Nation’s Newest Physicians Graduate Virtually in the Midst of COVID-19

The 63 members of the class of 2020 recited the Hippocratic Oath in unison, virtually, as they were conferred the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree. More than half the class will start their residency program in a state that is currently considered a hotspot for COVID-19. Seven are headed to New York; others will be going to New Jersey, Illinois, California, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Louisiana and Texas. One of the most popular residencies among FAU’s class of 2020 is emergency medicine; eight of the 63 graduates (13 percent) will begin training in emergency medicine this July.

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UNC School of Medicine Ranked First for Primary Care for Third Straight Year

For the third year in a row, the University of North Carolina School of Medicine was ranked first in the country for primary care education as a part of U.S. News & World Report’s 2021 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools.”

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National Study: Medical Students Become Less Empathic Toward Patients Throughout Medical School

The nationwide, multi-institutional cross-sectional study of students at DO-granting medical schools found that those students – like their peers in MD-granting medical schools – lose empathy as they progress through medical school. However, the DO (or osteopathic) students surveyed lost their empathy to a lesser degree than their MD (doctor of medicine) peers.

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Mayo medical student jump-starts school curriculum to identify victims of human trafficking

As human trafficking evolves as a health concern, medical schools are starting to include the topic in education. However, it’s still in the early stages, says a Mayo Clinic study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The research was led by third-year medical student at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, Jennifer Talbott, who suggested that human trafficking training be included in the curriculum at the school.

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More medical students are telling their schools about their disabilities, and schools are responding, study finds

The percentage of medical students who told their schools that they have a disability rose sharply in recent years, a new study shows. Medical schools made changes, called accommodations, for nearly all medical students who disclosed the fact that they have a condition that qualifies as a disability, the study also finds.

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