Blacks Found Twice as Likely to Have Atherosclerosis as Hispanics in Young Adult Populations in Underserved Communities

A unique Mount Sinai study focused on a multi-ethnic, underserved community in New York City shows that young Black adults are twice as likely to have atherosclerosis as similarly situated young Hispanic adults.

Ultrasound-Assisted Laser Technique Vaporizes Artery Plaque #ASA182

Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. During the 182nd ASA Meeting, Rohit Singh, of the University of Kansas, will present a method that combines a low-power laser with ultrasound to remove arterial plaque safely and efficiently.

Lower- and higher-dose aspirin achieve similar protection and safety for people with cardiovascular disease

People with cardiovascular disease (CVD) taking aspirin to lower their chances of suffering a heart attack or stroke experienced similar health benefits, including reduced death and hospitalization for heart attack and stroke, whether they took a high or low dose of aspirin, according to a study presented today at ACC.21, the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Scientists find genetic link to clogged arteries

High cholesterol is the most commonly understood cause of atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries that raises the risk of heart attack and stroke. But now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a gene that likely plays a causal role in coronary artery disease independent of cholesterol levels. The gene also likely has roles in related cardiovascular diseases, including high blood pressure and diabetes.

T cells can shift from helping to harming in atherosclerosis

At La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) researchers are dedicated to finding a way to stop plaques from forming in the first place. In a new study, LJI scientists show that certain T lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, that start out trying to fight the disease can end up increasing inflammation and making atherosclerosis cases even worse.

Could This Plaque Identifying Toothpaste Prevent a Heart Attack or Stroke?

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body – in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.

Earlier detection of women’s vascular health issues can affect heart disease risk, Mayo Clinic study advises

Men and women differ in the way their vascular systems age and the rate at which atherosclerosis ― the hardening of artery walls or buildup of arterial blockage ― progresses over time. These sex- and age-related differences have a direct bearing on a woman’s risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Teaching Preschool Caregivers about Healthy Behaviors May Promote Healthier Lifestyle in Some High-Risk Groups

Study Shows Vascular Ultrasounds and Adhering to Interventional Education in Underserved Communities can Improve Health among Parents and School Staff