7th International Conference Lifelong Learning for All 2021: Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the Covid-19 Crisis and Beyond

Timed to coincide with International Literacy Day 2021, the Department of Lifelong Education, Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University, has collaborated with the Faculty of Education’s R&D Center for Lifelong Learning for Active Aging, Research Center for Children and Youth Development (CYD), and DVV International, to organize the 7th International Conference on Lifelong Learning for All 2021 (LLL 2021). For this year, the topic is “Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis and Beyond”.

The Monday Campaigns Offers DeStress Monday at School to Reduce Teacher Stress

Studies show most teachers experience high stress levels. The COVID-19 pandemic only exacerbated the problem. Many teachers felt heightened pressure and experienced burnout as they navigated hybrid and remote teaching in the midst of a global pandemic. When teachers go back to the classroom this fall, they will undoubtedly continue to feel stress as they face the uncertainties that lie ahead. To provide teachers with effective tools to relieve stress, The Monday Campaigns, a nonprofit public health initiative, is offering their DeStress Monday at School program free of charge to schools.

AERA Statement in Support of Teachers and Educators

As the end of the school year draws near, we want to acknowledge the incredible creativity, resilience, and hard work of educators this year. It has been a time like no other. Educators have experienced enormous stress and strain to adapt to constantly changing contexts amid concerns about their own health and the health of their students. Educators have also been challenged by the existing and ever increasing inequities between privileged and historically marginalized students in U.S. schools that the pandemic has underscored. These long-standing inequities have exacerbated the challenges teachers have had to manage this year, and have impacted the resources available to them in pivoting to pandemic teaching, as well as the conditions that their students and families are navigating.

Teachers Invited to Participate in Virtual Science Activities Night

Elementary and middle school teachers are invited to register now to participate in the annual Virginia Region II Teacher Night hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility on April 14, 2021. The fully virtual event will allow educators to see demonstrations of new methods for teaching physical science concepts and safely meet and interact with their colleagues, all while they pick up one recertification point from the comfort of their own homes. Advance registration is required, and the event is open to all upper elementary and middle school teachers of physical science.

FAU Offers K-12 Teachers Free Course on Tips to Teach Online

To address the many challenges of teaching online, FAU’s College of Education is offering a free eight-hour online certificate course for K-12 teachers to assist them with teaching online. This continuing education certificate course provides school districts timely assistance to enhance teachers’ e-learning skills and provides time-saving tips in lesson planning and effective student assessments for online teaching.

COVID-19 and the Future of Education

The year 2020 hasn’t just been one for the history books: It’s made quite an impact on K-12 grade books as well. As the COVID-19 pandemic drags on into another school year, the school playground has instead become a battleground for adults — teachers, parents, school administrators, public health officials, lawmakers — rowing over the future of education: Should schools reopen? Is remote learning just as effective as in-person classes, and is the technology available to ensure equity for all students? For schools that open, is enough funding available to effectively protect teachers and students from COVID-19? For those that don’t, what about parents’ need to return to work despite the need for at-home teaching? For answers, we turned to Bradley Marianno, a UNLV College of Education professor and expert on teachers’ unions.

School spending cuts? Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crises

With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis.

Free ArtPlay workshops for teachers will share tips for virtual teaching Aug. 11, Aug. 17

When musical theater and visual arts summer camps went online at the University of Alabama at Birmingham this summer, staff did not know what to expect. The award-winning camps, presented by UAB’s ArtPlay, are always popular, to the point of selling out all available spaces. Despite the teachers’ fears, campers and their parents loved the new virtual camps.

Back to School?

Dr. Terry Adirim provides answers to some of the most frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 and return to school for school-age children. Adirim is a physician executive with senior leadership and executive experience in academic medicine and the federal government. Her expertise includes pandemic planning and response, health care quality improvement and patient safety, and health policy and management.

Research Finds Teachers Just as Likely to Have Racial Bias as Non-Teachers

Research released today challenges the notion that teachers might be uniquely equipped to instill positive racial attitudes in children or bring about racial justice, without additional support or training from schools. Instead, the results, published in Educational Researcher, find that “teachers are people too,” holding almost as much pro-White racial bias as non-teachers of the same race, level of education, age, gender, and political affiliation.

Don’t forget our kids. OT researchers urge extra support for home schooling vulnerable children

As Australia’s teachers strive to shift education online, parents everywhere are bracing for change, but no more so than parents of children with additional needs such as autism, who fear their kids may be left behind in the race to adjust.

Another Unintended Consequence of COVID-19: Cyberbullying Could Increase

School districts nationwide are now providing K-12 education online. Stuck at home all day, students will be using apps even more than they already do, which could cause an increase in cyberbullying among youth. Many cyberbullying targets will hesitate to get help from their parents and will suffer silently because they can’t readily stop by the guidance counselor’s office or chat with a teacher after class. A cyberbullying expert provides important tips and advice for teachers and parents.

CFES Brilliant Pathways Kicks Off Nationwide Effort to Train 5,000 College and Career Advisors to Increase Student Success

Leaders in higher education, business and K-12 education shared the latest research and best practices with 50 individuals from New York and Vermont as part of a national effort by CFES Brilliant Pathways to train 5,000 College and Career Readiness Advisors by 2022.

Trauma and kids:

As catastrophic bushfires continue to rage across New South Wales and Queensland, thousands of people are reeling from the devastation. It’s a shocking start to Australia’s fire season, but beyond the physical damage, the emotional scars persist, especially for Australia’s youngest citizens. Now, in new research from the University of South Australia, researchers have explored the growing uncertainty faced by children aged 0-8 years in disaster zones, finding that early childhood teachers hold a vital role in supporting children dealing with trauma.

Teaching Preschool Caregivers about Healthy Behaviors May Promote Healthier Lifestyle in Some High-Risk Groups

Study Shows Vascular Ultrasounds and Adhering to Interventional Education in Underserved Communities can Improve Health among Parents and School Staff