City-Funded Housing Repairs in Low-Income Neighborhoods Associated with Drop in Crime

In Philadelphia, when a home received repairs through a city-funded program, total crime dropped by 21.9% on that block, and as the number of repaired houses on a block increased, instances of crime fell even further, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published today in JAMA Network Open.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100
– COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths
– COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
– Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

Most Californians unaware of law to prevent gun violence but would support using it

A new study shows that two-thirds of Californians don’t know about a law designed to prevent a person at risk of hurting themselves or others from possessing or purchasing firearms or ammunition. More than 80% of survey participants were supportive once they read about this law.

2021 Posters on the Hill Spotlights Exemplary Undergraduate Research Projects for Policymakers, Scholars, and the Public

Via a virtual public poster session on April 28, undergraduate researchers from colleges and universities in 42 states and the District of Columbia will share their research projects in the 2021 Posters on the Hill event, sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research.

Gun owner perceptions about actual firearm dangers suggest opportunities for improving gun safety

People who own guns and those living with gun owners are substantially less worried about the risk of firearm injuries than individuals living in homes without guns, says a new study by violence prevention experts at UC Davis Health.

New Report on Enforcement of Gun Laws in Baltimore Finds More Focused Approached Could Reduce Violence, Improve Community Relationships with City Police

A new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that broad “stop-and-search” practices used for many years by Baltimore police to look for illegally possessed guns have minimal, if any, impact on gun violence. These practices also result in mental and physical harm to those who are unjustifiably searched and serve to undermine community trust in police. The researchers also found that residents of communities most impacted by gun violence in Baltimore want more focused and accountable law enforcement to reduce gun violence.

SURVEY: WOULD-BE PURCHASERS OF FIREARMS IN BALTIMORE’S UNDERGROUND GUN MARKET FACE OBSTACLES

A small survey conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that more than half of respondents who reported having attempted to acquire a firearm in Baltimore’s underground firearm market in the prior six months were unsuccessful—some due to lack of financial means, and others reporting they had no trusted point of contact for acquiring guns through unlawful means.

Most Mass Shootings Occur Closest to Hospitals without Verification to Treat Trauma

In an analysis of 2019 mass shootings and hospital locations, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that the closest hospital to more than 70% of mass shootings was a non-trauma center, where sudden, high casualty loads were more likely to overwhelm capacity and trauma-specific care options may have been limited. They also found that in more than half of mass shooting events, the nearest pediatric trauma center was more than 10 miles away.

STRATEGIES TO LOWER RISK FOR VIOLENT CRIME AND GUN VIOLENCE

With violent crimes and gun violence rising annually and the number of gun deaths in the U.S. surpassing all other nations, researchers at the annual meeting of The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) present a series of studies during its Study of Violent Crime and Gun Violence symposium which contributes several new frameworks that can be used toward improving laws, civilian strategies, legislation and police response, as well as the overall study of risk in society. The Symposium will occur on Monday, December 9 at 10:30 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia.

Gun Violence, Bullying and Poverty Again Named as Top Three Social Concerns for Youth by Chicago Parents

Consistent with last year, Chicago parents again selected gun violence, bullying/cyberbullying and poverty as the top three social problems for children and adolescents in the city, according to the latest survey results released by Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH). Hunger was new to this year’s top 10 list of social issues facing youth, with 62 percent of parents across all community areas in Chicago considering it a big problem.

Giving Trauma Patients a Hormone that Helps Stabilize Blood Pressure Cuts Blood Transfusions by Half

Giving trauma patients with severe blood loss the hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) cut the volume of blood products required to stabilize them by half, according to results of a new, first-of-its-kind clinical trial from Penn Medicine. The authors say the study is particularly important for the treatment of patients with gun-related injuries. Each year, there are over 100,00 firearm-related injuries with over 36,000 deaths.