How Kids Eat: Five New Insights on Daily Habits and Childhood Obesity

What we eat during childhood can affect the health of individuals—and populations—for years to come. As rates of childhood obesity continue to rise, five studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into the diets of children and teens around the world.

Dengue immune function discovery could benefit much-needed vaccine development

The discovery of new possible biomarkers to predict clinical and immune responses to dengue virus infection could be critical to informing future vaccines for the mosquito-borne virus, which saw a record number of over 400 million cases in 2019.

Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Waiving COVID-19 Vaccine Patents to Increase Global Vaccinations

Rutgers global health expert Richard Marlink is available to discuss the waiving of vaccine patents to help increase global vaccination rates in less developed countries — a move the Biden administration recently supported ahead of negotiations with the World Trade…

Survey Launched to Learn More about Deaths Tied to Hurricane Maria

Researchers at the George Washington University and the University of Puerto Rico will launch a first-of-its-kind survey to investigate the causes of deaths that occurred during the first two weeks after Hurricane Maria. The fact-finding mission will help identify the factors and socio-environmental conditions that led to more than 1,700 deaths in the immediate aftermath of the storm.

It’s morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine

Rich nations should not engage in “vaccine nationalism” and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Climate Change is Hurting Children’s Diets, Global Study Finds

A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education.

The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children’s diet diversity.

Of the six regions examined–in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America–five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures.

Go Inside the Most Innovative Minds in Science and Medicine on “Real, Smart People,” a New Podcast

Podcast from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai offers a glimpse into the real story of how science and medicine moves forward, one smart person at a time.

Mount Sinai’s Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Honored by Thai Royal Family for Outstanding Medical Contributions

Thailand’s Royal Family has named Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, a winner of the 29th annual Prince Mahidol Award in the field of Medicine.

AACC and CDC Partner to Improve Cardiovascular Disease Testing Around the World

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce a new collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the CDC Foundation that aims to expand lipid testing in resource-limited countries. Improving access to this essential testing could help reduce the high worldwide mortality rate from cardiovascular disease by enabling patients to get treated for this condition earlier.

Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health Partners with NYC Health + Hospitals on COVID-19 Unit for Research at Elmhurst (CURE-19)

Collaboration Brings Together Clinicians and Researchers on the Front Lines of COVID-19 to Support Innovative Solutions for Health Disparities

Reporting on Local Health Systems

Susan Dentzer, health-care analyst, commentator, journalist, and senior policy fellow at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, discusses local health systems, including how they are coping with the COVID-19 pandemic and best practices for reporting on the subject. Carla Anne Robbins, CFR adjunct senior fellow and former deputy editorial page editor at the New York Times, hosts the webinar.

New book examines human right to health, pushes for rating system for pharmaceutical companies

Every human being has the right to health and new initiatives should be put in place to encourage pharmaceutical companies to ensure that everyone has access to essential medicine, according to a new book from Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

American College of Radiology and RAD-AID Collaborate to Support Global Health Radiology Education

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) and RAD-AID are working to enhance the delivery of ACR Case in Point to RAD-AID’s partnered, resource-poor hospitals in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). These efforts will strengthen the accessibility and quality of training materials in various medically underserved regions around the world.

Dearth of Medical Resources in Africa for COVID-19 Reminiscent of Early HIV/AIDS Pandemic

Global health scholars have issued a clarion call about the needless loss of life expected because of a foreseeable prospect of “slow and inadequate access to supplies” to control COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. They say what is unfolding now is similar to when lifesaving diagnostics and treatments came to the region long after they were available elsewhere.

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases

High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences.

Coronavirus crisis: governments, organizations need to get creative to avoid healthcare rationing

Governmental and nongovernmental organizations need to get creative to avoid healthare rationing during the coronavirus crisis, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York and head of the Global Health Impact project. “While transparency is…

Schedule Announced for Nutrition 2020

Nutrition 2020 is your source for the latest news on food, nutrition and health. This flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, to be held May 30–June 2 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, will feature new research findings and panel discussions addressing hot topics in nutrition science, clinical practice and policy.

Three-year, $1.35 million grant to aid mental health programming in western Kenya

The Astellas Global Health Foundation has awarded the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH), under the direction of the Indiana University Center for Global Health, a three-year, $1.35 million grant to provide 400,000 people with access to mental health programming in western Kenya.

New methods for resource allocation needed to meet global health needs

How should states and international organizations allocate global health resources? Nicole Hassoun, associate professor of philsophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York, said that it is important to develop new models for evaluating allocations of health-related resources. Financial resources…

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop Novel Method to Identify Patterns Among Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditions

A study by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai proposes a novel method for identifying patterns in the frequency and cost of multiple chronic conditions (MCC).

$10M gift from Tadataka and Leslie Yamada will fuel U-M efforts to improve the world’s health

For decades, University of Michigan teams have tackled some of the world’s toughest health challenges through research, education and global partnership. Now, thanks to a new $10 million gift, those teams will have new resources to think even bigger, work together and with global partners more effectively, and make a greater positive impact on the health and health care of people with the greatest need worldwide.

UW names population health building after Swedish physician and ‘very serious possibilist’ Hans Rosling

Hans Rosling — a Swedish doctor, statistician, author and professor — will be a name associated with the University of Washington’s transformative work in population health. Today, the UW Board of Regents approved naming the $230 million building under construction on UW’s Seattle campus the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and CUNY School of Public Health Collaborate to Offer Medical Students M.D./M.P.H. Program

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) announced an agreement today to offer Einstein medical students an opportunity to complete a five-year program resulting in a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree from Einstein and a Master’s Degree in Public Health (M.P.H.) degree from CUNY SPH.

New World Health Organization Report on Vision Shows Need for Sustainable Global Outreach Programs

Staggering new statistics released by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its first World Report on Vision estimate more than 1 billion people are visually impaired because they don’t get the care they need—a finding that brings renewed urgency for sustainable global outreach efforts. The statistics underscore the need for programs like the donor-funded John A. Moran Eye Center Global Outreach Division at the University of Utah, which works to create sustainable eye care systems in developing nations and to reach underserved populations in Utah.