Revealing the Secrets to Grooming “Young Innovators” for “9 Global Innovation Awards”

Recently bursting into the scene were young innovators from Chulalongkorn Demonstration School who snatched six gold medals and three silver medals from the International Innovation and Invention Competition in the Republic of Poland last June – cementing the trend of human resource development of the future.

7th International Conference Lifelong Learning for All 2021: Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the Covid-19 Crisis and Beyond

Timed to coincide with International Literacy Day 2021, the Department of Lifelong Education, Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University, has collaborated with the Faculty of Education’s R&D Center for Lifelong Learning for Active Aging, Research Center for Children and Youth Development (CYD), and DVV International, to organize the 7th International Conference on Lifelong Learning for All 2021 (LLL 2021). For this year, the topic is “Teaching and Learning for Out-of-School Children and Older Adult Learners in the COVID-19 Crisis and Beyond”.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

-Study: Race and Ethnicity May Impact Prevalence and Treatment of Heart Valve Dysfunction
-Johns Hopkins Medicine Suggests Eliminating Nerve Cell Protein May Stop ALS, Dementia
-Researchers Tell Doctors to Avoid Routine Urinary Tests for Older Patients with Delirium
-Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Show How Air Pollution May Cause Chronic Sinusitis
-Researchers ID Location on Brain Protein Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development
-COVID-19 News: The Return of Onsite Schooling — and How to Keep Your Kids Safe from COVID

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100
– COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths
– COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
– Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

From ‘distress’ to ‘unscathed’ — mental health of UW students during spring 2020

To understand how the UW’s transition to online-only classes affected college students’ mental health in the spring of 2020, UW researchers surveyed 147 UW undergraduates over the 2020 spring quarter.

On the one-year anniversary of the pandemic in the U.S., experts @JohnsHopkins can speak about the implications of WFH and SchoolFH on the future of work and education.

The United States is approaching the one-year anniversary of the pandemic forcing the closure of offices and schools across the country, launching millions of Americans into remote work and schooling. Johns Hopkins University experts who have been studying the short…

Chula Turns Old Smartphones into 2,500 Microscopes for Schools

Chulalongkorn University, in cooperation with the Ministry of Digital Economy and Society, will retrofit 500 old smartphones donated by Thai Samsung Electrics, Co., Ltd. with CU Smart Lens invented by Professor Sanong Akasit, Ph.D., Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, and turn them into microscopes. The microscopes will be donated to 500 marginal schools throughout the country as part of the “2,500 Microscopes from Old Cell Phones for Marginal Schools“ project, which supports equal opportunity in science education for all.

Parents: Tips to reduce anxiety for kids returning to school

This fall presents a challenge for parents as their kids adjust to a school year unlike any other. Matthew McConn, chair of the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Educational Leadership at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has advice…

Baylor Scott & White Health Launches Digital At-Home Monitoring for Children Diagnosed with COVID-19

Baylor Scott & White Health has launched expanded digital care options via the MyBSWHealth app and online portal to provide support for children who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Digital at-home monitoring has been available for adults ages 18 and older since May

COVID-19 and the Future of Education

The year 2020 hasn’t just been one for the history books: It’s made quite an impact on K-12 grade books as well. As the COVID-19 pandemic drags on into another school year, the school playground has instead become a battleground for adults — teachers, parents, school administrators, public health officials, lawmakers — rowing over the future of education: Should schools reopen? Is remote learning just as effective as in-person classes, and is the technology available to ensure equity for all students? For schools that open, is enough funding available to effectively protect teachers and students from COVID-19? For those that don’t, what about parents’ need to return to work despite the need for at-home teaching? For answers, we turned to Bradley Marianno, a UNLV College of Education professor and expert on teachers’ unions.

School spending cuts? Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crises

With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis.

[email protected] pediatrician @LisaGwynn, incoming president of #Florida chapter of the @AmerAcadPeds helped issue new guidance on #reopeningschools calling for safety and science to drive decisions.

Lisa Gwynn, D.O., M.B.A., is associate professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami Health Sytem, Miller School of Medicine (UMMSOM) and serves as Medical Director for the Pediatric Mobile Clinic, a program that provides…

Investing in the mind: Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa

Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa.

The switch to online education shows that schools provide much more than academic education

The switch to online education has been a difficult adjustment for educational institutions across the country, but students are missing out on much more than in-class learning. Adam Laats, professor of education and history at Binghamton University, State University of…

Low-income students face a lack of educational opportunity amid the coronavirus pandemic

With schools transitioning to online learning due to the coronavirus, an education scholar at Binghamton University, State University of New York says that not all students may be benefitting from virtual education. Adam Laats, professor of education and history at…

Rutgers Experts Can Discuss Emissions, Climate Change During COVID-19 Crisis

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 13, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick experts are available for interviews on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on greenhouse gas emissions, climate change and efforts to promote a greener economy and lifestyles. “During the 2007…

Self-regulation for kids: at home, at school and with autism

As every teacher will assert, self-regulation is the key to optimal learning; it helps kids tune in, stay focussed and be ready to learn. But what if your child isn’t wired this way? For many children, self-regulation is hard to master, but for kids on the autism spectrum, it can seem insurmountable, singling them out and creating barriers to their learning.

Parent confidence is key to keeping kids from unhealthy foods

As the countdown to a new school year begins, many parents will soon find themselves facing the often-arduous task of filling the school lunchbox which, despite the best of intentions, often ends up containing more junk food than nutrition.

Cutting kids’ consumption of unhealthy food is the focus on a new study by the University of South Australia and Flinders University, where lead researcher and PhD candidate Brittany Johnson says there is clear connection between parents’ motivations, and their children’s intake of unhealthy foods.