Understanding protective behavior and vaccination adoption among US individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic: A four-wave longitudinal study

Abstract During the long COVID-19 pandemic, individuals’ attitudes toward protective measures and vaccination vary, yet, research remains unclear about the dynamics underlying them. We collected matched data from US respondents at four time points from the beginning of the pandemic…

Everyday social interactions predict language development in infants

In a study published April 8 in Current Biology, University of Washington researchers found that when the adult talked and played socially with a 5-month-old baby, the baby’s brain activity particularly increased in regions responsible for attention — and the level of this type of activity predicted enhanced language development at later ages.

Senior Staff Give More Constructive Feedback When They Think They’ll Work With You Again

A new study finds senior staff are more likely to provide constructive feedback and coaching to junior staff when the juniors are in the same office and/or when the senior staff know the juniors will be working with them again in the future.

Monkey see, monkey do: how sideline sports behaviours affect kids

For children’s sports, there’s no doubt that parents are essential – they’re the free ferry service, the half-time orange supplier, and the local cheer squad. But when it comes to sideline behaviour, some parents can behave badly, and when this happens it’s often a case of ‘monkey see, monkey do’.

Viewers Actually ‘Binge-Watch’ TV with a lot of Self-Control

If viewers sometimes feel guilty about binge-watching television programing, they really shouldn’t. Though its name implies impulsive behavior, binge-watching TV is a common activity planned out by viewers, suggests new research from the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management and School of Global Policy and Strategy.

Early crop plants were more easily ‘tamed’

Plants are capable of responding to people and have behaviors comparable to tameness, according to authors of new research that calls for a reappraisal of the process of plant domestication, based on almost a decade of observations and experiments.

Copy-cat? Youth with Few Friends Conform to Stay in a Friend’s ‘Good Graces’

What gives one friend influence over another? Considerable attention has focused on who influences whom; much less is known about why one partner is prone to be influenced by the other. A study tested the hypothesis that within a friend dyad, having fewer friends than one’s partner increases susceptibility to influence, because it reduces dissimilarity and promotes compatibility. Results showed that partners with fewer friends were influenced by children with more friends. In each case, the partner with fewer friends became more similar to the partner with more friends. Academic engagement was the only domain where partners with fewer friends also influenced partners with more friends.

Rare Human Gene Variant in ADHD, Autism Exposes Fundamental Sex Differences

Key differences in male and female mice brains provide new insights into how sex determines the mechanisms by which distinct synapses monitor and regulate dopamine signaling. The impact of sex differences is particularly pronounced when the mice express a human genetic variant found in boys with either ADHD or autism. Behavioral generalizations across the sexes may limit diagnosis of mental illness, especially if one sex translates alterations into outward signs such as hyperactivity and aggression vs. more internal manifestations such as learning, memory and mood, even when the same molecular pathology is at work.

JMIR Biomedical Engineering | Using Machine Learning to Reduce Treatment Burden

JMIR Publications recently published “Reducing Treatment Burden Among People With Chronic Conditions Using Machine Learning: Viewpoint” in JMIR Biomedical Engineering which reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated multiple challenges within the health care system and is unique to those living with chronic conditions.

Cat’s Meow: Robotic Pet Boosts Mood, Behavior and Cognition in Adults with Dementia

Researchers tested the effectiveness of affordable, interactive robotic pet cats to improve mood, behavior and cognition in older adults with mild to moderate dementia.

‘Octo Girl’ Takes a Deep Dive to Discover How Diverse Octopus Species Coexist

A first in situ, long-term study explored how the common octopus, a medium-sized octopus widely distributed in tropical and temperate seas worldwide and the Atlantic longarm octopus, a small species of octopus found in the Atlantic Ocean and elsewhere, coexist by examining their foraging habits and tactics, diet, behaviors and when they are active or inactive. Results show that their very different behaviors and habits is exactly how these two species coexist in a shallow Florida lagoon- even at high densities.

Do Passengers Want Self-driving Cars to Behave More or Less Like Them?

Researchers asked participants about their personal driving behaviors such as speed, changing lanes, accelerating and decelerating and passing other vehicles. They also asked them the same questions about their expectations of a self-driving car performing these very same tasks. The objective of the study was to examine trust and distrust to see if there is a relationship between an individual’s driving behaviors and how they expect a self-driving car to behave.

Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarette Packaging Changes Perceptions

A Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at University of California San Diego clinical trial showed that graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging changes perceptions of smokers to recognize the negative consequences of tobacco and consider quitting.

Neuroscientists posit that brain region is a key locus of learning

Small and seemingly specialized, the brain’s locus coeruleus (LC) region has been stereotyped for its outsized export of the arousal-stimulating neuromodulator norepinephrine. In a new paper and with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health, an MIT neuroscience…

Four themes identified as contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania

Hershey, Pa. — Financial instability, lack of infrastructure, a deteriorating sense of community and family fragmentation are key contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania communities, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Highmark Health researchers. The researchers conducted…

Take two: Integrating neuronal perspectives for richer results

Every brain function, from standing up to deciding what to have for dinner, involves neurons interacting. Studies focused on neuronal interactions extend across domains in neuroscience, primarily using the approaches of spike count correlation or dimensionality reduction. Pioneering research from…

Daniel McNeil 2021 recipient of the IADR Distinguished Scientist Award in BEHSR

Alexandria, Va., USA – The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) announced Daniel McNeil, West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA, as the 2021 recipient of the IADR Distinguished Scientist Award in Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research. McNeil was recognized during…