cancer varying by 10-fold. The study was published today in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Empowering people with epilepsy to lead the way in reducing stigma

Stigma affects all aspects of epilepsy care. It affects the lives of people with epilepsy when they are not given equal access to education, employment, and social opportunities. In a US study, one-third of respondents identified stigma—not seizures—as the most difficult part of living with epilepsy.

Water for the World: University of Rhode Island researchers available for interview

Access to safe water, proper sanitation and hygiene are essential for human survival. As the United Nations convenes its first major conference on water quality since 1977, researchers at the University of Rhode Island are seeking better ways to provide potable water and stop pollution from contaminating water supplies.

The Journal of Medical Internet Research | Chatbot Conversations During COVID-19: Topic Modeling and Sentiment Analysis

This study examined the COVID-19 pandemic–related topics online users discussed with a commercially available chatbot and compared the sentiment expressed by users from five culturally different countries.

US falls far behind most of the world in support for fathers and caregivers of aging adults

Today, the WORLD Policy Analysis Center (WORLD) at UCLA, launched “Equality within Our Lifetimes,” the most comprehensive analysis to date of laws and policies related to gender equality in all 193 U.N. member states. While the U.S. performs well in some areas, it has become even more of an outlier when it comes to care.

Saint Louis University Researcher Receives $2.83 Million NIH Grant to Increase HPV Prevention Strategies in Nigeria

When designing strategies to create lasting impact in a particular community, there is no better resource than the strength and intelligence of the community members themselves, and in this case, girls and women. Using crowdsourcing as a framework, a Saint Louis University researcher aims to increase HPV vaccination and HPV screening to lower incidents of cervical cancer among girls and women in Nigeria.

Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health Awarded $8 Million to Expand Global Partnerships in Education and Research

The Arnhold Institute for Global Health at Mount Sinai has received $8 million from the Arnhold Foundation, enabling doctors, researchers, and students to advance its already-strong base of clinical education programs, training, research, and care services to address the world’s leading health issues and improve global health systems.

SLU Researcher Receives $1.76 Million NIH Grant to Create STAR, an HIV-Focused Experiential Research and Capacity Building Program for Students and Young Researchers

Using a crowdsourcing framework utilized over the past five years, Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D., professor of global health and behavioral science and health education at Saint Louis University’s College for Public Health and Social Justice, is taking what she learned from empowering youth in Nigeria to identify young people in the United States who aim to become the next generation of HIV researchers, leaders and innovators in the field.

International policy adviser, epidemiologist Dr. Saad Omer selected inaugural dean for UT Southwestern’s O’Donnell School of Public Health

Internationally recognized epidemiologist Saad B. Omer, M.B.B.S, Ph.D., who currently directs the Yale Institute for Global Health, has been appointed the inaugural Dean of the Peter O’Donnell Jr. School of Public Health at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Paul Farmer Collaborative to Amplify Work and Honor Legacy of Global Health Champion

A $50 million gift from Woburn, Mass.-based Cummings Foundation will build upon and amplify the work of the late Paul Farmer, a champion of global health.

The gift establishes the Paul Farmer Collaborative of Harvard Medical School and the University of Global Health Equity (UGHE) in Rwanda. It will be divided equally between the two institutions.

How can primary health care help to close the epilepsy treatment gap? A journey through Andhra Pradesh, India

Hours from the nearest city in India, down a pothole-studded road framed by fish farms, primary care centers in Andra Pradesh provide service to tens of thousands of people. How do these centers care for people with epilepsy, and what challenges do they face?

Global health researchers use human movement patterns to determine risk of malaria spreading during certain times of day

In a paper recently published in Malaria Journal, global health researchers, Daniel Parker, PhD, assistant professor, and Guiyun Yan, PhD, professor, both from the UCI Program in Public Health, analyzed the movement ecology of humans in two places of heightened importance for Ethiopia’s malaria control and elimination strategies: Gambella and Benishangul-Gumuz (on the international border with Sudan and South Sudan).

Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health Announces Partnership With the Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences and Dhulikhel Hospital in Nepal to Address Global Health

Agreement provides framework to enhance global health care, education, and research

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health-led research demonstrates the importance of influenza vaccination globally

An international team of researchers has demonstrated that among patients hospitalized for influenza, those who were vaccinated had less severe infections, including reducing the odds for children requiring admittance to an intensive care unit by almost half.

Current vaccine approach not enough to eradicate measles

Current vaccination strategies are unlikely to eliminate measles, according to a new study led by faculty at the University of Georgia. The paper, which published today in The Lancet Global Health, explores the feasibility of eliminating measles and rubella using predominant vaccination strategies in 93 countries with the highest disease burden.